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Course Descriptions

Academic Success Program (ASP)

ASP101 Student Voices: Identity and Connection (3 crs.)

Provides an extended orientation to the academic expectations and demands of higher education. Student Voices lead a systematic exploration of values, beliefs, and skills that assists in becoming successful in academic endeavors. Students learn to connect to the larger campus community. Basic skill development in reading, writing, and critical thinking are stressed.

ASP102 Student Voices: Leadership and Community (3 crs.)

A systematic exploration of the values, beliefs, and skills that assist in becoming successful in the communities to which one belongs and to society in general. Topics include leadership theory, community identification, career development, and service learning. Self-assessment, diversity, and character development are addressed as subtopics.

Accounting (ACC)

ACC200 Fundamentals of Financial Accounting (3 crs.)

Introduces accounting concepts, principles, and practices followed in the preparation of external financial reports. Alternative accounting treatments and policies relative to asset valuation, liability measurement, and income determination are discussed. Emphasis on interpretation, uses, and limitations of financial reports.

ACC201 Managerial Accounting (3 crs.)

Introduces accounting concepts for planning, control, motivation, internal reporting, and evaluation. Topics included are product cost determination procedures, analysis of cost behavior, budgeting, costs for decision making and control, and responsibility accounting. Emphasis on the internal decision maker's use of information generated by the accounting system. Prerequisite: ACC200.

ACC203 Personal Income Tax Accounting (3 crs.)

Analyzes the federal income tax law and its application to individuals. Includes a series of applications concerning exclusions and inclusions from gross income, individual returns, and personal exemptions; basis, determination, and recognition of gain and loss; capital gain and loss of individuals; dividends and the various deductions of expenses, interest, taxes, contributions, medical expenses, depreciation, losses, and bad debts. Prerequisite: ACC200. This course is not open to accounting majors.

ACC306 Tax Accounting (3 crs.)

Introduces fundamentals of federal taxation as they apply to tax entities including individuals, corporations, and partnerships. Primary emphasis on taxation of individuals with some emphasis on business activities including property transactions. Other tax entities also discussed. Students introduced to tax research and tax planning. Prerequisites: ACC200 and ACC201 (C grade or better).

ACC310 Intermediate Accounting I (3 crs.)

First of three courses involving an intensive study of accounting concepts, theories, and practices relative to external financial reporting. Topics include: processing and reporting financial transactions and information relating to the content and structure of financial statements; concepts and procedures underlying revenue and expense recognition; application of time value of money concepts in an accounting framework; and valuation and accounting for current assets, long-term tangible assets, current liabilities, and long-term liabilities. Prerequisite: ACC200 & ACC201 (C grade or better).

ACC311 Intermediate Accounting II (3 crs.)

Second of three courses involving an intensive study of accounting concepts, theories and practices relative to external financial reporting. Topics include: processing and reporting financial transactions and information relating to the content and structure of financial statements; concepts and procedures underlying revenue and expense recognition; application of time value of money concepts in an accounting framework; and valuation and accounting for liabilities, stockholders' equity, investments, deferred income taxes, compensation, accounting changes, earnings per share, pension and leases. Prerequisite: ACC310 (C grade or better).

ACC312 Cost Determination and Analysis (3 crs.)

Introduces the principles and procedures of cost analysis and control; theories of cost allocation and accumulation; uses of accounting information for planning, control and performance evaluation. Continues development of skills for analyzing complex cost and managerial accounting problems using microcomputer spreadsheet models. Includes process costing, cost allocation, joint costs, transfer pricing, and divisional performance evaluation, statistical applications in cost analysis and capital budgeting. Emphasis throughout on processing of cost information as well as analysis, reporting, and evaluation of the cost data. Prerequisites: ACC200 and ACC201 (C grade or better) and SCM200.

ACC401 Advanced Accounting (3 crs.)

Third of three courses involving an intensive study of accounting concepts, theories, and practices relative to external financial reporting. Topics include consolidated financial statements, accounting in the international environment, and governmental accounting. Issues relating to full disclosure and the role of the Securities and Exchange Commission and professional accounting organizations in financial reporting are considered. Prerequisite: ACC311 (C grade or better).

ACC404 Auditing (3 crs.)

Introduction to standards and procedures employed by professional accountants in performing audits. The objectives of an audit and the types of examinations necessary for rendering opinions on financial reports and for other specified purposes are considered. Prerequisite: ACC311 (C grade or better).

ACC406 Advanced Tax Accounting (3 crs.)

More in-depth coverage of impact of federal income tax on business entities including proprietors, corporations and partnerships. Primary emphasis is taxation of corporations and flow-through tax entities. Includes expanded coverage of tax research and planning as well as ethical responsibilities in tax practice. Prerequisite: ACC306 (C grade or better).

ACC412 Advanced Cost Analysis and Control (3 crs.)

Considers a range of problems related to accumulation and use of accounting data for decision making by the management of the business enterprise. Analytical costing techniques are developed by integrating cost concepts and information generated by the accounting system with quantitative business methods. Emphasis on relationship of decision theory and the cost accounting function to the management information system. Explicit consideration given to behavioral foundations for planning and control. Prerequisite: ACC312 (C grade or better).

ACC418 Accounting Information and Control Systems (3 crs.)

Designed to provide an understanding of the accounting function as a subsystem within the total management information system. Consideration given to the source of data processed by the accounting system and the form in which it is stored in order to support the planning, control, reporting, and evaluation activities of management. Emphasis on relationship of the information needs of management to the classification of data and the design of the accounting system. Prerequisite: ACC312 (C grade or better).

ACC490 Selected Topics in Accounting (3 crs.)

Considers contemporary accounting issues affecting society and businesses (private, public and not-for-profit) in both the national and international spheres. Prerequisites: ACC311 (C grade or better) or departmental permission.

Anthropology (ANT)

ANT111 Cultural Anthropology (3 crs.)

Is a study of the nature of humanity. Cuts across the boundaries which separate the sciences from the humanities and embraces both. Deals with basic facts concerning humanity in all of its variations, leading to understanding and appreciation of the significant differences in the behavior of various ethnic groups.

ANT121 Physical Anthropology (3 crs.)

Considers human biology. Topics include genetic, developmental and physiological mechanisms by which human populations adjust to their environment. Included are the study of human origins as seen in the fossil record and the comparative biology of humans and their primate relatives.

ANT150 Introduction to Archaeology (3 crs.)

Introduces archaeological method and theory, while tracing our prehistoric heritage and the processes that led to the evolution of settled villages, agriculture, and eventually civilization. Topics range from early African human origins to the European Stone Age and from Mesopotamia and Egypt to Mexico and the United States.

ANT211 Comparative Cultures (3 crs.)

Is a course in ethnography that studies the wide range and variability of human culture, considers other ways of life, and the continuity of humanity and culture. A number of societies will be studied on the different levels of social organization and on a worldwide basis. Prerequisite: ANT111 or permission of the instructor.

ANT220 Anthropology for International Studies (3 crs.)

Uses anthropological content and techniques to increase the cross-cultural awareness and effectiveness of students interested in international business, journalism, civil service, or other careers involving cross-cultural contact.

ANT310 Magic, Science and Religion (3 crs.)

Provides a cross-cultural framework for the comparison and analysis of supernatural belief systems. Discussion of local nature-based religions as well as major world religions. Also includes a consideration of the relationship between religion and science.

ANT312 Comparative Marriage and Family (3 crs.)

Deals with various anthropological issues in the field of marriage and family studies, such as: family types, marriage and sex variation including the incest taboo, evolutionary ecology, illegitimacy, dowry deaths, infanticide, experiments in family living, gay and lesbian couples, high-tech fertilization and surrogate motherhood, and gender roles. Prerequisite: ANT111.

ANT320 Comparative Gender Roles (3 crs.)

Considers gender roles from a cross-cultural perspective and includes material from the United States as well as other cultures. Topics include socialization and gender stratification and the relationship of gender to major social institutions such as the family, religion, and politics. Prerequisite: ANT111.

ANT330 Mammoth Hunters and Moundbuilders (3 crs.)

Introduces varied archaeological cultures that inhabited this continent for at least the last 15,000 years, if not longer. Topics range from the early Paleo-Indian mammoth hunters to the whale-hunting cultures of the Pacific Northwest, the Pueblo cliff dwellers of the American Southwest, the mound builders of the Eastern Woodlands, and finally to the period of contact with European explorers. Course supplemented with slides, films, and artifacts. Prerequisites: ANT111 or ANT150.

