2015 Summer Tuition Info


2014-2015 Tuition for Undergraduate Courses: 

$284 per credit, in-state
$290 per credit, out-of-state, online class
$639 per credit, out-of-state, face-to-face class

2014-2015 Tuition for Graduate Courses:
$454 per credit, in-state
$463 per credit, out-of-state, online class
$681 per credit, out-of-state, face-to-face class

For information about fees, other tuition rates, and payments visit Student Accounts.

spacer image

Student Success Stories

Dean's Message

spacer image

PCDE Contact Info

Horton Hall Room 108 
1871 Old Main Drive
Shippensburg University
Shippensburg, PA, 17257
(717) 477-1502
pcde@ship.edu 

Like ShipPCDE on Facebook!  Follow #ShipPCDE on Twitter!


Inquiry Form 


PCDE Registration Info


PCDE Withdrawal Form

spacer image

K-12 Educators Institute
Summer Course Offerings

* Registration for Summer 2015 begins Monday, March 23, 2015 *

CURRENT or PREVIOUS SHIPPENSBURG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS: Current Shippensburg University students can register for summer classes by logging into the MyShip portal at https://my.ship.edu  using their Shippensburg University email address and password.

If you took any K-12 Educators Institute courses last summer and do not remember your login information, please email pcde@ship.edu for assistance. Please check back periodically, information will be updated daily.

NON-DEGREE STUDENTS: Individuals may enroll in Shippensburg University classes without being a degree-seeking student as long as they meet the University’s academic requirements (as described in the undergraduate  and graduate  catalogs), have completed the prerequisite coursework for the particular course in which they would like to enroll, and are enrolling in a class that permits non-degree students to do so.  Non-degree seeking individuals may enroll in a summer class by following the directions at http://www.ship.edu/PCDE/Non-Degree/.

These courses are restricted to K-12 educators or graduate students with departmental approval. No undergraduate students will be permitted in these courses.

Looking for a subject or specific need?  Please contact Dr. Carolyn Callaghan at 717-477-1502

 

Summer 2015 K-12 Institute Courses 

(Select course name below to jump to section for more details) 

Art(View Flyer) History
Communication / Journalism /  Media
Mathematics 
Counseling  |  ( View Flyer)
Organizational Development Leadership
Early Childhood Education Special Education
Educational Leadership Reading
Additional Courses of Interest Teacher Education




ART

 

ART490-71 Selected Topics: Conceptual Paintings - 3 Credits  

CRN - 41176 (Summer A)
June 15 - 19, 2015; Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Shippensburg University, 215 & 203 Huber Art Center, Painting Studio
Michael Campbell, MFA, Professor of Art and Design

This course focuses on defining conceptual paintings.  The paintings generated will investigate a diversity of processes and representations to expand content.  The student will select his or her own personal content,  paint media (watercolor, acrylic, oil, tempera, or encaustic), and support(s).  This course of study will explore both additive and subtractive painting methods.  The student will have the option of working on other painting skills during the course. An optional day trip to art galleries in New York City or Philadelphia will be scheduled to see contemporary painting themes expressed through a variety of styles and media (Wednesday, June 17th).

An optional four-day residency program is available with this course.  This involves a four day intense class schedule with evening class hours: Monday and Tuesday 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. and then 6 - 10 p.m.; Wednesday 6:30 a.m. - 11 p.m. (optional NYC trip); and Thursday 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. with an individual critique with Professor Campbell at 1 p.m.

NOTE:  There is an additional cost for the optional trip.  A suggested materials list is mailed upon enrollment. 

ART491-71 Selected Topics: Mixed Media Drawings- 3 Credits

CRN - 41159 (Summer A)
June 22 - June 26, 2015; Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Shippensburg University, 215 & 203 Huber Art Center, Painting Studio
Michael Campbell, MFA, Professor of Art and Design

This course focuses on exploring mixed media drawing. Drawing techniques and the appropriate supports will be determined by the student selected media. Students will create mixed media drawings with content of personal interest. Students will be encouraged to experiment with a variety of dry and wet media (black, white and color) and tools (brush, pen, stick) while developing a series of mixed media drawings. The student will have the option of working on other types of drawing and their techniques during the course. An optional day trip to art galleries in New York City or Philadelphia will be scheduled to see contemporary painting themes expressed through a variety of styles and media (Wednesday, June 24).

An optional four-day residency program is available with this course. This involves a four day intense class schedule with evening class hours: Monday and Tuesday 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. and then 6 - 10 p.m.; Wednesday 6:30 a.m. - 11 p.m. (optional NYC trip); and Thursday 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. with an individual critique with Professor Campbell at 1 p.m.

NOTE: There is an additional cost for the optional trip. A suggested materials list is mailed upon enrollment. 

