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Contact Information

Dr. Dara Bergel-Bourassa
dpbourassa@ship.edu
Director, Gerontology Program
Office: Shippen Hall 325
(717) 477-1969

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Project Linus

...providing security through blankets.

ABOUT PROJECT LINUS

BlanketProject Linus was named after the adorable security blanket-toting character from the Peanuts comic strip. Creator Charles Schultz was aware of our efforts and delighted to have Linus inspire blanket makers to help comfort children in need. Project Linus is a 100% non-profit organizations, dedicated to "Providing Security Through Blankets," for ill or traumatized children and teens. Inspired by a picture of a three-year-old cancer patient holding her security blanket, Project Linus was begun in 1995 by Karen Loucks-Baker. Project Linus has donated more than 400,000 handmade blankets to help comfort children in need in hospitals, shelters and hospices. Project Linus has over 300 chapters in the United States, Canada, Australia and Mexico.

ABOUT THE SHIPPENSBURG UNIVERSITY CHAPTER

The chapter at Shippensburg University is a little different than most. One of the missions of the Gerontology Program is to "foster an intergenerational respect and dialogue throughout the University community." Project Linus provides the opportunity to involve the social work majors, the gerontology minors, and senior citizens in a joint effort to make blankets and find traumatized children in need of them. It creates interaction and communication between children, college students and senior citizens-truly an intergenerational dialogue. Project Linus at Shippensburg University is a service project, a volunteer effort, and a labor of love-on everyone's part. Patches are available as rewards to "blanketeers."

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Anyone, any age, can help these children. Make a blanket and donate it to the Shippensburg University chapter of Project Linus. Invite a Shippensburg Project Linus representative to speak to your organization.

BLANKETS

Patch"The best kind of sleep under heaven above, is under a blanket handmade with love." Blankets should be made of new washable materials (do not use wool) in child to teen-friendly colors. Blankets can be 30 x 36 inches for infants, or 40" by 60" for older kids, or 52" by 52". (40" by 60" is the ideal size) Blankets may be knitted, crocheted or quilted.  A label with a picture of Linus and the phrase "Made With Tender Loving Care For Project Linus" is sewn on each blanket.