General Education

For Students Enrolled Fall 2018+

Education at a college or university has traditionally had two equally important components—depth and breadth. Depth is provided by the academic major which a student chooses and which prepares him or her for a useful vocation; breadth of knowledge is the concern and aim of the general education curriculum. Since men and women first began to discuss the nature and purpose of education, they have seen in it something more than the mere acquisition of specific knowledge or skills, important as these may be. This something they called a liberal or general education and the need for it has been based on the ideal that a breadth of knowledge is necessary for an individual to become an informed and literate member of society.

The University adopted a new general education program that starts with students entering as first year students in the Fall 2018 semester. For students who enrolled before Fall 2018, please see the details on the Pre-Fall 2018 General Education Program.

Foundations

We want our students to build sound Foundations - 15 credits

Foundational courses coupled with other experiences provide students with their core First Year Experience, providing opportunities to develop the requisite quantitative, analytical, written communication, and oral communication skills needed to succeed while in college and throughout life after college. Five program goals express the purpose of these foundational courses and how they support student success.

First Year Seminar (U)

Guide and prompt students to develop skills in support of scholarly and academic success, engage with the university community, foster personal development and wellness, and promote understanding of diversity and social responsibility through a first year seminar.

      • UNIV101 Shippensburg University First Year Seminar>

Writing (W)

Guide and prompt students to locate and organize information with appropriate evidence and language for clear written communication.

      • ENG114 Academic Writing
      • ENG115 Advanced Placement Writing
      • HON106 Honors: Writing Intensive First-Year Seminar

Oral Communication (O)

Guide and prompt students to develop oral communication skills necessary to organize and deliver a clear message with appropriate supporting material.

      • HCS105 Introduction to Human Communication
      • HON100 Honors: Introduction to Human Communication

History (H)

Guide and prompt students to understand major historical themes, applying critical analysis to generate arguments based on appropriate evidence.

      • HIS105 Historical Foundation of Global Cultures
      • HON122 Honors: Historical Foundation of Global Cultures

Quantitative (Q)

Guide and prompt students to interpret mathematical forms, analyze through calculations, and communicate quantitative reasoning.

      • MAT105 Mathematics for Liberal Studies
      • MAT107 Mathematics Models Applied to Money
      • MAT111 Fundamentals of Mathematics II
      • MAT117 Applied Statistics
      • MAT181 Applied Calculus
      • MAT211 Calculus I
      • MAT217 Statistics I

Interconnections

We want our students to recognize Interconnections - 9 credits

This curriculum will provide students with opportunities to explore human behavior, social interactions, and global communities through humanities and the social and behavioral sciences. Open discourse about the causes and consequences of human behavior and thought, and the interconnectedness of societies revealed by examining traditions and structures, provides a pathway to mutual respect and tolerance in a diverse world.

Three program goals express what we will do for students. Each goal has an associated rubric that outlines what we expect students to learn or accomplish. Students must complete three (3) courses in this curriculum, with at least one (1) course being a diversity course (‘D’ rubric) and at least one (1) course being a global perspectives course (‘G’ rubric).

Diversity (D)

Guide and prompt students to evaluate the diversity of human experience, behavior, and thought, in order to better understand ourselves and others, to respond to the roots of inequality that undermines social justice, while developing awareness regarding diversity in culture, ethnicity, race, gender/gender expression, religion, age, social class, sexual orientation, or abilities.

      • DS100 Introduction to Disability Studies
      • ETH100 Introduction to Ethnic Studies
      • ETH101 Introduction to African American Studies
      • ETH102 Introduction to Latino Studies
      • FRN150 French Civilization
      • GEO103 Geography of the United States and Canada
      • HON102 Honors: Introduction to Women's Studies
      • HON140 Honors: Geography of the United States and Canada
      • HON151 Honors: General Psychology
      • PSY101 General Psychology
      • SPN150 Spanish Civilization & Culture
      • WST100 Introduction to Women’s Studies

Global Perspectives (G)

Guide and prompt students to develop global perspectives by analyzing systems, and evaluating interrelationships