ART492-71 Selected Topics: Combining Drawing with Painting - 3 Credits

CRN - 41160 (Summer A)
June 29 - July 3, 2015; Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Shippensburg University, 215 & 213 Huber Annex, Drawing Studio
Michael Campbell, MFA, Professor of Art and Design

This course focuses on investigating methods for combining drawing with painting. The student will identify their own content and then through experimentation and development will combine drawing with painting. The student will select his or her own drawing and paint media (watercolor, acrylic, oil, tempera, or encaustic), tools, techniques, and support(s). The student will have the option of working on other drawing/painting skills during the course and producing other non-Narrative paintings. An optional day trip to art galleries in New York City or Philadelphia will be scheduled to see contemporary drawing themes expressed through a variety of styles and media (Wednesday, July 1).

An optional four-day residency program is available with this course. This involves a four day intense class schedule with evening class hours: Monday and Tuesday 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. and then 6 - 10 p.m.; Wednesday 6:30 a.m. - 11 p.m. (optional NYC trip); and Thursday 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. with an individual critique with Professor Campbell at 1 p.m.

NOTE: There is an additional cost for the NYC trip. A suggested materials list is mailed upon enrollment. 

ART493-71 Selected Topics: Contemporary Stone Sculptural Methods for the Artist/Educator - 3 Credits

CRN - 41161 (Summer A)
June 22 - June 26, 2015; Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Shippensburg University, Huber Art Center Sculpture Studio
Steve Dolbin, MFA, Professor of Art and Design

An intense process driven investigation of the sculptural possibilities of stone.  This course is designed to give K-12 Art Educators hands on experience in the areas of cutting and carving stone as well the techniques of hand, electric and pneumatic finishing of stone.

Emphasis on the concept of sculptural form and its significance in aesthetic exploration. It is hoped that students will better understand form and the development of sculpture in stone.  Students will observe the natural world for reference and example. Students will also be exposed to our human made world and its constructs (architecture, engineering, etc). Students should develop an awareness of varied form making processes and how they affect both aesthetic and function.

ART494-75 Selected Topics: Figure Sculpture and Drawing for the Artist/Educator - 3 Credits

CRN - 42113 (Summer B)
July 6 - July 10, 2015; Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Shippensburg University, Huber Arts Center Drawing Studio
Steve Dolbin, MFA, Professor of Art and Design

The aim of this course is to explore a cross section of traditional and contemporary drawing/modeling processes.  It is anticipated that the subject will emerge with a clearer understanding of the human figure as a subject or vehicle for creative expression.  The class consists of intense studio activity as well as lecture, demonstration and critique.

ART495-75 Selected Topics: Contemporary Metal Sculptural Methods for the Artist/Educator - 3 Credits

CRN - 42114 (Summer B)
July 13 - July 17, 2015; Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Shippensburg University, Huber Art Center Sculpture Studio
Steve Dolbin, MFA, Professor of Art and Design

An intense process driven investigation of the sculptural possibilities of metal.  This course is designed to give K-12 Art Educators hands on experience in the areas of forging and welding metal as well the techniques of hand, electric and pneumatic finishing of metal.

Emphasis on the concept of sculptural form and its significance in aesthetic exploration. It is hoped that students will better understand form and the development of sculpture in metal.  Students will observe the natural world for reference and example. Students will also be exposed to our human made world and its constructs (architecture, engineering, etc). Students should develop an awareness of varied form making processes and how they affect both aesthetic and function.

ART496-75 Selected Topics: Contemporary Wood Sculptural Methods for the Artist/Educator - 3 Credits

CRN - 42115 (Summer B)
July 20 - July 24, 2015; Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Shippensburg University, Huber Art Center Sculpture Studio
Steve Dolbin, MFA, Professor of Art and Design

An intense process driven investigation of the sculptural possibilities of wood.  This course is designed to give K-12 Art Educators hands on experience in the areas of selecting, preparing, fabricating and carving wood as well the techniques of hand, electric and pneumatic finishing of wood.

Emphasis on the concept of sculptural form and its significance in aesthetic exploration. It is hoped that students will better understand form and the development of sculpture in wood.  Students will observe the natural world for reference and example. Students will also be exposed to our human made world and its constructs (architecture, engineering, etc). Students should develop an awareness of varied form making processes and how they affect both aesthetic and function.


Communication / Journalism / Media


COM526-61 Emerging Mass Media Technologies - 3 Credits

CRN - 41111 (Summer A)
May 18 - June 19, 2015; This course is completely online.
Dr. Ted Carlin, Professor, Communication/Journalism Department

Reviews and analyzes the role of developing and future telecommunications media technologies and their implication for today's media and society.

COM536-65 World Broadcasting Systems - 3 credits

CRN - 42075 (Summer B)
June 29 - July 31, 2015; This course is completely online.

Comparative study of international broadcasting program policies, economic systems, control, and organizations. The use of broadcasting in international affairs as an instrument of propaganda, culture, and information dissemination.  Monitoring of domestic and foreign broadcast agencies.