ANT341 North American Indians (3 crs.)

Considers the many aspects of Native American cultures. Topics include the peopling of the New World, prehistoric Indians, Aztecs and Mayas, religion and rituals, Columbus and the "discovery" of America, the struggle for the West, cultures of various nations, and contemporary problems. Prerequisite: ANT111.

ANT350 Medical Anthropology (3 crs.)

Includes the cross-cultural consideration of concepts of health, illness, and curing. Differences and similarities between ethnomedicine and biomedicine are considered, as is the historical and current impact of European cultures on the health of indigenous people. Prerequisite: ANT111.

ANT351 Peoples and Cultures of Europe (3 crs.)

Investigates the cultural diversity of Europe from an anthropological perspective. Northern, central, and southern cultures will be surveyed and selected societies will be investigated with regard to culture history, subsistence, social structure, kinship and marriage, political process, rural-urban linkage, and ritual and religion. Prerequisite: ANT111.

ANT360 Aztec and Maya Archaeology (1-3 crs.)

Examines archaeological evidence recovered from some of the greatest Pre-Columbian civilizations in the Americas, such as the Olmec, Maya, and Aztec. Addresses factors that led to the rise and fall of the ancient civilizations in the region archaeologists call Mesoamerica. Course supplemented with slides, films, and artifacts. Prerequisite: ANT111 or ANT150.

ANT390 Internship I (3 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

ANT391 Internship II (3 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

ANT392 Internship III (3 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

ANT393 Selected Topics in Anthropology (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

ANT490 Selected Topics in Anthropology (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

Art (ART)

ART101 Art Appreciation (3 crs.)

Introduction to the visual arts emphasizing major historical artistic movements, the elements of art, and the media of art. Attention given to multicultural and gender contributions in the areas of fine arts, crafts, and the applied arts.

ART110 Basic Drawing (3 crs.)

Fundamental course including experiences in drawing from the still-life, the environment, and the human figure. Stresses visual perception, the development of eye-hand coordination, sensitivity to a variety of drawing materials, and an introduction to the basic principles of perspective. Descriptive and expressive approaches to drawing will be explored.

ART210 Drawing II (3 crs.)

Studio course to develop advanced value rendering skills and an increased awareness of the principles of light and shadow. Experimental and contemporary drawing approaches are introduced. A diverse range of media in black-and-white will be explored; color will be included. A portfolio, which represents an investigation of self-expression and experimentation, is an outcome and a requirement. Prerequisite: ART110. (Offered in spring only.)

ART211 Figure Drawing (3 crs.)

Directed at analyzing the human form and its structure. A variety of drawing media and drawing approaches are used to address anatomy, texture, space, and the principles of light and shadow. Exploration of the relationship between the figure and the environment and the development of figurative imagery, which is descriptive and expressive, will be included. Prerequisite: ART110. (Offered even years, fall only.)

ART215 Color and Two-Dimensional Design (3 crs.)

Laboratory course to provide analyses of the basic elements and principles of visual design. Various media including traditional and contemporary tools, such as the computer, will be explored. Assignments and presentation of a design portfolio is required of each student. (Offered in fall only.)

ART217 Computer Design I (Page Composition) (3 crs. )

Introductory course taught on the Macintosh computer. Basic elements of page layout design including composition, type and typesetting, graphic elements, cropping, text wrapping, photo image control, and the use of a scanning device will be covered along with information about the design industry: creating publications and working with printers and photographers. General usage of the Macintosh operating system will be taught. Emphasis on visual appearance and design of publications.

ART218 Three-Dimensional Design (3 crs.)

Introduction to working with elements and principles of three-dimensional design. Work with basic concepts of form, shape, mass, color, and texture using a variety of materials: paper, wood, metal, plaster, and clay. (Offered in spring only.)

ART231 Art History I (3 crs.)

Begins with the prehistoric period and Near Eastern art. Progresses through the Mediterranean cultures of Egypt, Minoan and the Cycladic Islands, Mycenaean, Greek, Etruscan and Roman art. Followed by early Christian, Byzantine and Islamic art. Concludes by examining early Medieval and Romanesque art. (Offered even years, fall only.)

ART232 Art History II (3 crs.)

Continues where Art History I concluded. Study of gothic art and introduction to art of India, China, Japan, and the native art of the Americas, Africa, and the South Pacific. The Proto-Renaissance in Italy, 15th and 16th century Italian art, the Renaissance outside of Italy, and Baroque art are studied. Rococo period of the 18th century is the final period discussed here. (Offered in fall only.)

ART233 Art History III (3 crs.)

Continues where Art History II concluded. Begins with Romanticism and Neoclassicism in Europe, follows the events leading to Impressionism and beyond in France. Cubism, the destruction of Renaissance space, and the anti-art activities of the Dada artists will lead into abstract expressionism, pop art, minimalism and conceptual art. All the major isms of the 20th century will be addressed. Global influences are reviewed and their impact on major artistic movements discussed. Concludes with contemporary postmodern art. (Offered in spring only.)

ART274 Introduction to Cultural Studio (3 crs.)

Introduces a variety of two- and three-dimensional media and techniques through visual art projects developed from the art history of diverse global cultures. Through studio projects, develops awareness for cultural influences in art, will learn a universal visual art vocabulary and develop personal skills in the handling of art materials. (Not open to art majors or art minors. Teacher education majors/art minors may enroll in this course.)

ART300 Independent Studio/Ceramics (3 crs.)

For advanced study in a particular art medium. Opportunity to pursue in-depth study using a single art form or combination of art forms that are of personal interest under the direction and guidance of a department faculty member. Student agrees to meet with a regularly scheduled studio art course through arrangement with the instructor. (Prior instructor approval required.) In case the student would schedule more than one independent studio, ART301, 302, 303, 304, 305, or 309 may be substituted.

ART302 Independent Studio/Enameling (3 crs.)

For advanced study in a particular art medium. Opportunity to pursue in-depth study using a single art form or combination of art forms that are of personal interest under the direction and guidance of a department faculty member. Student agrees to meet with a regularly scheduled studio art course through arrangement with the instructor. (Prior instructor approval required.) In case the student would schedule more than one independent studio, ART300, 301, 303, 304, 305, or 309 may be substituted.

ART303 Independent Studio/Painting (3 crs.)

For advanced study in a particular art medium. Opportunity to pursue in-depth study using a single art form or combination of art forms that are of personal interest under the direction and guidance of a department faculty member. Student agrees to meet with a regularly scheduled studio art course through arrangement with the instructor. (Prior instructor approval required.) In case the student would schedule more than one independent studio, ART300, 301, 302, 304, 305, or 309 may be substituted.

ART304 Independent Studio/Sculpture (3 crs.)

For advanced study in a particular art medium. Opportunity to pursue in-depth study using a single art form or combination of art forms that are of personal interest under the direction and guidance of a department faculty member. Student agrees to meet with a regularly scheduled studio art course through arrangement with the instructor. (Prior instructor approval required.) In case the student would schedule more than one independent studio, ART300, 301, 302, 303, 305, or 309 may be substituted.

ART305 Independent Studio /Computer Design (3 crs.)

For advanced study in a particular art medium. Opportunity to pursue in-depth study using a single art form or combination of art forms that are of personal interest under the direction and guidance of a department faculty member. Student agrees to meet with a regularly scheduled studio art course through arrangement with the instructor. (Prior instructor approval required.) In case the student would schedule more than one independent studio, ART300, 301, 302, 303, 304, or 309 may be substituted.

ART306 Computer Design II (Illustration) (3 crs.)

Second-level course taught on the Macintosh computer. Will learn the art of computer illustration, drawing and rendering techniques, including all aspects of a postscript language illustration program. Also taught in-depth will be type manipulation and how to incorporate an illustration. Use of a color scanning device and a color printer will be covered along with information about the illustration and design industry, the future of the computer, and advanced use of the Macintosh operating system. Emphasis creating visually strong illustrations and designs. Prerequisite: ART217. (Offered in spring only.)

ART309 Independent Studio (3 crs.)

