Course Offerings

Fall Semester 2018 Spring Semester 2019  

Fall 2018

  

HON 100:  Honors Introduction to Human Communication (equivalent to HCS 100:  Introduction to Human Communication)

Gen. Ed. Category: Required Skills and Competencies  
MWF 12:00 p.m. - 12:50 p.m.

This course is designed with two primary goals. First, as an introductory course, Introduction to Human Communication introduces you to the field of human communication and provides you with the background to pursue upper-level courses in Communication. Accordingly, this course focuses on communication contexts, vocabulary, and basic theories of the discipline to provide you with a foundation for advanced study. In addition to public speaking, we survey important features in the study of all human communication, including language, conflict, climates, culture, and gender, and we locate specific study within the contexts of interpersonal and group communication. Second, as an introduction to a humanistic field of study, this course seeks to provide application of theory in order to further your skills as communicators, and abilities as critical thinkers. Consequently, this course focuses on experiential learning in order to demonstrate the purpose and practicality of academic inquiry.

HON 106:  Honors Writing Intensive First-Year Seminar (equivalent to ENG 114:  Writing Intensive First-Year Seminar)

Gen. Ed. Category:  Required Skills and Competencies
Dr. Sharon Harrow
TR 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
TR 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

The goal of this course is teach you what it means to be a Public Intellectual: a scholar whose particular academic training helps him or her to contribute to the larger world. We will examine the discourse, or language, of your chosen field, and you will develop the rhetorical skills you need to write well within your own discipline. However, this course will do more than simply teach you to write well; you will learn how writing acts as a force of change in the world. You will also learn how and why it is important to present your ideas in a public forum and thus will be required to present your research in class. You will also write several mock conference proposals. This will help you to think of your work as part of a conversation beyond the classroom.

HON 113: Honors First Year Seminar (equivalent to UNIV 101:  First Year Seminar)

Gen. Ed. Category: Required Skills and Competencies
Dr. Christine Senecal
MWF 8:00 a.m. - 8:50 a.m.
MWF 9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
MWF 10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.

HON 111:  Honors Introduction to Interdisciplinary Arts (equivalent to IAP 111:  Introduction to Interdisciplinary Arts)

Gen. Ed. Category:  B
Dr. Margaret Lucia
MW 5:00 p.m. - 6:15 p.m.

This course introduces the variety of the creative and performing arts —theater, music, painting, sculpture, dance, photography, literature, and TV/film — and demonstrates the ways in which these arts can influence and enhance one another. Through class discussion and multimedia presentations, guest lectures by arts practitioners, and attendance at arts events, students learn how to better appreciate and respond to the different artistic media by exploring the ways in which a creation in one art form can inspire re-creation in another. Assessment items include a student arts journal, a multimedia arts project and presentation, written event critiques, and unit exams. The course satisfies a Category B General Education: Humanities requirement and is an introductory course for the Interdisciplinary Arts major.

HON 145:  Honors Environmental Biology (equivalent to BIO 145:  Environmental Biology)

Gen. Ed. Category:  C
Dr. Timothy Maret
MW 2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

This course provides an introduction to the basics of environmental biology and explores the ways that humans have impacted the environment. Topics covered include issues related to human population growth and overconsumption, climate change, conservation, as well as basic ecology, biodiversity, and evolutionary biology. Sustainable solutions to these problems will also be explored. This course spans numerous disciplines including biology, earth science, sociology, economics, and politics. As part of this course, students will help research and develop solutions for environmental issues on campus and in our community and will be provided with hands-on experiences to reinforce topics covered throughout the semester.

HON 141:  Honors World Geography (equivalent to GEO 101:  World Geography)

Gen. Ed. Category:  D
Dr. Alison Feeney
TR 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

In this course we will examine patterns and processes that define human settlement in various places around the world. We will examine the historical context to help identify relationships between societies and their environments, and the spatial patterns that have emerged within those societies. Topics that will be examined include: location, population, landforms, ecology, culture, natural resources and settlement patterns. While we will cover the same content as in the regular general education World Regional course, I will try to present the information in a different manner with many group learning opportunities, student presentations, and hands-on computer projects.

HON 151:  Honors Introduction to Psychology (equivalent to PSY 101:  Introduction to Psychology)

Gen. Ed. Category:  E
Dr. Kathryn Potoczak
MW 3:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

Why do people do the things they do? The many answers to this question and many more questions are the focus of this course. Students will actively explore some of the major principles, concepts and applications of contemporary psychology. We will cover some of the traditional topics such as learning, development, states of consciousness as well as the controversial issues in the field of Psychology. Bring your critical thinking skills, your motivation and your curiosity; be prepared for an exciting adventure in learning about people.