Counseling


CNS 528 Assessment from a Family Systems Perspective 

CRN - 42116 (Summer B)
July 7 – August 7, 2015
Week 1: online component
Week 2 – 5:  Tuesday & Thursdays; 5:30 – 9 p.m.
Tara Byers, MS LPC, Instructor, Counseling & College Student Personnel


This course is not intended to explore psychometric theory but rather to introduce students to contemporary models and strategies for integrating appropriate assessment measures into work with children, couples and families. Diagnostic, evaluative and treatment assessment paradigms will be explored as they pertain to family systems based counseling. Current controversies about assessment in family systems counseling will be discussed. 
 

CNS596-75 Selected Topics: Awareness Through Counseling and Spirituality - 3 Credits  

CRN - 42116 (Summer B)
June 29 - July 31, 2015; Mondays and Wednesdays, 5:50 - 9:15 p.m.
Shippensburg University, Shippen Hall 100
Dr. Andrew Carey, Professor, Counseling & College Student Personnel

This course emphasizes awareness as the foundation for true change.  All counseling theories have their own framework for achieving change with clients, but they all have one element in common. All are designed to facilitate client awareness. This course capitalizes on that crucial foundation by integrating spirituality into the counseling process. True spirituality, as emphasized in this course, encourages awareness of "what is" in life rather than resisting or trying to change life circumstances. Awareness increases people's grace or ability to respond effectively to life.

CNS596-71 Selected Topics: Integrated Care and Psychopharmacology from a Counseling Perspective - 3 Credits

CRN - 41162 (Summer A)
May 18 - June 26, 2015; Wednesdays, 6 - 9 p.m. with an online component
Dixon University Center, Harrisburg, PA
Deanna Lynn Bridge Najera, MPAS, MS, PA-C, Instructor, Counseling & College Student Personnel

Medicine and Mental Health are becoming more closely aligned than ever before. This is because physical and mental health are being addressed as a true single entity.  The focus of this post-masters course is to assist the practicing clinician and the advanced level student to work within the Integrated or Collaborative Care team serving the patient/client. Common disorders, diseases and conditions with mental health components will be described and care approaches will be discussed. A basic introduction of psychopharmacology as it relates to professional counselors will also be conducted. Students will develop and improve the skills necessary to stay well-informed of the latest developments in the field of medicine as it applies to mental health. This course is for individuals who are already familiar with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV or DSM 5).  This highly interactive course will be taught as a hybrid with in-class as well as online required attendance.


Early Childhood Education


ECH540-65 Families and Early Childhood Education - 3 Credits

CRN - 42078 (Summer B)
June 29 - July 31, 2015: This course is completely online.
Dr. Jennifer Pyles, Assistant Professor, Teacher Education Department

Examines theory and research from the area of family studies. Emphasis is on characteristics of families with young children and how early childhood practitioners can best apply this information in their work settings. Field assignments are required.

ECH520-11 Social and Emotional Development in Early Childhood - 3 Credits

CRN - 41088 (Summer A)
May 18 - June 5, 2015; Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. - noon
Shippensburg University, Shippen Hall 250
Dr. Laureen Nelson, Assistant Professor, Teacher Education Department

Examines current research and theory about social and emotional development in young children, birth through eight years. Emphasis is on classroom practices, including instruction and discipline, which facilitate healthy social and emotional development in young children. Field experiences are required.

ECH530-21 Cognitive and Language Development in Early Childhood Education - 3 Credits

CRN - 42064
June 29 - July 31, 2015; Tuesdays, Wednesdays & Thursdays, 4 - 7 p.m.
Shippensburg University, Shippen Hall 260
Dr. Kent Chrisman, Professor, Teacher Education Department

Examines current research and theory about cognitive and language development in young children, birth through eight years. Emphasis is on classroom practices, including instruction and discipline, which facilitate cognitive and language development in young children. Field experiences are required.

ECH563-61 Leadership in Early Childhood Education - 3 credits

CRN - 41115 (Summer A)
May 18 - June 19, 2015: This course is completely online.
Dr. Kent Chrisman, Professor, Teacher Education Department

Designed to prepare personnel to function in the role of administrator of early childhood programs. Examines types of early childhood programs and their underlying rationales, ways of establishing early childhood programs, methods of funding and financing programs, and considers the coordinating role of the administrator in working with other personnel.


Special Education 


EEC490-75 Selected Topics: American Sign Language I - 3 credits

CRN - 42158 (Summer B)
June 29 - August 7 / Tuesdays & Thursdays from 5 pm - 8 pm
Dixon University Center, Harrisburg PA

This course introduces the basics of American Sign Language (ASL). The course is designed for students with no or minimal sign language skills to develop basic skills in use of ASL and knowledge of Deaf culture.  Emphasis is upon acquisition of comprehension, production and interaction skills using basic grammatical features.  ASL will be taught within contexts related to general surroundings and everyday life experience.