For advanced study in a particular art medium. Student agrees to meet with a regularly scheduled studio art course through arrangement with the instructor. (Prior instructor approval required.) In case student would schedule more than one independent studio, ART300, 301, 302, 303, 304, or 305 may be substituted.

ART319 Computer Design III (Painting and Photo Manipulation) (3 crs.)

Third-level course taught on the Macintosh computer. Will learn the art of photo manipulation, editing, painting, compositing, and pre-press techniques including all aspects of using a bitmapped software program. Also covered choosing printers, preparing files for output, setting halftone screens, resolutions, traps, chokes, and creating color separations. Elements and principles of design, working between software programs, the use of a color scanning device, video and still camera capturing devices covered along with creating meaningful imagery. Emphasis on creating visually strong computer generated photographs, paintings, and designs. Prerequisites ART217.

ART321 Watercolor I (3 crs.)

Fundamental course in watercolor painting designed to introduce the varied materials, tools, and techniques of watercolor painting with special attention to its unique characteristics as a painting medium. Composition and development of personal imagery also discussed. (Prior experience in drawing and working with color is recommended.) (Offered in spring only.)

ART322 Watercolor II (3 crs.)

Intermediate level that stresses the exploration of watercolor painting media as a means of unique personal expression with increased emphasis on composition and structure. Prerequisite: ART321. (Offered in fall only.)

ART326 Painting I (3 crs.)

Fundamental course in painting designed to introduce the varied materials, tools and techniques of oil-based or acrylic-based painting media. Composition and development of personal imagery also discussed. (Prior experience in drawing and working with color is recommended.) (Offered in fall only.)

ART327 Painting II (3 crs.)

Intermediate level that stresses the exploration of oil/acrylic painting media as a means of unique personal expression with increased emphasis on composition and structure. Prerequisite: ART326. (Offered in spring only.)

Art 337 Printmaking I (3 crs.)

Introductory course in printmaking. Primarily a studio course, students will have an opportunity to make original prints using various traditional and contemporary printmaking processes. Also deals with history of printmaking and some important printmakers. Gives a better grasp of wide range of techniques and means of expression found in what can be a very complex art form.

Art 338 Printmaking II (3 crs.)

Second-level course in printmaking. Primarily a studio course, students have opportunity to make original prints using various traditional and contemporary printmaking processes that builds upon those learned in Printmaking I. Also deals with history of printmaking and some important printmakers. Gives a better grasp of wide range of techniques and means of expression found in what can be a very complex art form.

ART339 History of American Art (3 crs.)

Chronological study of American art—painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Colonial period to the 20th century. (Offered odd years, fall only.)

ART340 Ceramics (3 crs.)

Exploration of the potential of clay with emphasis on both hand building and wheel throwing techniques.

ART341 Advanced Ceramics (3 crs.)

Studio course that further develops knowledge of clay and the various working processes. Emphasis on mastery and refinement of skills—hand building and/or wheel throwing. Greater attention placed on mixing glazes and clay bodies and on firing techniques. Prerequisite: ART340. (Offered in spring only.)

ART356 Social Structures of Aesthetics, Philosophy and Criticism in the Arts (3 crs.)

Deals with general questions about art. Topics will be to handle abstract ideas, to discuss rationally, to distinguish between objective and subjective statements, to imagine possibilities, and to recognize necessary conditions within a definition. Criticism deals with responding to a specific work as well as a body of work. Two important functions considered are to interpret the meaning of the work and to demonstrate support judgments about the aesthetic merits of the work. Includes exposure to the arts through attendance at various performances, exhibitions, museums, and field trips. The aim is to explore the philosophical and historical aspects of the arts and how they are valued through art criticism. This knowledge will be applied to the environment of art education.

ART370 Sculpture (3 crs.)

Is an aesthetic analysis of three-dimensional form utilizing both traditional and contemporary materials and techniques. (Offered in fall only.)

ART385 Senior Art Seminar (3 crs.)

Requires student to examine the contemporary artists, art movements, and influences that directly impact their work and area of concentration. Emphasis on creating a portfolio of work with a specific focus conceived by the student. These works will be presented in a public exhibition. All stages of exhibition preparation will be addressed: scheduling, publicity materials, developing and creating an exhibition catalog, photographing and presenting works of art for exhibition, staging an exhibition, and the packaging/transporting works of art. Résumé preparation and developing a career portfolio will also be included. (Required of all art majors.)

ART393 Selected Topics in Art (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

ART395,396,397 Internship in Art I II, III (3 crs. each)

Offers a planned program of research, observation, study and work in approved art agencies and institutions for junior and senior art majors. Specific nature of the experience will follow the pattern dictated by the agency/institution. Only 6 crs. of internship credit can count toward the art major. (Prior approval of the Department of Art and the cooperating agency is required.)

ART399 Independent Study (3 crs.)

ART400 Contemporary Methods in Art Education (3 crs.)

Explores studio materials, art-making processes, and modes of thought from a culturally diverse perspective and current methods regarding studio art instruction in the fields of elementary and secondary education. Exploring their personal artwork, students introduced in role of art teacher as facilitator, guide, and mentor, plus the various instructional strategies and models currently employed for success in the field. Besides exploring a cross section of contemporary art-making processes, students will analyze how they create in order to allow others to understand that process. Students will gain competency in lesson planning, organization, classroom management and assessment. Student emerges with a clearer understanding of the relationship between ideas, process, critique, and the vital role of the studio teacher. Consists of classroom lecture/presentation and intense studio activity. Includes an early field experience, designing, and implementing a studio art project with elementary-age students at the campus laboratory school. All artworks, projects, and experiences will culminate in critique and evaluation.

ART425 Computer Design IV (3 crs.)

Fourth-level course taught on the Macintosh computer. Learning the art of animation and multimedia production including sound and video editing and compositing. Using page composition and illustration/painting/digital photography techniques learned in Computer Design I, II, and III, students learn to compile text, paintings, and photographs into a composite multimedia program. Using paint and ink effects, information will be enhanced, with sound and video added to it. Elements and principles of design, working between software programs, the use of a color scanning device, video and still camera capturing devices, and CD authoring will be covered. Content includes techniques directed at creating visually strong multimedia productions. Prerequisite: ART217.

ART430 Computer Design V (Web Design) (3 crs.)

Fifth-level course taught on the Macintosh computer. Learning the art of animation and multimedia production including sound and video editing and compositing for web design. Using page composition and illustration/painting/digital photography techniques learned in Computer Design I, II and III, students will learn how to compile text, paintings, and photographs into a composite web program. Using transparency and vector embedding techniques, information will be enhanced with added sound and video. Elements and principles of design, working between software programs, the use of a color scanning device, video and still camera capturing devices, and CD authoring will be covered. Content includes techniques directed at creating visually sound and effective web design.

ART435 Computer Design VI (Book and Portfolio Design) (3 crs.)

Sixth-level course taught on the Macintosh computer. Examines the book as a physical artifact, as the material embodiment of text and visual imaging. Topics include the transitions between hand production and mechanical production, methods of bookmaking, printers and publishers, letter forms and typography, paper, page formats and layouts, illustrations, bindings, and the purpose of the book with special emphasis on the relationships between meaning and physical form and the complex conventions of the book. The art of typographic design, calligraphy, book and portfolio design, papermaking, and bookmaking skills following both traditional and nontraditional techniques are covered. Using page composition and illustration/painting/digital photography techniques learned in Computer Design I, II, and III, students enlarge and enhance their knowledge of typography and how to use it in book design. They will use their computer illustration, painting and digital photographic skills to add visuals into the composite book. Elements and principles of design, working between software programs, the use of a color scanning device and digital camera capturing devices will be covered. Content includes techniques directed at creating visually and thematically strong and unique artist's portfolios and books. Prerequisite: Computer Design I.

ART490 Selected Topics in Art (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

Biology (BIO)

BIO100 Basic Biology (3 crs.)

Deals with the principles of biology. Topics include evolution and origins of life, cellular structure and physiology, growth and repair, reproduction and development, control, sources of food energy, inheritance, and human inter-relationship with the biological environment. Not open to biology majors. Three hours of lecture/week.

BIO115 Principles of Biology I (4 crs.)

Introductory course for majors that examines the diversity of life, plant form and function, animal form and function, and ecology. Three hours lecture and two hours lab/week.

BIO116 Principles of Biology II (4 crs.)

