Dr. John Richardson

John-Richardson-Faculty-Photo-2016


Office: FSC 325
Phone: (717) 477-1774
Email:jnrich@ship.edu





Research Introduction

As an analytical chemist, I focus primarily on application of specific types of chemical instrumentation to make measurements that help to solve interesting applied problems in chemistry. Some of these projects delve into other areas of chemistry including physical chemistry, forensic chemistry, biochemistry, materials chemistry and chemical education.

Research Projects

My student collaborators and I have been (and continue to be) involved in a number of different projects ranging over almost all areas of chemistry.A few specific ones are listed below.

  1. Application of nanoparticle materials to development of new chemical sensors.

  2. Development of mathematical models to describe interesting physical phenomena such as gelation, diffusion, and long-range electron transfer.This work has resulted from a fruitful collaboration with Dr. Jeb Kegerreis, who works with designing mathematical models to help us describe these phenomena. An interesting example is recent work that used theory to help elucidate the gelling properties of aerogel materials by examining how the optical properties of embedded nanoparticles change during the gelling process.

  3. Development of new laboratory methods and experiments for chemical instrumentation, quantitative analysis, and physical chemistry courses.One example is another collaborative project with Dr. Kegerreis in which we developed a new physical chemistry laboratory experiment to help students better understand the Fourier Transform algorithm, which is utilized in many different areas of chemistry.

  4. Research in forensic chemistry. Here, we look for useful applications of chemical instrumentation methods to better detect and evaluate illicit drugs in various matrices.A recent example was a project done in collaboration with Dr. Dan Predecki and the staff at the Cumberland County (PA) Crime Lab, which explored the use of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) as a means of detecting and quantifying fluorine-containing synthetic cannabinoids.

Selected Publications

(SU student coauthors in bold)