EEC543-75 Selected Topics: Special Education Careers - 3 Credits

CRN - 42160 (Summer B)
June 15 - July 10 Face-to-face with an online component
Face-to-Face Mtgs: June 16, 18, 23,25, and July 8 from 5:30 - 9 pm
Online Mtgs: June 17,22, 24, 29, 30 and July 6 & 7        
Dixon University Center, Harrisburg, PA w/online component
Dr. Christopher Schwilk, Associate Professor & Department Chair
Educational Leadership and Special Education Department

Special education teachers spend years preparing for their professional careers.  Most of these teachers believe that they will always be classroom teachers, but factors including burn-out, family situations, and the desire for a new challenge often leave teachers wondering if they should a new job in education or even a new career outside of education.  Those same teachers have highly developed skills that transfer well to other fields including social service and business.  Additionally, special educators have knowledge of legal issues, disabilities, and can provide meaningful specialized instruction.   This course explores the issues and opportunities outside of the traditional teacher role.  Students will explore career interests beyond the K-12 environment, and will learn what it takes to make a successful transition from school-age to work in a higher education setting, social services agency, or business, or to start a business.  Those interested in doctoral studies will have opportunities to talk with representatives from doctoral granting universities about their programs and financial support available.

EEC565-65 Instruction for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders - 3 credits

CRN - 42152 (Summer B)
July 5 - August 7, 2015: This course is completely online.
Dr. Kelly Carrero, Assistant Professor, Educational Leadership and Special Education Department

An advanced study of educational strategies and materials used with people who have autism spectrum disorders(ASDs). Introductory material will include learner characteristics and screening techniques. Explores instructional strategies and programming for individuals who have significant deficits in social communication and interactions; restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, and activities; and whose symptoms presented in early childhood. Current theories about etiology will be explored and analyzed. Intervention approaches will be described and analyzed.

EEC594-71 Selected Topics: Moving from Functional Behavior Assessment to Positive Behavior Support Plan and Beyond

CRN - 41221 (Summer A)
June 22 - July 3, 2015: 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Week 1: June 22, 24 & 26 (Monday, Wednesday & Friday)
Week 2: June 29 & July 1 (Monday & Wednesday)
Shippensburg University, Horton Hall 127
Dr. Kelly Carrero, Assistant Professor, Educational Leadership and Special Education Department

This course will prepare teachers to participate in the process of completing a culturally-responsive functional behavior assessment (FBA) and using the data to design and implement a legally-sound positive behavior support plan (PBSP) for a student with an individualized educational program (IEP).  Specifically, the course will review the (a) major principles of behavior, (b) seven major steps involved in completing a FBA for a student with challenging behaviors, (c) required elements of a legally-sound, data-driven PBSP, and (d) data collection techniques for monitoring the progress of the PBSP and informing any adjustments to the PBSP.




Educational Leadership


ELP490-71 Selected Topics: Educator in the Workplace - 3 Credits

CRN - 41199 (Summer A)
June 15 - June 19, 2015 with orientation meeting on May 21, 2015
Orientation Meeting on May 21 from 4:30 - 6:30 at York County Economic Alliance
June 15 & 19 from 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. at York County Economic Alliance
June 16 - 18: three 8 hr days w/educator in the workplace
York County Economic Alliance, 144 Roosevelt Ave., York PA
Dr. Jud Stauffer, Adjunct Faculty

Course will provide experience for educators in meeting the requirements of the proposed state academic standards for career education and work.  The course will provide relevant practical first-hand knowledge of business/industry workplace development, interest/career selection and relevancy issues into the curriculum.

ELP491-75 Selected Topics: Educating At-Risk Students: An Adlerian Approach - 3 Credits

CRN - 42137 (Summer B)
July 27 - July 31, 2015; Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Shippensburg University, Horton Hall 127
Dr. Wes Wingett, Adjunct Faculty

Participants in this course will be able to define high-risk behaviors in elementary, middle and secondary school students.  Participants will identify types and prevalence of high-risk behaviors and gather, process and apply information that is relevant and applicable to their educational venues with emphasis on identification, intervention, educational and prevention strategies.  Strategies will be based on current education literature and the psychology of Alfred Adler.

ELP510-71 Special Education Law - 3 Credits

CRN - 41198 (Summer A)
May 18 - June 5, 2015: Face-to-face with an online component
Face-to-face Mtgs: May 18, 20, 27, June 1 & 3 from 5:30 - 9 p.m.
Online Mtgs: May 19, 25, 26, June 2 & 4
Dixon University Center, Harrisburg, PA w/ online component
Dr. David Bateman, Professor, Educational Leadership and Special Education Department

Provides a comprehensive and current overview of the major federal laws and judicial interpretations of those laws that apply to the education of children with disabilities. Course includes discussions of inclusion, effective accommodations, IEPs, discipline, equal protection, and procedural due process. It also examines the six principles of the Individuals with Disabilities Act and Chapters 14, 15, and 16 of the Pennsylvania School Code.  Course helps students understand what the law requires so that they will become effective educational leaders capable of making appropriate decisions that comply with these laws.