Introductory course for majors that examines cell structure and function, genetics, population genetics, and evolution. Three hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisite: One semester of college chemistry and Principles of Biology I are strongly recommended.

BIO142 Introduction to Ecology (3 crs.)

Explores basic ecological patterns and processes that affect populations, communities, and ecosystems. Laboratory/field sessions emphasize ecological principles and techniques. Recommended for students seeking certification in environmental education whose major is not biology and students majoring in geoenvironmental studies. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week.

BIO145 Problems of the Environment (3 crs.)

Students are made aware of the many problems created by expanding human populations and technological growth and proliferation. Ecological alternatives are suggested. Topics include the shaping of humans by the environment, our relationships with the biotic and abiotic world, water and air pollution, climate change, pesticides, herbicides, contaminants, food additives, the urban environment, and consequences of the expanding human population. Three hours lecture/week. Credit earned in this course is not applicable to the credits required of the biology major.

BIO150 Human Biology (3 crs.)

Introductory course for non-biology majors which involves a study of the structure and function of the human organism. Major diseases and contemporary factors that adversely affect human existence are considered. Three hours lecture/week. Credit earned in this course is not applicable to credits required of the biology major.

BIO201 Introduction to Biotechnology (1 cr.)

Comprehensive introduction to applications and methods of biotechnology. Topics include microbial, plant, animal, and marine biotechnology. Applications to medicine, forensics, and the environment will be examined. Required for Biotechnology concentration. One hour lecture/week. Pre- or co-requisites: Principles of Biology I and II, Genetics, Microbiology, Chemical Bonding and Chemical Dynamics.

BIO208 Field Biology (3 crs.)

Field/laboratory course designed for biology majors with secondary education certification with focus on identification and ecology of local plants and animals including the study of soil, hydrology, oceanography, and a survey of current assessment technologies like GIS. Two hours lecture and three hours lab/field/week. Prerequisite: Principles of Biology I. Requires one weekend field trip. (Offered fall semester and summers as needed.)

BIO210 Field Zoology (3 crs.)

Introduction to principles and techniques of field zoological investigation. Field and laboratory studies provide opportunity to learn appropriate procedures for the collection, preservation, and identification of selected groups of local animals. Both lecture and laboratory present the theory and methodology of zoological systematics. Two hours lecture and three hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I. Requires one weekend field trip. (Offered spring semester.)

BIO220 Microbiology (3 crs.)

Deals with the structural characteristics, physiology, and genetics of bacteria as well as principles of immunology and host-parasite relationships. Viruses and fungi are also considered. Laboratory exercises provide experience in the aseptic technique, staining, and evaluating the responses of microorganisms to various environmental changes. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II.

BIO242 Ecology (3 crs.)

Examines the interactions between organisms and their environment and the relationship between ecological processes and patterns of distribution and abundance of organisms. Laboratory/field sessions emphasize ecological principles and techniques. Two hours lecture and three hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and sophomore standing or permission of instructor.

BIO260 Genetics (3 crs.)

Introductory course dealing with the principles of heredity and the nature of the gene. Laboratory work includes genetic analysis in Drosophila and other organisms. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisite: Principles of Biology I and II.

BIO300, 301, 302 Biology Seminar (1 cr. each)

Discusses selected fields of biological research in depth. Major responsibility of the student will be to prepare by means of library research for the seminar discussions. One hour per/week. Restricted to junior and senior biology majors, prerequisites possible.

BIO310 Mammalogy (3 crs.)

Surveys various areas of mammalian biology including mammalian characteristics, evolution, classification, zoogeography, adaptive radiation, reproduction, population dynamics, behavior, physiology, ecology, and economic importance. Laboratory material covers trapping, study of skin preparation, identification of North American mammals, examination of skeletal and external adaptations, plus field and laboratory techniques. Includes a weekend field trip. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II.

BIO311 Ornithology (3 crs.)

Field course designed for a keener appreciation of the birds of Pennsylvania and the eastern United States. Focus is on identifying birds by sight and sound. The taxonomic, habitat, and community relationships of birds are emphasized. Instruction principally field trips during class periods on Saturday mornings. A multi-day field trip during spring vacation is an integral part of the course. Comfortable outdoor clothing, a pair of binoculars, and sturdy waterproof shoes/boots are required. Three hours field/museum instruction/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II or permission of instructor.

BIO317 Parasitology (3 crs.)

Phenomenon of parasitism as it is practiced by a variety of organisms. Broad coverage will include the phylogeny, morphology, classification, and life cycles primarily of parasites of medical and veterinary importance; host-parasite relationships; and ecology epidemiology of parasitic diseases. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II and Microbiology.

BIO324 Pathogenic Microbiology (3 crs.)

Considers the role of bacteria and fungi in the diseases of man with emphasis upon the differentiation and culture of microorganisms, types of diseases, immunology, modes of disease transmission, prophylactic, therapeutic and epidemiological aspects. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II and Microbiology. (Offered spring semester.)

BIO325 Medical Botany (3 crs.)

Deals with the nature of selected physiologically active secondary plant metabolites and their development for use as medicines. Their mode of action will be covered, along with information on their discovery and history of their medical use. Compounds with activity in the central and peripheral nervous systems and those with pulmonary, renal, and cardiovascular effects will be included. Anti-neoplastic agents, teratogens, and plant toxins will also be studied. Introductory material on plant structure, function, and classification will be included along with the basic principles of pharmacology. Three hours lecture/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II and Human Physiology or Animal Physiology.

BIO330 Animal Behavior (3 crs.)

Basic course emphasizing such topics as territoriality, social hierarchy, and communication. The laboratory is a most important part of this course with the opportunity to structure experiments, evaluate results, and report conclusions. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisite: Principles of Biology I and II. (Offered fall semester, even years.)

BIO350 Human Physiology (4 crs.)

Study of the function of the human organ systems and their role in maintaining homeostasis. Three hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II. (Recommended for pre-health professions and secondary education students. Students may not count both BIO350 and BIO351 towards major requirements.) (Offered spring semester.)

BIO351 Animal Physiology (3 crs.)

Study of the function of organ systems of animals. Related anatomy is taught as needed. Two hours lecture and three hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II and junior standing as Biology major or permission of instructor. (Students may not count both BIO350 and BIO351 towards major requirements.) (Offered fall semester.)

BIO352 Plant Form and Function (3 crs.)

Examines the role, physiology, anatomy and morphology of vascular plants. Topics include transport, development, and metabolism in relation to roots, stems, leaves and reproductive structures. Experimental and observational approaches are utilized. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I & II.

BIO370 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (3 crs.)

Introductory course in the structure of vertebrate animals. Laboratory work includes the comparative anatomical study of organ systems using representatives of the various protochordate and chordate classes. Emphasis on the physical evolution of the vertebrate classes using anatomical, embryological, and paleontological evidence. Two hours lecture and three hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II. (Offered spring semester.)

BIO371 Human Anatomy (4 crs.)

Involves a comprehensive, detailed study of the development, growth and functional anatomy of the human body. Enrollment priority is given to students in pre-health professional programs that require human anatomy. Three hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II.

BIO373 Vertebrate Embryology (3 crs.)

Introductory course in vertebrate embryology. Emphasis on the structural and functional aspects of comparative vertebrate reproduction and ontogeny. Laboratory work consists of the study of gametogenesis, early Amphioxus and frog development, and a selected series of chick and pig developmental stages. One hour lecture and four hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II.

BIO374 Hematology (2 crs.)

Designed to give a basic understanding of the formation, structure, and function of the blood elements. Both normal and abnormal cells are studied as well as the more common blood diseases. Laboratory periods are interspersed with lecture. Two hours lecture/lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II and Microbiology or permission of instructor. (Offered spring semester, even years.)

BIO375 Histology (3 crs.)

Involves the microscopic examination of vertebrate tissues from morphological and physiological perspectives. Reference made to organ embryogenesis to support understanding of organ form and function. Laboratory work involves extensive examination of microscope slides. Tissue preparation for histological examination is demonstrated. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II. (Offered spring semester.)

BIO385 Cell Biology (3 crs.)

Examines the structure and function of the cell. Topics include the molecular constituents of cells, information transfer, and the control of cell division. The structure, function, and biogenesis of the plasma membrane, internal membranes, nucleus, cytoskeleton, mitochondria, and chloroplasts will be addressed. Laboratory work is examination of cell structure and function by molecular and microscopic techniques. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II, Microbiology, Genetics and Modern Organic Chemistry I or permission of the instructor.