  • 2015, Journal of Chemical Education, T. C. Miller, J. N. Richardson, and J. S.Kegerreis, “Improved Understanding of Fourier Transforms Found in Physical and Analytical Chemistry,” submitted.
  • 2014, Journal of Materials Chemistry and Physics, 148 478, K. A. Mengle, J. N.Richardson, J. S. Kegerreis, “Modeling of the Processing Dynamics of Aerogel/Gold Nanoparticle Composites”
  • 2011, Sensors and Actuators B, 158, 271, J. N. Richardson, A. L. Drake, C. E.Lazo-Miller, and I. L. Lagadic, “Detection of Lead in Environmental Water Samples Using an Organosilicate Film-Based Attenuated Total Reflectance Sensor”.
  • 2008, International Journal of Environmental Analytical Chemistry, 88, 119, J. R.Bailey, D. H. Julian, A. J. Armstrong, and J. N. Richardson, “A Simple Optical Sensor for Chromium (VI) based on a Cationic Ion Exchange Film Coupled with Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroscopy”
  • 2005, Sensors and Actuators B, 110, 112, A. L. Weikel, S. D. Conklin, J. N.Richardson, “A Multiple Reflection Attenuated Total Reflectance Absorbance Sensor Incorporating a Glass-Indium Tin Oxide Surface Modified via Direct Attachment or Film Encapsulation of Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles.”
  • 2005, Electrochimica Acta, 50, 3199, T. Shtoyko, J. N. Richardson, C. J.Seliskar, W. R. Heineman, “Spectroelectrochemical Sensing Based onMultimode Selectivity Achievable in a Single Device. 14. Enhancing Sensitivity of a Metal Complex Ion by Ligand Exchange”
  • 2004, Journal of Chemical Education, 81, 1617, T. Shtoyko, I. Zudans, J. N.Richardson, C. J. Seliskar, and W. R. Heineman, “An Attenuated Total Reflectance Sensor for Copper: An Experiment in Analytical or Physical Chemistry”
  • 2004, Analytical Chemistry, 76, 3139, S. E. Andria, J. N. Richardson, N. Kaval, I.Zudans,C. J. Seliskar, and W. R. Heineman, “Spectroelectrochemical Sensing Based on Multimode Selectivity Achievable in a Single Device. 17. Improvement in Detection Limits Using Ultrathin Perfluorosulfonated Ionomer Films in Conjunction with Continuous Sample Flow”
  • 2004, Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry, 565, 311, I. Zudans, J. R. Paddock,H. Kuramitz, A. T. Maghasi, C. M. Wansapura, S. D. Conklin, N. Kaval, T. Shtoyko, D. J. Monk, S. A. Bryan, T. L. Hubler, J. N. Richardson, C. J. Seliskar, and W. R. Heineman, “Electrochemical and Optical Evaluation of Noble Metal- and Carbon-ITO Hybrid Optically Transparent Electrodes”
  • 2004, Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry, 565, 121, T. M. McEvoy, D. J.Pena, M. D. Musick, and J. N. Richardson, “A Fractal Analysis of Colloidal Au Nanoparticle Electrodes”
  • 2004, Analytical Chemistry, 76, 1458, T. Shtoyko, A. T. Maghasi, S. D. Conklin,A. Piruska, J. N. Richardson, C. J. Seliskar, and W. R. Heineman, “Spectroelectrochemical Sensing Based on Attenuated Total Reflectance Stripping Voltammetry. 2. Determination of Mercury and Lead”
  • 2004, Analytical Chemistry, 76, 1466, A. T. Maghasi, T. Shtoyko, S. D. Conklin,A. Piruska, J. N. Richardson, C. J. Seliskar, and W. R. Heineman, “Spectroelectrochemical Sensing Based on Attenuated Total Reflectance Stripping Voltammetry. 3. Determination of Cadmium and Copper”
  • 2003, Electroanalysis, 15, 1567, J. N. Richardson, A. J. Osisek, and A. L. Dyer,“Spectroelectrochemical Measurements at Colloidal Au Multilayer Optically Transparent Electrodes”
  • 2003, Electrochimica Acta, 48, 4291, J. N. Richardson, Z. P. Aguilar, N. Kaval, S. E. Andria, T. Shtoyko, C. J. Seliskar, and W. R. Heineman, “Optical and Electrochemical Evaluation of Colloidal Au Nanoparticle-ITO Hybrid Optically Transparent Electrodes and Their Application to Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroelectrochemistry”
  • 2003, Analytical Chemistry, 75, 4585, T. Shtoyko, A. T. Maghasi, J. N.Richardson, C. J. Seliskar, and W. R. Heineman, “Spectroelectrochemical Sensing Based on Attenuated Total Internal Reflectance Stripping Voltammetry. 1. Determination of Lead and Cadmium”
  • 2003, Russian Journal of Electrochemistry (Elektrokhimiya), 39, 884, W. R.Heineman, C. J. Seliskar, and J. N. Richardson, “Development and Application of Novel Thin-film Spectroelectrochemical Sensors Possessing Three Modes of Selectivity”
  • 2003, Australian Journal of Chemistry, 56, 93, W. R. Heineman, C. J. Seliskar,and J. N. Richardson, “Spectroelectrochemical Sensing Based on Multimode Selectivity Achievable in a Single Device: an Overview”
  • 2003, Journal of Chemical Education, 80, 65 J. N. Richardson, M. T. Stauffer,and J. L. Henry, “Microscale Quantitative Analysis of Hard Water Samples Using an Indirect Potassium Permanganate Redox Titration”
  • 2002, Analytical Chemistry, 74, 3330, J. N. Richardson, A. L. Dyer, M. L. Stegemiller, I. Zudans, C. J. Seliskar, and W. R. Heineman, “Spectroelectrochemical Sensing Based on Multimode Selectivity Simultaneously Achievable in a Single Device. 13. Detection of Aqueous Iron by In Situ Complexation with 2,2’-Bipyridine”

Former Group Members

  1. Tyler Davidson: Graduate Student in Forensic Sciences, West Virginia University
  2. Kelsey Mengle: Graduate Student in Materials Engineering, University of Michigan
  3. Tommy Lightner: Chemical Analyst
  4. Sarah Bradley: Graduate Student, Bucknell University
  5. Corine Rollins: Pharmacy Student, Southern University
  6. Shawn Spuhler: Chemical Analyst, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
  7. Chuck Prettner: Chemical Analyst, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
  8. Derek Wolfe: Graduate Student in Analytical Chemistry, University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill)
  9. Derek Julian: Graduate Student in Analytical Chemistry, University of Cincinnati
  10. J. Ryan Bailey: Graduate Student in Analytical Chemistry, Bucknell University
  11. Arlin Weikel: Graduate Student in Inorganic Chemistry, Penn State University
  12. Sara Andria: Graduate Student in Analytical Chemistry, University of Cincinnati
  13. Aubrey Dyer: Graduate Student in Analytical Chemistry, University of Florida

Personal Interests

When not doing chemistry or teaching it, I enjoy spending my time reviewing and writing about high-end audio equipment (see parttimeaudiophile.com), working as a downhill ski instructor at Whitetail Mountain Resort, sailing my J24 sailboat, running, cycling, and hiking. I also enjoy spending time with my wife, two (almost grown) kids, and my cat named Killer.