ELP510-72 Special Education Law - 3 Credits

CRN - 41228 (Summer A) 
June 8 - June 26, 2015: Face-to-face with an online component 
Face-to-face Mtgs: June 8,10,17, 22, 24 from 5:30 - 9 pm  
Online Mtgs: June 9, 15,16, 23, 25 
Winebrenner Theological Seminary, Scotland, PA
Dr. David Bateman, Professor, Educational Leadership and Special Education Department

Provides a comprehensive and current overview of the major federal laws and judicial interpretations of those laws that apply to the education of children with disabilities. Course includes discussions of inclusion, effective accommodations, IEPs, discipline, equal protection, and procedural due process. It also examines the six principles of the Individuals with Disabilities Act and Chapters 14, 15, and 16 of the Pennsylvania School Code.  Course helps students understand what the law requires so that they will become effective educational leaders capable of making appropriate decisions that comply with these laws.

ELP515-21 Role of Research and Data Informed Decision-Making for School Leaders - 3 credits

CRN - 42052 (Summer B)
June 15 - July 10, 2015; Monday - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
Shippensburg University, Shippen Hall 160
Dr. Phil Diller, Associate Professor, Educational Leadership/Special Education Department

Designed to provide school administrators with the knowledge and skills necessary to be intelligent consumers and practitioners of research. Research designs, methods, and results are important tools for leadership and decision-making: administrators should be able to evaluate research studies and implement the findings. Requirements of federal legislation necessitates leadership that is, in part, derived from data-based decision making. Additionally, there may be situations in which an administrator is responsible for constructing a research proposal to qualify for a grant or to lead change in an educational program.

ELP517-75 Leadership in Technology & Effective Program Delivery - 3 Credits

CRN - 42118 (Summer B)
June 29 - August 7, 2015: Face-to-face with an online component
Face-to-face Mtgs: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
July 7, 9, 21, 23, August 4 & 6
Dixon University Center, Harrisburg PA, w/online component
Elaine Bergstresser, Adjunct Faculty, Educational Leadership and Special Education Department

Designed to provide future school administrators with the requisite skill sets and conceptual knowledge needed for effective 21st century leadership.  Understanding technology as a tool for learning, managing, analyzing, communicating, and collaborating is integral to successful school leadership at the classroom, building, and central office levels.  Topics explored include technology integration, digital citizenship, use of technology in systemic organization improvement, professional growth, digital culture, and visionary leadership.  In addition to developing personal philosophies regarding use of technology in teaching, learning, and leading, each student will develop a personal portfolio of resources.

ELP517-75 Leadership in Technology & Effective Program Delivery - 3 Credits

CRN - 42121 (Summer B)
July 6 - August 14, 2015: Face-to-face with an online component
Face-to-face Mtgs: Saturdays, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. and Sundays, 9 a.m. - noon
July 11 & 12, July 25 & 25 and August 8 & 9
Dixon University Center, Harrisburg PA, w/online component
Elaine Bergstresser, Adjunct Faculty, Educational Leadership and Special Education Department

Designed to provide future school administrators with the requisite skill sets and conceptual knowledge needed for effective 21st century leadership.  Understanding technology as a tool for learning, managing, analyzing, communicating, and collaborating is integral to successful school leadership at the classroom, building, and central office levels.  Topics explored include technology integration, digital citizenship, use of technology in systemic organization improvement, professional growth, digital culture, and visionary leadership.  In addition to developing personal philosophies regarding use of technology in teaching, learning, and leading, each student will develop a personal portfolio of resources.

ELP521 Legal and Ethical Issues that Impact on Student Learning

CRN - 41214 (Summer A)
May 16 - June 27, 2015: Face-to-face with an online component
Face-to-face Mtgs: May 16, 17, June 13 and 27, 2015: 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Sean Fields, Adjunct Faculty, Educational Leadership and Special Education Department

Focuses on the legal foundations for the establishment and operation of public schools in the United States and Pennsylvania in particular. Assists students in understanding key issues that impact on student learning from both an historical and current perspective. Students should be knowledgeable in all important aspects of school law from basic rights of individuals to the legal requirements for designing and maintaining appropriate school environments for learning. In addition to a review of landmark cases and current issues, students will also study laws and topics specific to building level leadership in Pennsylvania.


History


HIS502-61 Introduction to Archives - 3 Credits

CRN - 41135 (Summer A)
May 18 - June 26, 2015; Online Course w/1 mandatory meeting
Face-to-face Mtg: Thursday, June 18, 2015 from 6 - 9 p.m. (Required)
Online and Shippensburg University, Room TBD
Dr. Steven Burg, Professor and History/Philosophy Department Chair
Christy Fic, Instructor, Lehman Library

Explores the history of archives and the historical roots of modern archival practices, and the rise of the archival profession in the United States. Examines the principles and best practices in archival collection development, accessioning, appraisal, arrangement, description, and reference, including consideration of the special issues posed by electronic records and audiovisual materials. Surveys the basic principles and techniques for the preservation and conservation of archival records, including paper documents, photographs, and electronic media.  Students will investigate the different missions, audiences, and approaches used by government, church, business, labor, and educational archives.