BIO391 Biology Internship I (1-3 crs.)

Provides opportunity to gain practical experience in chosen career area. [Please note that only 3 credits of internship may count as biology credits. Credits in excess of that number count as free electives in the General Education requirement.]

BIO392 Biology Internship II (1-3 crs.)

Provides opportunity to gain practical experience in chosen career area. [Please note that only 3 credits of internship may count as biology credits. Credits in excess of that number count as free electives in the General Education requirement.]

BIO393 Selected Topics in Biology (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

BIO396 Research III (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to do research under the guidance of selected faculty members. Students should register for this course only if they have credit for BIO398. Students should obtain approval of the research topic from the selected advisor before registering for course. Please note that only 3 credits of research may count as Biology credits. Credits in excess of that number count as free electives in the General Education requirement.

BIO397 Introduction to Research (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to do research under the guidance of selected faculty members. Students should obtain approval of the research topic from the selected advisor before registering for this course. Available as a pass/fail grade only. [Please note that only 3 credits of research may count as biology credits. Credits in excess of that number count as free electives in the General Education requirement.]

BIO398 Research II (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to do research under the guidance of selected faculty members. Students should register for this course only if they have credit for BIO397. Students should obtain approval of the research topic from the selected advisor before registering for this course. [Please note that only 3 credits of research may count as biology credits. Credits in excess of that number count as free electives in the General Education requirement.]

BIO408 Principles of Virology (3 crs.)

Covers morphology, replication cycles, and genetics of important bacterial, plant, and animal viruses as well as the use of viruses in biotechnology and gene therapy. Special emphasis given to viral pathogens of humans including the pathophysiology, transmission, treatment, and prevention of viral diseases. Newly emerging viral diseases and their impact on society will also be discussed. Graduate students expected to submit a 5-10 page term paper on a virology-related topic approved by the instructor. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology II and Genetics. Cell Biology. Pre- or co-requisites, or permission of instructor.

BIO409 Immunology (3 crs.)

Introduction to immunology, including immunity, serology, immunochemistry, and immunobiology. Other topics include immunodeficiency diseases, tumor immunology, transplantation immunology, autoimmune diseases, and allergies. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology II and Genetics. Cell Biology pre or co-requisite or permission of instructor.

BIO413 Marine Ichthyology (3 crs.)

Study of the internal and external structure of fishes, their systematic and ecological relationships, and their distribution in time and space. Taught only at WIMSC during summers.

BIO417 Herpetology (3 crs.)

Study of amphibians and reptiles including classification, evolution, functional morphology, ecology, and husbandry. Laboratory work includes anatomical study, identification, and field trips. Two periods lecture and one period lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology and Zoology or permission of instructor.

BIO418 Molecular Biology (3 crs.)

Examines structure and expression of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genes. Topics include experimental techniques used to clone, express, and analyze DNA sequences; chromosome and gene structure; mechanisms of DNA replication and repair; mechanisms of transcription and translation; the regulation of transcription; RNA processing and post-transcriptional regulation; gene regulation in development; and molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and cancer. Includes discussion of current literature and use of on-line resources for analysis of DNA sequences. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II, Microbiology, Genetics, Cell Biology or Biochemistry, or permission of instructor.

BIO423 Plant Pathology (3 crs.)

Basic course in plant pathology considers the major general groups of plant diseases together with specific representative diseases for each group and methods for their control. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology and Botany.

 

BIO425 Biota of Florida (2 crs.)

Seminar/field course deals with the biology of warm temperate and subtropical Florida including vegetation, fauna, geology, history, and economy. Offered spring semester of even-numbered years, it requires a single weekly class meeting plus an intensive 10-day field trip to parks, natural areas, and refuges in Florida over spring break. Field trip costs for the student include food, transportation, entrance and camping fees. Prerequisite: Biology major with junior standing or permission of instructors.

BIO430 Principles of Evolution (3 crs.)

Introduction to evolutionary principles, their applications, and the appropriate literature. Major topics include the history of evolutionary concepts, the species and speciation processes, phylogenetic patterns and their reconstruction, classification, biogeography, extinction, and biological nomenclature. Three hours lecture/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II and Genetics or permission of instructor.


BIO442 Aquatic Ecology (3 crs.)

Introductory course in fresh water ecology. Field work consists of the study of selected aquatic environments and includes methods of collecting data, identification of aquatic organisms and the interpretation of factors which influence their distribution. A paper based upon field work is required. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology, Zoology, and Botany or graduate status.

BIO444 Conservation Biology (3 crs.)

Applies the principles of population ecology, population genetics, biogeography, animal behavior, and paleobiology to the maintenance of global diversity and natural systems. Research theory is applied to conservation policy and management decisions. Two periods lecture and two periods lab/discussion per week. Includes midweek and weekend field trips. Prerequisites: college course in ecology or wildlife biology, or either senior or graduate status in the biology department.

BIO446 Ecology of Marine Plankton (3 crs.)

Deals with the phytoplankton of near shore and pelagic waters. The importance of phytoplankton in energy flow is emphasized. Taught only at WIMSC during summers.

BIO448 Field Botany and Plant Taxonomy (3 crs.)

Deals with principles of classification and systematics of vascular plants, with emphasis on local plant communities. Field trips and laboratories develop skill in the use of technical and popular identification manuals. Library readings develop familiarity with principles and literature of plant systematics and ecology. Memorization of selected, local species required. Field trips include several local excursions plus a weekend trip to natural areas in Pennsylvania and the Delmarva Peninsula. Prerequisite: Principles of Biology or Basic Biology or permission of instructor.

BIO450 Endocrinology (3 crs.)

Study of the glands of internal secretion and their biochemical and physiological role in development, growth, metabolism, homeostasis, and reproduction of animals. Prerequisite: Human Physiology or permission of instructor.

BIO455 Algae and Aquatic Plants (3 crs.)

Explores the structure, function, diversity, and economic importance of algae plus the aquatic groups of fungi, bryophytes, and vascular plants. Laboratories emphasize use of technical keys and include collecting techniques plus a Saturday field trip in early September. Prerequisite: Principles of Biology or permission of instructor.

BIO461 Techniques in Biotechnology (3 crs.)

Provides hands-on experience with standard molecular biology and immunological techniques commonly used in industrial and academic laboratories. Methods include immunoblotting methods, ELISA, isolation and analysis of DNA and RNA, protein purification, and gene cloning techniques. One hour lecture and four hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology II and Genetics. Cell Biology pre or co-requisite or permission of instructor.

BIO462 Invertebrate Zoology (3 crs.)

Synopsis of the phylogeny, classification and important adaptive features of major and minor invertebrate phyla. Emphasis on taxonomy and a comparative study of the morphology, composition, and functioning of the animal organ systems or their operational equivalent, as they occur in a broad representation of invertebrate groups, to include patterns of development, reproductive strategies, and life history adaptations. Graduate students required to complete additional course requirements. Prerequisites: Upper division standing, graduate status, or permission of instructor.

BIO463 Vertebrate Zoology (3 crs.)

Explores the diversity, function, and phylogenetic relationships among the vertebrate animals. Graduate students are required to submit a research paper on a topic approved by the instructor in addition to other course requirements. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II, or graduate standing, or permission of instructor.

BIO478 Microtechniques (3 crs.)

Consideration of the methods of preparation for microscopic study of plant and animal tissues. Includes some aspects of histological, cytochemical/histochemical, and immunocytochemical studies. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II and eight hours of chemistry. (Offered spring semester, odd years.)

BIO485 Biological Microscopy and Imaging (3 crs.)

Covers principles and techniques in macrophotography, light microscopy, especially micro- photography and videography, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Includes specimen handling and preparation including basic theory and practice in fixation, dehydration, dark room techniques, and computer imaging. Perform basic maintenance and alignment of the SEM. Research project required. Graduate students required to complete additional course requirements. Prerequisites: Upper division or graduate standing or permission of instructor.

BIO491 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by regular courses.

BIO494 Field Research Techniques (3 crs.)

Overview of methods for investigating biological field problems. Students will learn to use a variety of techniques in field conditions. Collection, analyses, and interpretation of data will be emphasized. Methods applied in current professional literature will be discussed. Graduate students will be required to complete an independent project culminating in a written report. Prerequisites: Graduate or upper division standing or permission of instructor.