Upper-Division Courses

HON 397:  Honors Selected Topics:  Leadership, Social Change, and History

Dr. Steven Burg
TR 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Counts as one of the required Honors Seminars.  Also counts as a 300-level elective for history majors and minors.  Open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

How do citizens in a democracy bring about meaningful change? What roles can and should individuals fill as both leaders and followers? What is the relationship between democracy, voting, and citizenship? And what determines whether a leader or movement's ideas will succeed or fail?  This interactive seminar explores the nature of effective leadership and the process of social change by examining leadership theory and historical case studies, including selected studies of winners of the Nobel Peace Prize. Additionally, the class will plan, organize, and execute a major campus event called "Democracy Day" focused on helping Shippensburg University students to consider the relationship between elections, voting, and social change. Finally, the class members will have an opportunity to research and nominate their own candidate for the Nobel Peace Prize, and to join together for a festive Nobel Day celebration (complete with authentic Norwegian food) as the Nobel Peace Prize is awarded in December 2018.

HON 440:  Honors Seminar:  Business and Society (equivalent to MGT 447:  Business and Society)

Dr. Wendy Becker
MW 5:00 p.m. - 6:15 p.m. 
Counts as one of the required Honors seminars. Should be taken by all Honors juniors and seniors majoring or minoring in business. 

Examines the role of business in a societal system including interrelationships with government, the community, employees, and other stakeholder groups. Major focus areas include the social responsibility of business, diversity in the workplace, and business ethics. Consideration is also given to such topics as global and environmental issues, and the impact of governmental regulations.


Spring 2019

 

HON 100:  Honors Introduction to Human Communication (equivalent to HCS 100: Introduction to Human Communication)

Gen. Ed. Category: Required Skills and Competencies
TR 8:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.

This course is designed with two primary goals. First, as an introductory course, Introduction to Human Communication introduces you to the field of human communication and provides you with the background to pursue upper-level courses in Communication. Accordingly, this course focuses on communication contexts, vocabulary, and basic theories of the discipline to provide you with a foundation for advanced study. In addition to public speaking, we survey important features in the study of all human communication, including language, conflict, climates, culture, and gender, and we locate specific study within the contexts of interpersonal and group communication. Second, as an introduction to a humanistic field of study, this course seeks to provide application of theory in order to further your skills as communicators, and abilities as critical thinkers. Consequently, this course focuses on experiential learning in order to demonstrate the purpose and practicality of academic inquiry.

HON 122: Honors Historical Foundation of Global Cultures (equivalent to HIS 105: Historical Foundation of Global Cultures)

Gen. Ed. Category: Required Skills and Competencies
Dr. Christine Senecal
MWF 9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
MWF 10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.

History is the study of the past, but it is certainly not immutable. What college freshmen were required to learn in their courses a few generations ago has changed considerably. Obviously, the past has not changed, but what historians have thought is important for you to study certainly has. To illustrate, in this course we will focus on important trends in the history of the world, beginning with humanity's earliest origins and ending around 1500 of the Common Era (C.E.). In other times and places, the stress of undergraduate history has been on Western Europe. Thus, we can see that even though the past might not change, history--the study of the past--does, depending on who tells the story.

HON 249: Honors Introduction to Literature (equivalent to ENG 250: Introduction to Literature)

Gen Ed. Category: B
Dr. Thomas Crochunis
TR 2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

This course will be a unique academic and field experience, using New York as a laboratory for exploring the origins, dislocations, and new social configurations associated with the rise of modernity. We will also examine some of the most enduring literary and artistic achievements of our time. Students enrolled in this course or Honors World History II will have the option to take part in a five-day, four-night field trip to New York so that they can experience firsthand some of the neighborhoods, buildings, parks, and food that have inspired the writers and historical actors whom we are studying. Throughout the semester, students will work in small groups on more specific projects relating to their majors and/or proclivities: music, art, immigration, architecture, the Harlem Renaissance, beat poetry, theater, bridges - you get the idea. Some possible texts: Washington Square by Henry James, The Age of Innocence OR The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Golden Spur by Dawn Powell.

HON 108:  Honors Astronomy (equivalent to PHY 108: Astronomy)

Gen Ed. Category: C
Dr. Allen Armstrong
MWF 8:00 a.m. - 8:50 a.m.

Fundamental principles of geology will be addressed in a lecture format aided by labs and homework exercises.  As a Category C General Education course lecture will often follow the history of scientific inquiry to demonstrate the scientific method, and labs will employ fundamental mathematical concepts to solve basic problems in the earth sciences.   Topics will include geologic time, rock and mineral identification, global geologic processes (including tectonics, volcanism, earthquakes, and mountain building), surficial processes of water, wind, and ice that shape the earth’s surface, and topographic map interpretation. 
 