HIS593-71 Selected Topics: Teaching World War II - 3 Credits

CRN - 41170 (Summer A)
June 22 - June 26, 2015; Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Shippensburg University, Shippen Hall 340
Dr. David Godshalk, Professor, History/Philosophy Department
Dr. Mark Spicka, Professor, History/Philosophy Department

This course is an interactive workshop on recent scholarly trends relating to the study of World War II and effective strategies for incorporating these fresh perspectives into meaningful classroom activities and research projects.  Through lectures, discussions, and hands-on activities, the course will provide educators opportunities to review recent scholarship and identify new classroom resources (such as films, historical documents, novels, websites, written primary sources, and oral histories).  Participants will become familiar with the major scholarly debates regarding World War II, its origins, its legacies, and its role in shaping the experiences of American soldiers and support staff overseas.  Working together, we will explore a wide variety of resources and pedagogical techniques that educators can incorporate into their existing lessons.  The course will include a field trip to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and a research trip to the Army Heritage and Education Center.  In addition to teachers, the class will also benefit those students planning to conduct research on topics relating to military history, European History, the Holocaust, and the social and cultural history of twentieth century America.


Mathematics


MAT594-11 Selected Topics: Perspectives on Middle Grades and High School Mathematics Curricula

CRN - 41177 (Summer A)
June 8 - July 3, 2015; Monday - Thursday, 1 - 3:30 p.m.
Shippensburg University, Dauphin Humanities Ctr 210
Dr. Thomas Evitts, Professor, Mathematics Department


Reading


RDG413-11 Teaching Reading to English Language Learners - 3 credits

CRN41087 (Summer A)
May 18 - June 26, 2015; Tuesday & Thurdays: 9 a.m. - noon
Shippensburg University, Shippen Hall 224
Dr. Christopher Keyes, Assistant Professor, Teacher Education Department

Designed to address teaching reading and writing to the English language learner in a non-ESL classroom; address the concerns of teachers who encounter students in their classrooms who are learning English; explore theories about first-and second-language acquisition; introduce classroom best practices in literacy as they relate to learners of English; and support teachers in developing an understanding of the basic principles of teaching and assessing English language learners with practical suggestions for assisting students in learning to cope in their new culture. Course is reserved for reading minors and master's of reading students. 

RDG490-11 Selected Topics: Inquiry Approaches to Literacy Learning

CRN - 41089 (Summer A)
May 18 - August 7, 2015; Mondays 6 - 9:15 p.m.
Shippensburg University, Shippen Hall 200
Dr. Christopher Keyes, Assistant Professor, Teacher Education Department

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses. 

RDG528-21 Foundations of Literacy Development - 3 credits

CRN - 42059 (Summer B)
June 27 - July 26, 2015; Monday - Friday, 2 - 4 p.m.
Shippensburg University, Shippen Hall 200
Dr. Lynn Baynum, Associate Professor, Teacher Education Department

Provides a comprehensive overview of factors related to literacy development and explores the implications of knowledge about the reading/writing process for effective instruction. Topics considered include such areas as: research knowledge about literacy processes, early literacy experiences, comprehension, vocabulary/concept development, word identification, literature for reading instruction, microcomputers and literacy, instructional materials, classroom organization for effective literacy instruction, and strategies for instruction/assessment in reading. 

RDG533-21 Advanced Diagnosis and Assessment in Reading - 3 credits

CRN42061 (Summer B)
June 15 - July 10, 2015; Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
Shippensburg University, Shippen Hall 230
Dr. Cheryl Slattery, Associate Professor, Teacher Education Department

Further examines issues introduced in RDG532 with emphasis upon refining and expanding expertise in observation of literacy development. Preparation of a clinical case report required. Other topics investigated include: current issues in literacy assessment, new strategies for assessment, organizing classrooms for optimal diagnosis and instruction, recent literature by reading researchers with implications for assessment. Prerequisite: RDG532.

RDG534-21 Laboratory Practicum in Reading - 3 credits

CRN 42062 (Summer B)
June 15 - July 10, 2015; Monday - Friday, 10 a.m. - noon
Shippensburg University, Shippen Hall 200
Dr. Cheryl Slattery, Associate Professor, Teacher Education Department

Provides experience in facilitating children's literacy development in a clinical setting with guidance and support from university faculty. Assessment/instructional strategies are practiced and discussed as a means of building insights about literacy processes and individual developmental needs. Prerequisite: RDG532. 

RDG537-65 Brain Based Strategies - 3 credits

CRN - 42128 (Summer B)
June 27 - July 26, 2015; This is an online course with one f2f mtg and synchronous online mtgs.
Face-to-Face Meeting: Monday, June 29 from 6 - 9 p.m. in SPH200
Synchronous Online Meetings: Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from 5:30 - 9 p.m.
Dr. Janet Bufalino, Associate Professor, Teacher Education Department

Focuses on differentiating reading and writing instruction within various settings, including supplemental and classroom, for meeting the needs of struggling learners. Includes techniques for using intervention team meetings to select appropriate services, collaborating with teachers across intervention programs, and using assessment to monitor learner's progress.