BIO513 Cytogenetics (3 crs.)

Concerned with those aspects of genetics which can be studied by microscopy including chromosome structure, mitosis, meiosis, chromosome number, sex determination, and speciation. Aspects of human cytogenetics including abnormalities in chromosome number and structure is considered. Molecular biology of chromosome structure and function is emphasized. Prerequisite: 3 hours of genetics.

BIO514 Aquatic Entomology (3 crs.)

Rigorous course concentrating on the taxonomy and morphology of the insects having representatives spending all or part of their life cycles in aquatic environments. Intensive field and laboratory work centers on collection, classification of representative types and studies of ecological roles of various aquatic habitats. Prerequisite: Entomology, graduate status, or permission of instructor.

BIO515 How to Research, Write, and Publish a Scientific Paper (1 cr.)

Introduces biology graduate students to techniques and skills required to successfully research, write, and publish scientific papers. Topics include: What is research?; Why publish?; experimental design; literature searches; preparing a manuscript; preparing tables and figures; what, how, and where to submit; the editorial review process; and oral and poster presentation of research papers.

BIO516-519 Graduate Seminar (1 cr.)

Provides biology graduate students with an in-depth survey of current research in one of four core areas in the graduate curriculum: ecology, physiology, genetics/cell biology, and structure/morphology/taxonomy. Emphasis is on student-led discussions of papers assigned and read. Prerequisites: Biology graduate students must take two seminars in two different core areas or one core area plus BIO515.

BIO520 Plant Ecology (3 crs.)

Explores structure and function of natural plant communities and exposes students to methods of field sampling and data analysis in community ecology. Will include field labs to local forest and wetland plant communities. Prerequisite: Ecology.

BIO535 Problems in Plant Physiology (3 crs.)

Laboratory experience in selected plant physiology topics such as photosynthesis, translocation of the photosynthate, metabolic conversions, respiration, nitrogen metabolism, mineral nutrition and water relations. Prerequisite: 8 hours of chemistry or permission of instructor.

BIO540 Biogeography (3 crs.)

Examines factors influencing distribution of animals and plants in the biosphere through lecture/discussion. Prerequisite: Graduate status.

BIO541 Ecosystems (3 crs.)

Explores pattern and process in ecosystem, emphasizing elemental cycling and energy flow in and across terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and interfaces with biotic communities. Will include methods and approaches in ecosystem ecology and review of primary literature. Prerequisite: Ecology.

BIO547 Wetland Ecology (3 crs.)

Wetlands and the resident wildlife are studied as a unit to better understand the fragility of this invaluable habitat. Classification, delineations, wetlands protection techniques, current status of wetlands, specifically coastal wetlands will be the focus.

BIO555 Comparative Environmental Physiology (3 crs.)

Considers comparative aspects of life functions in selected representatives of the animal kingdom with respect to their different environments. Prerequisite: Animal Physiology or Human Physiology or permission of instructor.

BIO558 Microbial Ecology (3 crs.)

Examines the interactions of bacteria, yeasts and protozoans in the environment. The role of each type of microorganism in degradation and nutrient recycling is explored in the laboratory and in the field. Topics include soil, water, and gut microbiology; microorganisms as geochemical agents; microbial succession; and seasonal variation in microbial populations. Prerequisite: Microbiology.

BIO559 Evolutionary Ecology (3 crs.)

Lectures and discussion periods cover topics of physiological ecology, interspecific interactions, population ecology, community structure, the ecological niche, coevolution, and biogeography. Prerequisite: A previous college ecology course or permission of instructor.

BIO577 Ecomorphology (3 crs.)

Intended for students interested in a holistic approach to biology and experimental research. Reviews the morphological adaptations of animals with emphasis on vertebrates. The functional and behavioral aspects of these adaptations are discussed in the context of the evolutionary and ecological relationships of key taxa. Students are expected to apply their academic background to research, deliver, and discuss the morphological traits enhancing animal's biological fitness. Ramifications of Ecological Morphology (i.e., molecular biology, genetics, physiology, systematics, philosophy) could be also considered. Course is a combination of lectures, student presentations, and discussions of current scientific literature. Prerequisite: BIO462 Vertebrate Zoology or Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy or permission of instructor.

BIO581 Topics in Mammalian Biology (3 crs.)

Lectures and discussion examine topics of contemporary interest in mammalogy, including ecology, population dynamics, systematics, physiology, behavior, and zoogeography. Emphasis is on ecological studies of temperate forest small mammals. May involve some field work. Prerequisite: A course in mammalogy or graduate status.

BIO583 Biological Techniques (3 crs.)

Laboratory and field-oriented course. Students become skilled in a variety of techniques, selecting with advisement those activities most related to their interests and goals.

BIO593 Biometry (3 crs.)

Examines the uses of parametric and non-parametric statistics in biological research. Students gain practical experience in the application of statistical analyses to sets of original data using both hand calculation and packaged computer programs with emphasis on the organization and preparation of data for analysis, the selection of appropriate statistical tests, and the interpretation of the results of analyses of both published and unpublished data. A pocket calculator with square root function is recommended. Prerequisite: At least 14 credit hours of college biology.

BIO594 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

Department opportunity to offer courses in areas of major interest not covered by regular courses.

BIO599 Independent Study (3 crs.)

Opportunity to pursue special studies in biology or biology education on topics not available in other courses.

BIO600 Biological Research Methods (3 crs.)

A general study of research methodology in biology with a specific research design and project. Topics in the general study may include use of library resources, collection of data, framing and testing hypotheses and other techniques for evaluating evidence. The specific project consists of the development of a research design for the study of a specific problem in biology.

BIO605-608 Graduate Research (3-12 crs.)

Opportunity to engage in research under the guidance of a member of the biology faculty.

BIO609 Internship (3 crs.)

Opportunity for students to gain practical experience in their chosen career area.

BIO612 Thesis I (3 crs.)

Provides master's degree candidates with the opportunity to conduct a major research project. A research proposal and literature review are required. First in a two-course sequence. A temporary grade of Q will be assigned until the thesis is completed.

BIO613 Thesis II (3 crs.)

Second in a two course sequence of graduate courses designed to provide master's degree candidates an opportunity to conduct a major research project. Students implement the research designed in Thesis I, collect data, write a thesis, and make an oral presentation. Prerequisite: BIO612.

Biology (WIMSC)

The following courses are offered at the Marine Science Consortium at Wallops Island, Virginia, during the summer.

BIO205 Marine Biology (3 crs.)

Introduction to the marine environment. Includes the physical characteristics of marine ecosystems and the adaptations of organisms that live there. Only at WIMSC during summers. Two periods lecture and two periods lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I.

BIO245 Marine Ecology (3 crs.)

Deals with interactions of plants and animals in the unstable coastal environment. The barrier islands of the U.S. East Coast are emphasized. Only at WIMSC during summers. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I.

BIO315 Marine Invertebrates (3 crs.)

Survey of invertebrate phyla indigenous to coastal waters. Structural and functional adaptations discussed. Only at WIMSC during summers. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I.

BIO331 Behavior of Marine Organisms (3 crs.)

Examines intra- and interspecific behavior with emphasis on adaptive significance that accrues to marine species. Topics include conflict, reproduction, and communication. Only at WIMSC during summers. Prerequisite: 9 hours of biology or psychology.

BIO413 Marine Ichthyology (3 crs.)

Study of the internal and external structure of fishes, their systematic and ecological relationships, and their distribution in time and space. Only at WIMSC during summers. Prerequisite: 16 credits of biology or graduate status.

BIO446 Ecology of Marine Plankton (3 crs.)

Deals with the phytoplankton of near-shore and pelagic waters. Importance of phytoplankton in energy flow emphasized. Only at WIMSC during summers. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and an ecology course.

Business (BSN)

BSN101 Foundations of Business Administration (2 cr.)

Foundation course for all majors in the College of Business. Establishes platform for understanding of functional areas in business and how they work in concert for the benefit of the organization. Students will gain meaningful information and tools so that they may make informed choices with respect to their educational experiences and pursuit of a career in business. This course is restricted to declared business majors.

BSN408 Internship in Business Administration I (1 cr.)