      • ANT105 Great Discoveries in Archaeology
      • ANT111 Cultural Anthropology
      • ECO101 Principles of Macroeconomics
      • FRN204 Ideas & Cultures From the French-Speaking World
      • GER150 German Civilization & Culture
      • GER204 Ideas & Cultures From the German-Speaking World
      • HIS106 Thinking Historically in a Global Age
      • HON123 Honors: Thinking Historically in a Global Age
      • HON141 Honors: World Geography
      • HON160 Honors: Cultural Anthropology
      • HON165 Honors: Principles of Macroeconomics
      • HON274 Honors: Introduction to International Politics
      • PLS141 Introduction to International Politics
      • SPN153 Latino Pop Culture
      • SPN204 Ideas & Cultures From the Hispanic-Speaking World
      • SPN385 Aspectos de la civilizacion hispana)

Foreign Languages (F)

Guide and prompt students to understand and demonstrate oral and written communication in a foreign language as well as awareness of a foreign culture.

      • CHN101 Beginner's Chinese
      • CHN102 Beginner's Chinese II
      • CHN103 Intermediate Chinese
      • FRN101 Beginning French I
      • FRN102 Beginning French II
      • FRN103 Intermediate French
      • FRN202 Intermediate French Conversation
      • FRN320 French for the Professions
      • GER101 Beginning German I
      • GER102 Beginning German II
      • GER103 Intermediate German
      • GER203 Intermediate German Communication
      • GER215 German for the Professions
      • SPN101 Beginning Spanish I
      • SPN102 Beginning Spanish II
      • SPN103 Intermediate Spanish
      • SPN202 Intermediate Conversation
      • SPN330 Spanish for the Professions

Citizenship and Responsibility

We want our students to consider the importance of Citizenship & Responsibility - 6 credits

This curriculum will provide students with opportunities to consider the function and development of institutions, as well as their own responsibilities in society. Tools for development of students as informed and responsible citizens can include study of principles and research in social science, analysis of the development of social and political systems and practices, application of critical analysis and reasoning, and contemplation of ethics and values. Each goal has an associated rubric that outlines what we expect students to learn or accomplish.

Students are required to complete two (2) courses (or their equivalents) in this curriculum, with no more than one (1) course being attributed with the same program goal.

Citizenship (S)

Guide and prompt students to understand responsible citizenship through the development of ideas of citizenship and rights, how society protect or fails to protect basic rights, and avenues for individual or collective action.

      • ESS108 Conservation of Natural Resources
      • HIS201 Early History of the United States
      • HON279 Honors: U.S. Government and Politics
      • PLS100 U.S. Government and Politics

Ethical Reasoning (E)

Guide and prompt students to identify ethical theories or guidelines and apply appropriate ethical reasoning to reach conclusions and support moral judgments.

      • HON105 Honors: Ethical Theories and Problems
      • PHL105 Ethical Theories and Problems

Critical Reasoning (R)

Guide and prompt students to use appropriate critical analysis and reasoning to explain and analyze concepts, and apply concepts to issues to determine significance or value.

      • ECO113 Principles of Economics
      • GEO140 Cultural Geography
      • HCS125 Survey of Communication Studies
      • HON130 Honors: Introduction to Philosophy
      • HON161 Honors: Introduction to Sociology: Society and Diversity
      • MAT225 Discrete Mathematics
      • PHL101 Introduction to Philosophy
      • PHL102 Critical Thinking
      • SOC101 Introduction to Sociology: Society and Diversity

Natural World and Technology

We want our students to better understand the Natural World and the Technologies that surround them – 9 credits

This curriculum will provide students the opportunity to learn how new knowledge is created by applying scientific principles and technology to address historical and contemporary questions. Two program goals express what we will do for students. Each goal has an associated rubric that outlines what we expect students to learn or accomplish.

Students must complete 3 courses in this curriculum, with at least two (2) courses (or their equivalents) involving the natural world (‘N’ rubric).

Natural World (N)

Guide and prompt students to understand the scientific method and resulting principles and theories, critically evaluating data to answer questions about the natural world.