Organizational Development Leadership


SOC550-61 Leadership Theory and Practice - 3 Credits

CRN - 41152 (Summer A)
May 18 - June 26, 2015: This course is completely online.
Dr. Barbara Denison, Associate Professor and Department Chair
Sociology/Anthropology Department

Overview of theories of leadership historical and contemporary. Emphasis will be on application of theories in pragmatic situations to promote system goals. Understanding of variations in effective leadership models across diverse cultures and subcultures is discussed.


Teacher Education


EDU490-75 Using Museum Programs in the Classroom to Assist Meeting Pennsylvania's Academic Standards - 3 Credits

CRN - 42170 (Summer B) 
June 29 - July 10
Week 1: Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, 8 am - 4:30 pm
Week 2: Tuesday and Thursday, 8 am - 4:30 pm
Shippensburg University, Horton Hall 128
Katherine Wolford, Adjunct Faculty, Teacher Education Department

This course will allow teachers to understand the role museums and museum educators can play in adding value to subject content.  Participants will identify museum resources that will support classroom activities with or without an accompanying on-site visit.

TCH490-71 Selected Topics: Blended Learning in the 21st Century Classroom - 3 Credits

CRN - 41208 (Summer A)
June 22 - July 3, 2015
Week 1: Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Week 2: Tuesday and Thursday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Shippensburg University, Shippen Hall 240
Dr. Han Liu, Assistant Professor, Teacher Education Department

This course introduces best practices for blended learning in PK-12 classrooms. Students will use a series of hands-on activities, computer lab workshops, mobile learning demonstrations, and subject area related digital projects to learn how to design and implement effective blended learning strategies in 21st century classroom. Topics include developing lesson plans based on blended learning instructional models, identifying and evaluating OERs (Open Educational Resources) and free online instructional tools for classroom instruction and student self-directed learning, designing differentiation activities with integration of digital content and mobile devices, applying assistive technology tools and resources to address students’ special needs, creating digital media for instruction using free online tools, and using social media to engage learner and deliver instructions beyond school campus. Topics such as 21st century skills and digital citizenship education will also be discussed in this course.

TCH491-71 Selected Topics: Supportive Learning Environments in the Elementary School - 3 credits

CRN - 41209 (Summer A)
June 22 - July 3, 2015
Monday - Thursday, 8 a.m. - 12 Noon and Friday 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.      
Week 2: Tuesday and Thursday, 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
HACC Gettysburg /  Room: 108               
Dr. Rebecca Blahus, Assistant Professor, Teacher Education Department

The learning environment of a classroom can impact relationships, instruction, learning and engagement.  How can teachers meet common core and assessment requirements while still meeting the developmental needs of the learners?  Our choices and decisions as teachers should consider ways to create and maintain a learning environment that meets state requirements and addresses learner needs at the same time.  We will review differentiation, management, classroom design, student ownership/responsibilities and schedules as possible tools to create a supportive environment.

TCH511-65 Elementary School Curriculum and Assessment - 3 Credits

CRN - 42098 (Summer B)
June 29 - July 31, 2015:  This course is completely online.
Dr. Christine Royce, Professor and Department Chair, Teacher Education Department

Surveys existing elementary school programs and research to determine and evaluate curricular models and assessment issues. Investigates such areas as purposes of education, curricular content, scope and sequence, classroom climate, standards, and program evaluation. 

TCH546-65 Teaching Science in the Elementary School - 3 Credits

CRN - 42120 (Summer B)
July 6 - August 7, 2015:  This course is completely online.
Dr. Christine Royce, Professor and Department Chair, Teacher Education Department

Explores a variety of strategies and techniques for effective N-8 science teaching. An understanding of related science principles is interwoven with practical applications for the classroom. Science curriculum construction and analysis is an emphasis. Science, technological, and societal connections are considered.

TCH600-61 Elements of Research - 3 Credits

CRN - 41154 (Summer A)
May 18 - June 26, 2015: This course is completely online.
Dr. Christine Royce, Professor and Department Chair, Teacher Education Department

Includes a study of the nature and types of research, the selection of appropriate research topics, research techniques including simple statistics, the use of the library resources in research and the systematic collection, evaluation and presentation of research data. Students are guided in developing an action research project in the area of elementary education. 

TCH600-21 Elements of Research - 3 Credits

CRN - 42063 (Summer B)
May 18 - June 26, 2015: This course is completely online.
Dr. Andrea Malmont, Assistant Professor, Teacher Education Department

Includes a study of the nature and types of research, the selection of appropriate research topics, research techniques including simple statistics, the use of the library resources in research and the systematic collection, evaluation and presentation of research data. Students are guided in developing an action research project in the area of elementary education. 