Planned program requiring 120 hours or more on a job in business or government. Designed to supplement classroom study in the student's major. Work content must be approved by the department chair and internship director and supervised by a faculty member. Prerequisite: 55 credits, 2.0 or greater QPA in business, major and overall.

BSN409 Internship in Business Administration I (2 crs.)

Planned program requiring 240 hours or more on a job in business or government. Designed to supplement classroom study in the student's major. Work content must be approved by the department chair and internship director and supervised by a faculty member. Prerequisite: 55 credits, 2.0 or greater QPA in business, major and overall.

BSN410 Internship in Business Administration I (3 crs.)

Planned program requiring 360 hours or more on a job in business or government. Designed to supplement classroom study in the student's major. Work content must be approved by the department chair and internship director and supervised by a faculty member. Prerequisite: 55 credits, 2.0 or greater QPA in business, major and overall.

BSN411 Internship in Business Administration II (3 crs.)

Planned program requiring 360 hours or more on a job in business or government. Designed to supplement classroom study in the student's major. Work content must be approved by the department chair and internship director and supervised by a faculty member. Prerequisite: BSN410 but, if with same employer, at least 25 percent must be new duties or involve increased responsibility.

BSN412 Internship in Business Administration II (2 crs.)

Planned program requiring 240 hours or more on a job in business or government. Designed to supplement classroom study in the student's major. Work content must be approved by the department chair and internship director and supervised by a faculty member. Prerequisite: BSN 409 but, if with same employer, at least 25 percent must be new duties or involve increased responsibility.

BSN413 Internship in Business Administration II (1 cr.)

Planned program requiring 120 hours or more on a job in business or government. Designed to supplement classroom study in the student's major. Work content must be approved by the department chair and internship director and supervised by a faculty member. Prerequisite: BSN408 but, if with same employer, at least 25 percent must be new duties or involve increased responsibility.

BSN420 Internship in Business Administration I (6 crs.)

Planned program requiring 480 hours or more on a job in business or government. Designed to supplement classroom study in the student's major. Work content must be approved by the department chair and internship director and supervised by a faculty member. Students are required to submit learning goals; submit a paper related to their job, major, and career field assigned by their supervising faculty; complete a book report on assigned internship text; and participate in a mid-semester group internship discussion. This is a graded internship.

BSN420 Internship in Business Administration II (9 crs.)

Planned program requiring 600 hours or more on a job in business or government. Designed to supplement classroom study in the student's major. Work content must be approved by the department chair and internship director and supervised by a faculty member. Students are required to submit learning goals; submit a paper related to their job, major, and career field assigned by their supervising faculty; complete a book report on the assigned internship text; and participate in a mid-semester group internship discussion. Also required to give a presentation or conduct interviews with alumni in their chosen major, on their internship. This is a graded internship.

Business Administration (MBA)

MBA501 Economic and Information Systems Environment (4 crs.)

Introduction to macroeconomic and microeconomic principles with an emphasis to applications to modern business problems. Major topics include supply and demand, consumer behavior, theory of the firm, market structure and competition, monetary and fiscal policy, and international trade. The role of information technology in business environment is also discussed, including such topics as doing business on the Internet, database management, client-server networks, and information security. This course is part of the graduate business certificate and does not count toward the MBA degree.

MBA502 Managerial Accounting (3 crs.)

Develops an understanding of the quantitative use of accounting data for decision making within the firm. The focus is on developing an understanding of and appropriate use of cost in managerial decision making. Although the appropriate use of cost in this course refers primarily to short-term decisions, the strategic implications of cost analysis are also addressed.

MBA503 Business Operations and Analysis (4 crs.)

Explores the responsibilities and processes needed for a business to provide a product or service to customers. Case studies and real-world examples are used extensively to investigate the problems encountered in these business operations. Quantitative and non-quantitative methods and models are used in the analysis of topical subject areas such as forecasting, capacity planning, materials management, scheduling, and quality control. This course is part of the graduate business certificate and does not count toward the MBA degree.

MBA504 Essentials of Accounting and Finance (4 crs.)

Introduces the basics of financial accounting and financial management. The accounting concepts, practices, and principles that guide the preparation of the balance sheet, income statement, and the statement of cash flows are all presented. Financial management concepts and techniques are used to evaluate the financial performance of the firm. Topics include financial statement analysis, working capital management, and capital budgeting. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation and limitations of financial reports and their use in evaluating the performance of the firm. This course is part of the graduate business certificate and does not count toward the MBA degree.

MBA505 Organizational Behavior and Marketing (4 crs.)

The organizational behavior component examines human behavior in organizations and considers the practical skills managers need to motivate peers and subordinates, make decisions, deal with conflict, and succeed in a team-based environment. The marketing component examines marketing planning, marketing research, buyer behavior, market segmentation and targeting, as well as the key elements of a marketing strategy. This course is part of the graduate business certificate and does not count toward the MBA degree.

MBA508 Strategic Management and Leadership (4 crs.)

Explores strategic vision and direction. The importance of achieving a fit between the internal and external environment for organizational survival and success is a central issue. The strategic concepts of competitive advantage, strategy formulation and implementation, power and influence, organizational change, and leadership will be addressed. Case studies, business articles and text material will be used to examine strategy and leadership theory, heuristics, and practice. This course is part of the graduate business certificate and does not count toward the MBA degree.

MBA529 Global Managerial Finance (3 crs.)

Explores basic financial theories, their application, and financial decision models necessary for handling complex corporate financial problems in the global environment. Emphasizes the important role of finance in the global business operations.

MBA552 Entrepreneurship (3 crs.)

Examines all aspects of starting a new business, with emphasis on the critical role of recognizing and assessing opportunities. Topics include attributes of entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial careers, creating and evaluating opportunities, writing business plans, and financing new ventures.

MBA554 International Business (3 crs.)

Presents broad view of issues facing professionals in the international business area. Topics are broad and include international trade, exchange rates, finance, organizational structure, and international legal dimensions. Student learns to weave the social, technical, cultural, risk and human relations factors into a global context.

MBA556 Organizational Leadership (3 crs.)

Examines the leadership and influence issues managers face. Attention is given to leading up, down, and across the organization, recognizing leadership is not limited to managers. Through guest business speakers, cases, readings, projects, and simulations, students gain greater insight and skill in leading. Topics include characteristics of effective leaders, power and influence strategies, crisis management, organizational politics, and leadership assessment.

MBA 565 Information Management and Analysis for Decision Making (3 crs.)

Provides skills and tools necessary for managers to efficiently solve problems using information technology to support the decision making process. Using a variety of software packages, structured, semi-structured and unstructured problems will be analyzed and the role of information technology investigated. Models based on quantitative and non-quantitative data will be studied also.

MBA577 Supply Chain Management (3 crs.)

Introduces an integrated enterprise approach of flow of goods and services from suppliers to customers (supplier relationship, procurement, operations management, inventory control, logistics and transportation, distribution and customer service). Every topic in each area is being discussed in the context of integrated flow of goods and services from suppliers to customers and continuous flow of information from the customers to the suppliers. Covers the issues facing managers of import-export firms, trading companies, international service companies, and multinational corporations.

MBA593 Strategic Management (3 crs.)

Examines strategic analysis and decision making under conditions of dynamic uncertainty, with a focus on cross-functional integration and the management of processes and change. The importance of achieving a fit between the internal and external environment for organizational survival and success is a central issue.

Business Education, Information Technology for (BUS)

BUS220 American Business Systems (3 crs.)

Interdisciplinary approach to relationships existing between business firms and other institutions and individuals in American society. Deals with the historical background of modern business systems, basic tools of management, the productive process, marketing, finance, competition and risk, and the internal and external organization of business. Students in the College of Business may not satisfy business elective requirements with this course. This course may be taken by College of Business freshmen and sophomore students as a free elective. Not open to junior and senior business students. Open to all other majors.

BUS305 Business Information Processing I (3 crs.)

Focuses on information processing as it is used in competitive, contemporary business environments. Specific attention is on the use of page layout and design software for the preparation of a wide variety of business documents including, but not limited to, professional-quality real estate advertisements and flyers, project proposals, sales brochures, guidebooks, newsletters, and web pages. Prerequisite: ISM142 Business Computer Systems (or its equivalent).

BUS306 Business Information Processing II (3 crs.)