      • ANT121 Physical Anthropology
      • BIO100 Basic Biology
      • BIO145 Environmental Biology
      • BIO150 Human Biology
      • BIO161 Principles of Biology: Cell Structure and Function
      • BIO162 Principles of Biology: Organismal Diversity
      • BIO208 Field Biology
      • BIO237 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
      • CHM103 Chemistry: A Cultural Approach
      • CHM105 Chemistry: An Observational Approach
      • CHM121 Chemical Bonding
      • ESS110 Introduction to Geology
      • ESS111 Introduction to the Atmosphere
      • ESS210 Physical Geology
      • HON108 Honors: Astronomy
      • HON142 Honors: Introduction to the Atmosphere
      • HON145 Honors: Environmental Biology
      • HON159 Honors: Physical Anthropology
      • HON180 Honors: Physics for Society
      • HON186 Honors: Human Biology
      • HON196 Honors: Chemistry: A Cultural Approach
      • HON244 Honors: Introduction to Geology
      • PHY108 Astronomy
      • PHY110 Physics for Society
      • PHY121 Introduction to Physics I
      • PHY122 Introduction to Physics II
      • PHY205 Intermediate Physics I
      • PHY221 Fundamentals of Physics I

Technology (T)

Guide and prompt students to acquire knowledge, skills, and competencies regarding a broad range of computer technologies and software, and to use them responsibly.

      • CSC103 Overview of Computer Science
      • CSC104 Programming in Python
      • CSC120 Introduction to Computer Science and Metacognition
      • CSC180 Microcomputer Basic
      • ECO102 Principles of Microeconomics
      • HON166 Honors: Principles of Microeconomics
      • HON182 Honors: Overview of Computer Science
      • MAT219 Data Science I

Creativity and Expression

We want our students to recognize and appreciate Creativity & Expression – 6 credits

This part of the curriculum will provide students with opportunities to explore artistic and literary disciplines and their modes of expression, considering the processes by which artistic works are imagined and created as well as the analytical tools for describing and appraising works of art and literature. Each goal has an associated rubric that outlines what we expect students to learn or accomplish.

Students must complete two (2) courses (or their equivalents) in this curriculum, with one (1) course being a literature course (‘L’ rubric)and one course in either the arts or creativity (‘A’ or ‘C’ rubrics).

Literature (L)

Guide and prompt students to comprehend, analyze, and determine the significance for works of literature.

      • ENG243 The Art of the Film
      • ENG248 Introduction to Culturally Diverse Literature of the United States
      • ENG250 Introduction to Literature
      • FRN330 Masterpieces of French Literature
      • FRN331 Masterpieces of Francophone Literature
      • GER151 German Cinema
      • HON101 Honors: Introduction to Theatre
      • HON224 Honors: The Art of the Film
      • HON249 Honors: Introduction to Literature
      • SPN152 Latino Literature
      • SPN360 Masterpieces of Spanish Literature
      • SPN361 Masterpieces of Spanish-American Literature
      • THE121 Introduction to Theatre

Arts (A)

Guide and prompt students to describe, analyze, and respond to the scope of works in the arts.

      • ART101 Art Appreciation
      • ART231 Art History I
      • ART232 Art History II
      • ART233 Art History III
      • ART339 History of American Art
      • MUS121 Introduction to Music
      • MUS129 American Popular Music
      • MUS227 Opera & Music Theatre
      • MUS261 World Music

Creative (C)

Guide and prompt students to demonstrate and apply creative competencies, problem solving and preparation in the realization of a creative work.

      • (none approved at this time)

General Education

For Students Enrolled Before Fall 2018

Education at a college or university has traditionally had two equally important components—depth and breadth. Depth is provided by the academic major which a student chooses and which prepares him or her for a useful vocation; breadth of knowledge is the concern and aim of the general education curriculum. Since men and women first began to discuss the nature and purpose of education, they have seen in it something more than the mere acquisition of specific knowledge or skills, important as these may be. This something they called a liberal or general education and the need for it has been based on the ideal that a breadth of knowledge is necessary for an individual to become an informed and literate member of society.

The following information is for students enrolled before Fall 2018. The University has adopted a New General Education Program that starts with students entering as first year students in the Fall 2018 semester.

Required Skills and Competencies

At Shippensburg, the study and investigation begins with the completion of courses, usually taken during a student’s first or second year at the university, in four required basic skills.

 To achieve these basic skills, undergraduates are required to take five courses for a total of 15 credit hours in the following areas:

      • Fluency in Writing. Students must take one of the following for 3 credit hours: ENG106 Writing Intensive First-Year Seminar, ENG101 College Writing or ENG110 Advanced Placement Writing.
      • Fluency in Speaking. Students must take HCS100 Introduction to Human Communication for 3 credit hours.
      • Mathematical Competency. Students must take one mathematics course numbered 100 or higher, for 3 credit hours, or must place at the Advanced Level through the university placement policy.
      • Historical Perspectives. Students must take the following two courses for a total of 6 credit hours: HIS105 World History I and HIS106 World History II.