HON 279:  Honors U.S. Government and Politics (equivalent to PLS 100:  U.S. Government and Politics)

Gen Ed Category: D
Dr. Mike Moltz
MW 2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

This course provides a foundation for understanding the philosophical heritage, constitutional principles, civil rights and liberties, and the formal and informal institutions that form the U.S. government.  We focus on the political factors and dynamics of democracy, the Constitution, political parties, interest groups, the media, elections, and the branches of U.S. government.  Among our learning objectives are mastering the basic concepts of the American political system, understanding how American political institutions work, and critically analyzing the interplay of/among political institutions and political actors.
 

HON 161: Honors Introduction to Sociology:  Society and Diversity (equivalent to SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology:  Society and Diversity)

Gen Ed Category: E
Dr. Lawrence Eppard
MWF 10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.

Sociology is a social science that tries to connect personal issues with public issues. We look “behind the curtain” to examine how systems of power and privilege influence our everyday activities. My research field is Mexican immigration. In our class this semester, we will examine the invisible labor force that sustains our standard of living.Do you know where your food comes from? Who harvests it? Are you aware of the behind-the-scenes immigrant labor that supports us? You will learn about the lives and journeys of people who put the food on our tables, clean our hotel rooms, trim our hedges, and care for our children. Using a sociological perspective, we will connect our personal lives with their lives by listening to their voices. As a group, we will interview local migrant workers and share their stories with the Ship community. Along the way, you will learn the core concepts and research methods in the discipline of sociology.

Upper-Division Courses

HON 392:  Honors Seminar:  Paris Through Franco-American Eyes:  Perspectives on the French Global City

Dr. Blandine Mitaut
T 6:30 p.m. - 9:15 p.m.

France and the United States have maintained a complicated relationship fed by mutual fascination and animosity. This course explores the tumultuous bond between the two nations beyond stereotypes, using the city of Paris as its center stage. Starting with Benjamin Franklin’s arrival in Paris in 1776 which led to the unlikely alliance between the American revolutionaries and the French monarchy, we will retrace the French capital’s vivid history. More specifically we will focus on the evolution of Paris from symbol of modernity in the 19th century, to its internationalization in the 20th century and the current challenges it faces in the age of globalization. Through the lens of Paris, French and American responses to issues of conflict, social tension, race, religion will be compared and contrasted in order to understand the deeper values and ideologies associated with each culture. This interdisciplinary course will use literature, history and film as primary sources but will also draw upon the academic disciplines of art, cultural studies and sociology.
 

PLS 348:  Applied Diplomacy:  Model Organization of America States

Dr. Mark Sachleben
MWF 11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.
Counts as one of the required Honors Seminars. Open to Honors sophomores, juniors, and seniors and other students by the permission of the instructor. Counts as major credit for Political Science and International Studies majors and minors. Please note that there is a required application process for this course.

The Model Organization of American States (MOAS) is a simulation that allows students from several universities from the Western Hemisphere to come together and discuss problems and topics that affect countries in the Americas. In order to prepare for the simulation, students spend the semester researching the country that they will represent, the OAS, and the issues that confront the region.

Prior to the beginning of the simulation, students receive a briefing at the embassy or mission of their country. Often times this briefing is from a high-level representative of their country and affords students the opportunity to engage in a question and answer session with a person who is actually working on the issues that the students are researching. Work sessions occur in a hotel conference center and at OAS headquarters in Washington, D.C. The students work on topics as diverse as economic development and planning, security, international law, human rights, education, social issues, labor practices, and environmental protection.

HON 411: Introduction to Exceptionalities (equivalent to EEC 273: Introduction to Exceptionalities)

Dr. Christopher Schwilk
TR 5:00 p.m. - 6:15 p.m.
Counts as one of the required Honors Seminars. Open to Honors sophomores, juniors, and seniors. This is a required course for Education Majors. Multiple clearances are needed for this course.

This course provides students in education and other related areas a background in the field of special education and the nature of exceptionality in children and youth. Emphasis is placed on societal attitudes and practices in relation to persons with exceptionalities, current practices in identifying and classifying children and youth with exceptionalities, characteristics of all exceptional population groups, programmatic needs of individuals with exceptionalities, and issues and trends in the various fields that affect diagnosis, classification, and programming or service delivery. The knowledge base for the course content comes out of social, cognitive, and developmental psychology, medical aspects of exceptionality, educational law and policy, and special education.