TCH620-65 Curricular Decision Planning: Standards, Assessment & Accountability - 3 Credits

CRN - 42099 (Summer B)
June 29 - July 31, 2015: This course is completely online.
Dr. Christine Royce, Professor and Department Chair, Teacher Education Department

Curricular Decision Planning: Standards, Assessment & Accountability examines the different attributes, best practices, approaches and resources for curricular design, improvement, decision making, as well as utilization of data for classroom and school wide instruction and accountability. Pennsylvania’s Standards Aligned System (SAS), Common Core Standards, Alternative Academic Standards and other state and national guiding documents will be used as the basis for investigating how curricular planning, assessment, accountability and student learning performance are interconnected. In addition to foundational research in curriculum, students will also utilize the SAS portal to focus on integrating the components of Standards, Assessments, Curriculum Framework, Instruction, Materials and Resources, and Safe and Supportive Schools. This course meets the requirements for conversion to Level II Certification.


Additional Courses That May Be of Interest 


Please note that these courses are for undergraduate credit only and are completely online.  

DS100 (CRN41114) - Introduction to Disability Studies, May 18 - June 19
Introduction to Disability Studies provides students with the opportunity to examine disability as a social, cultural, and political phenomenon. We will explore the impact of disability as it relates to the individual, families, social institutions, cultures and societies, and we will analyze the lives and perspectives of people with disabilities. We use an intersectional approach to diversity, always situating disability within its historical and social context and in relationship to other potential identities rooted in race, gender, class, and sexuality. This is an interdisciplinary course.


ESC200 (CRN41118 or CRN42080) - Lifestyle Management, May 18 - June 19 (CRN41118) or June29 - July31 (CRN42080)
Designed to assist young adults in the understanding of and planning for a lifelong healthful lifestyle. Wellness topics discussed include the five components of health-related fitness, chronic disease prevention, stress management, nutrition, and weight management with an emphasis on lifetime fitness. Students will design and implement an individualized fitness and behavior modification program.


ESC207  (CRN42081) - Stress Management, June 29 - July 31
Explores stress reaction and its relationship to illness and disease. Provides intervention strategies to limit harmful effects in addition to other such skills necessary for successful life management.

ESC213 (CRN42082) - Organization and Administration for Fitness and Sport Facilities, June 29 - July 31
Explores organization and administrative procedures for health, fitness and sport settings. May include health and safety concerns, fitness facility maintenance and planning, fitness facility design and evaluation, financial management, legal liability issues, organizational design, security, and facility and event assessment. 

HCS381 (CRN42083) - Professional Communication and Multi-media Presentation, July 20 - August 21 
A performance based course designed to improve and enhance skills in speaking, writing, and utilizing multi-media channels for effective communication in modern professional settings. The core speaking component emphasizes structure, audience adaptation, style of presentation, and the integrated use of contemporary presentational techniques. Successful completion indicates students have demonstrated high levels of skill and a strong theoretical understanding of effective performance of public oral communication in the workplace.

PSY265 (CRN41148) - Childhood and Adolescence, May 18 - June 19
Provides understanding and appreciation of the interrelated growth processes of child development. Includes physical, interpersonal, social, peer, self-developmental, emotional, and cognitive processes.

PSY397 (CRN41163) - Human Cognitive Development, May 18 - June 19 
Presents a life span approach to study of human development with an emphasis on cognitive processes in infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Purpose is to familiarize the student with basic concepts, models, theories and research in the field of cognitive development. Models of gene-environment interaction, Piagetian, Neo-Piagetian, Information-Processing approaches and Post-formal approaches discussed, as well as their application to perception, memory, language, intelligence and wisdom development. Introduces practical applications of current theories of cognitive human development. Recommended to have prior courses in Developmental Psychology and/or Cognition.

SPN215 (CRN42096) - Intermediate Spanish For Heritage and Native Speakers, June 29 - July 31
Spanish 215 is a communicative course, which provides exercises and activities that will enable the heritage and native speakers to learn the foundations of Spanish as a language that they speak in their home and/or community, as their first language (while they have also an important level of fluency in English. We will study the Spanish grammar, linguistic structures, while reading and speaking in Spanish and practicing writing and differentiating between different levels of Spanish. We will also study different texts, movies and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. This course will be offered online. PREQUISITE: ONLY FOR NATIVE AND/OR HERITAGE SPEAKERS.

SWK262 (CRN42097) - Introduction to Child Welfare, July 6 - Aug 14 
This course has a mandatory face-to-face orientation on Wednesday, July 8 from 5 - 9 p.m. in Shippen Hall 370.  Provides knowledge and understanding of some of the primary problems in the field of child welfare. Improves students' ability to identify and assess various types of child maltreatment and neglect. Family relationships, social, cultural, legal, and other environmental influences are included in the assessment. Introduces the child welfare system and current best practices in child welfare treatment and intervention through interactive and experiential course work. Requires observation in a child-welfare related organization.