Categories of Knowledge

The second component of the general education curriculum at Shippensburg is the completion of eleven courses distributed among five categories of knowledge.

Category A—Logic and Numbers for Rational Thinking (One course - 3 credit hours)

One course must be taken from any of the following, with the exception the mathematics course selected under Basic Skills and Competencies may not be used for this requirement.

      • CSC103 Overview of Computer Science
      • CSC104 Programming in Python
      • CSC120 Introduction to Computer Science and Metacognition
      • CSC180 Microcomputer Basic
      • CSC190 General Education Special Topics
      • CSC191 General Education Special Topics
      • MAT105 Mathematics for Liberal Studies
      • MAT107 Mathematics Models Applied to Money
      • MAT110 Fundamentals of Mathematics I
      • MAT117 Applied Statistics
      • MAT120 Basic Mathematics Models
      • MAT140A College Algebra - 4 Credits
      • MAT140B College Algebra - 3 Credits
      • MAT175 Precalculus
      • MAT181 Applied Calculus
      • MAT190 General Education Special Topics
      • MAT191 General Education Special Topics
      • MAT211 Calculus I
      • MAT217 Statistics I
      • PHL101 Introduction to Philosophy
      • PHL102 Critical Thinking
      • PHL105 Ethical Theories and Problems
      • PHL190 General Education Special Topics

Category B—Linguistic, Literary, Artistic and Cultural Traditions (Three courses - 9 credit hours)

One course must be taken from those listed under Literature and two courses in different disciplines from those listed under Humanities.

Literature (one course)  

      • ENG190 General Education Special Topics
      • ENG243 The Art of the Film
      • ENG248 Introduction to Culturally Diverse Literature of the United States
      • ENG250 Introduction to Literature
      • FRN330 Masterpieces of French Literature
      • FRN331 Masterpieces of Francophone Literature
      • GER151 German Cinema
      • GER320 Berlin
      • GER322 Readings in German Literature
      • SPN152 Latino Literature
      • SPN360 Masterpieces of Spanish Literature
      • SPN361 Masterpieces of Spanish-American Literature

Humanities (two courses – different disciplines)  

      • ART101 Art Appreciation
      • ART190 General Education Special Topics
      • ART231 Art History I
      • ART232 Art History II
      • ART233 Art History III
      • ART274 Introduction to Cultural Studio
      • ART339 History of American Art
      • CHN101 Beginner's Chinese
      • CHN102 Beginner's Chinese II
      • CHN103 Intermediate Chinese
      • COM190 General Education Special Topics
      • FL190 General Education Special Topics
      • FRN101 Beginning French I
      • FRN102 Beginning French II
      • FRN103 Intermediate French
      • FRN150 French Civilization
      • FRN190 General Education Special Topics
      • FRN202 Intermediate French Conversation
      • FRN204 Ideas & Cultures From the French-Speaking World
      • FRN320 French for the Professions
      • GER101 Beginning German I
      • GER102 Beginning German II
      • GER103 Intermediate German
      • GER150 German Civilization & Culture
      • GER190 General Education Special Topics
      • GER203 Intermediate German Communication
      • GER204 Ideas & Cultures From the German-Speaking World
      • GER215 German for the Professions
      • HCS190 General Education Special Topics
      • HIS190 General Education Special Topics
      • IAP111 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Arts
      • IAP190 General Education Special Topics
      • MUS121 Introduction to Music
      • MUS129 American Popular Music
      • MUS190 General Education Special Topics
      • MUS227 Opera & Music Theatre
      • MUS261 World Music
      • SOC370 Sociology of the Arts
      • SPN101 Beginning Spanish I
      • SPN102 Beginning Spanish II
      • SPN103 Intermediate Spanish
      • SPN150 Spanish Civilization & Culture
      • SPN153 Latino Popular Culture
      • SPN190 General Education Special Topics
      • SPN202 Intermediate Conversation
      • SPN204 Ideas & Cultures From the Hispanic-Speaking World
      • SPN215 Intermediate Spanish for Heritage and Native Speakers
      • SPN330 Spanish for the Professions
      • SPN385 Aspectos de la civilizacion hispana
      • THE121 Introduction to Theatre
      • THE190 General Education Special Topics

Category C—Biological and Physical Sciences (Three courses - 9 credit hours)

One course must be taken from those listed in three of the following disciplines.

      • ANT121 Physical Anthropology
      • BIO100 Basic Biology
      • BIO142 Introduction to Ecology
      • BIO145 Environmental Biology
      • BIO150 Human Biology
      • BIO161 Principles of Biology: Cell Structure and Function
      • BIO162 Principles of Biology: Organismal Diversity
      • BIO190 General Education Special Topics
      • BIO191 General Education Special Topics
      • BIO208 Field Biology
      • BIO237 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
      • CHM103 Chemistry: A Cultural Approach
      • CHM105 Chemistry: An Observational Approach
      • CHM121 Chemical Bonding
      • ESS108 Conservation of Natural Resources
      • ESS110 Introduction to Geology
      • ESS111 Introduction to the Atmosphere
      • ESS190 General Education Special Topics
      • ESS191 General Education Special Topics
      • ESS210 Physical Geology
      • PHY108 Astronomy
      • PHY110 Physics for Society
      • PHY121 Introduction to Physics I
      • PHY122 Introduction to Physics II
      • PHY190 General Education Special Topics
      • PHY205 Intermediate Physics I

Category D—Political, Economic and Geographic Sciences (Two courses - 6 credit hours)

One course must be taken from those listed in two of the following disciplines.

      • ECO101 Principles of Macroeconomics
      • ECO102 Principles of Microeconomics
      • ECO113 Principles of Economics
      • ECO190 General Education Special Topics
      • GEO101 World Geography
      • GEO103 Geography of the United States and Canada
      • GEO190 General Education Special Topics
      • PLS100 U.S. Government and Politics
      • PLS141 Introduction to International Politics
      • PLS190 General Education Special Topics

Category E—Social and Behavioral Sciences (Two courses - 6 credit hours)

One course must be taken from those listed in two of the following disciplines.

      • ANT105 Great Discoveries in Archaeology
      • ANT111 Cultural Anthropology
      • ANT190 General Education Special Topics
      • DS100 Introduction to Diversity Studies
      • ETH100 Introduction to Ethnic Studies
      • ETH101 Introduction to African American Studies
      • ETH102 Introduction to Latino Studies
      • ETH190 General Education Special Topics
      • GEO140 Cultural Geography
      • HCS125 Survery of Communication Studies
      • HCS190 General Education Special Topics
      • INT190 General Education Special Topics
      • PSY101 General Psychology
      • SOC101 Introduction to Sociology: Society and Diversity
      • SOC190 General Education Special Topics
      • WST100 Introduction to Women’s Studies
      • WST190 General Education Special Topics

University Diversity Requirement

Shippensburg University expects its students to understand the diverse nature of the United States—its currently diverse society as well as its diverse historical and cultural roots. Students should also gain awareness of how the country continues to emerge and be shaped by 

the interaction of people with different views. Finally, students should understand how cultural, ethnic and racial heritage, as well as gender, age, social class, sexual orientation, and abilities have shaped their attitudes, perspectives, beliefs, and values.  To complete the university diversity requirement, undergraduates are required to take one approved diversity course for a total of 3 credit hours. The following courses currently satisfy the university’s diversity requirement.
  • ART101 Art Appreciation
  • CRJ452 Race, Ethnicity, and Crime
  • DS100 Introduction to Disability Studies
  • ECH460 Family, School, and Community Partnerships
  • EEC273 Introduction to Exceptionalities: Understanding Diverse Learners
  • ENG248 Introduction to Culturally Diverse Literature of the United States
  • ETH100 Introduction to Ethnic Studies
  • ETH101 Introduction to African American Studies
  • ETH102 Introduction to Latino Studies
  • GEO103 Geography of the U.S. and Canada
  • GEO140 Cultural Geography
  • HIS201 Early History of the United States
  • HIS342 U.S. Immigration and Ethnicity
  • MGT447 Business and Society
  • SOC101 Introduction to Sociology: Society and Diversity
  • SWK265 Understanding Diversity for Social Work Practice
  • WST100 Introduction to Women’s Studies

More Information

For more information on the General Education program requirements, see the undergraduate catalog.