Focuses on advanced information processing using intermediate and advanced applications in the Microsoft Office software suite. Specific attention given to completion of projects requiring the integration of word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation applications in a client-based environment. Prerequisite: ISM 142 Business Computer Systems (or its equivalent).

BUS393 Selected Topics in Business (1-3 crs)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

BUS490 Selected Topics in Business (1-3 crs)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

Business Law (BSL)

BSL261 American Legal Environment (3 crs)

Deals with the nature and classification of the law, the history and framework of our legal system, our courts and court procedures, civil and criminal law, the principles of law applicable to business, and to the individual in these business relationships, i.e., contracts, agency and employer-employee relations, and the government regulation of business. Case studies included.

BSL262 Real Estate Law (3 crs.)

Study of the basic principles of modern real estate law including classification of property, types of ownership, acquisition and transfer, leasing, government regulation, and taxation. Emphasis placed on the real estate sale including the contract of sale. Prerequisite: BSL261.

BSL361 Business Law (3 crs.)

Surveys the basic principles of law applicable to sales of personal property, real property, negotiable instruments, partnerships, corporations, insurance, secured transactions, and bankruptcy. Case studies included. Prerequisite: BSL261.

Chemistry (CHM)

CHM103 A Cultural Approach (3 crs.)

Develops an understanding of the relationship between chemistry and our society and illustrates the way a scientist thinks about his science. Coverage will include discussion of elements, atoms, molecules, molecular properties, simple chemical reactions, nuclear energy, and man in his environment. May not be taken by students who are currently taking or who have successfully completed CHM121.

CHM105 An Observational Approach (3 crs.)

Develops an appreciation of modern chemistry through an integration of laboratory experimentation with lecture discussion. May be used as preparation for CHM121. Two periods lecture, three periods lab/week. May not be taken by students who are currently taking or who have successfully completed CHM121.

CHM121 Chemical Bonding (3 crs.)

Study of the structure of matter ranging from atoms through molecules to crystalline structures. Three periods lecture/week.

CHM122 Chemical Dynamics (3 crs.)

Study of the reactions of ions and molecules using thermodynamics, equilibrium and kinetics. Three periods lecture/week. Prerequisite: CHM121.

CHM123 Laboratory IA–Chemical Systems (2 crs.)

Detailed study of such topics as kinetics, enzyme reactions, complex ions, separation techniques, applications of radioactivity, and the collection of physical data. Six periods/week. Prerequisite or concurrent: CHM121.

CHM124 Laboratory IIA–Experimental Quantitative Analysis (2 crs.)

Deals with techniques of quantitative chemical determinations involving gravimetric and volumetric analysis, separation methods, and the fundamental application of instruments. Six periods/week. Prerequisite: CHM123 or CHM125; prerequisite/concurrent: CHM122.

CHM125 Laboratory IB–Stoichiometry and Reactions (1 cr.)

Provides investigation of elementary reactions and physical measurements. Three periods/week. Prerequisite or concurrent: CHM121.

CHM126 Laboratory IIB–Equilibrium and Instrumentation (1 cr.)

Study of equilibrium systems utilizing instrumental methods. Three periods/week. Prerequisite: CHM123 or CHM125; prerequisite or concurrent: CHM122.

CHM220 Bio-Instrumental Analysis (4 crs.)

Studies the various instrumental methods commonly used in biological chemical analysis. Spectrophotometry, flame photometry, atomic absorption, radiochemistry, osmometry, gas chromatography, blood gas analysis, cell counting, automatic analyzers, and computer applications are described and used in the laboratory. Elementary electronics also introduced. Prerequisites: CHM124, CHM222.

CHM221 Modern Organic Chemistry I (3 crs.)

Study of modern organic chemistry including structural theory, methods of structure determination, conformational analysis and other aspects of stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms, and the synthesis and characteristic reactions of hydrocarbons. Three periods of lecture/week. Prerequisite: CHM122.

CHM222 Modern Organic Chemistry II (3 crs.)

Continuation of Modern Organic Chemistry I and includes reactions and synthesis of the principle classes of organic compounds with an emphasis on application of mechanistic reasoning to the classification of organic reactions, further applications of spectroscopy to structure determination and mechanistic studies, and consideration of examples taken from the physical and life sciences. Three periods of lecture/week. Prerequisite: CHM221.

CHM223 Laboratory IIIA–Experimental Organic Techniques (2 crs.)

Involves application of the basic techniques of isolation, purification, and identification of organic compounds to the various types of synthetic sequences utilized in organic chemistry. Six periods/week. Prerequisite: CHM124 or CHM126; prerequisite/concurrent: CHM221.

CHM224 Laboratory IVA–Qualitative Organic Analysis (2 crs.)

Includes a workshop on structure determination by detailed consideration of spectral data for selected compounds and the identification in the laboratory of unknown polyfunctional compounds and mixtures. Six periods/week. Prerequisite: CHM223 or CHM225; prerequisite or concurrent: CHM222.

CHM225 Laboratory IIIB–Basic Organic Techniques (1 cr.)

Involves application of the basic techniques of isolation, purification, and identification of organic compounds to the various types of synthetic sequences utilized in organic chemistry. Three periods/week. Prerequisite: CHM124 or CHM126; prerequisite/concurrent: CHM221.

CHM226 Laboratory IVB–Experimental Organic Studies (1 cr.)

Continuation of Laboratory IIIB in which the basic techniques of modern organic chemistry are utilized in the study of organic reactions not previously considered and applied to the identification of principal compound types. Three periods/week. Prerequisite: CHM223 or CHM225; prerequisite/concurrent: CHM222.

CHM227 Introduction to Biochemistry (4 crs.)

Intended for biology majors who require only 4 semesters of chemistry. Lecture provides an introduction to the study of structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Also gives an overview of the metabolic pathways these molecules participate in within living cells. The lab teaches physical skills and techniques of modern experimental biochemistry and encourages students to think critically about data. Prerequisite: CHM221, CHM 225 and BIO116. This course cannot be used as a prerequisite CHM 301, CHM 420 or CHM 421. Students may not enroll in this course if already completed or enrolled in CHM 222.

CHM301 Biochemistry I (3 crs.)

Study of chemistry and metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids and the functions of enzymes, vitamins, and other controlling factors related to cellular metabolism. Principles of kinetics and thermodynamics are applied throughout. Three periods of lecture/week. Prerequisite: CHM222 and BIO116.

CHM309,310 Chemistry Internship (1-3 crs. each)

Study of various methods of research and development in a nonacademic environment. Study done in a laboratory and requires prior departmental and dean's approval. Requirements include faculty supervision and a written report.

CHM312, 313, 314, 315 Chemistry Seminar (1 cr. each)

Study of selected areas of chemical research. Students will attend seminars presented by students and faculty lecturers, participate in discussions of the seminar topics presented, and present one seminar prepared by library research. One period/week. Prerequisite: Junior status.

CHM361 Physical Chemistry I (4 crs.)

Study of theoretical chemistry, including phenomenological thermodynamics, equilibria, and kinetics. Related fundamental physiochemical measurements emphasized in the laboratory. Three periods lecture, three periods lab/week. Prerequisite: CHM222, MAT212, PHY205 or permission of instructor.

CHM362 Physical Chemistry II (4 crs.)

Continuing study of theoretical chemistry including quantum chemistry with applications to bonding and spectroscopy and statistical mechanics with applications to thermodynamics and kinetics. Related physiochemical measurements emphasized in the laboratory. Three periods lecture, three periods lab/week. Prerequisite: CHM361.

CHM371 Analytical Chemistry (4 crs.)

Presents instrumental analysis including UV-VIS spectrometry, mass spectrometry, gas and high performance liquid chromatography, nuclear methods, atomic absorption, ICP, polarography, potentiometry, X-ray, and NMR techniques. Three periods lecture, three periods lab/week. Graduate students may register without the laboratory for three credit hours. Prerequisite or concurrent: CHM361 or permission of instructor.

CHM381 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4 crs.)

Presents a general overview of inorganic chemistry. Topics include periodic trends, group theory, molecular orbital theory, acid/base theory, redox chemistry, coordination chemistry, spectroscopy of transition metal complexes, reaction mechanisms of d-block complexes, organometallic chemistry, and bioinorganic chemistry. Three periods lecture, three periods lab/week. Prerequisite: CHM361.

CHM393 Selected Topics in Chemistry (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

CHM396 Research III (1-2 crs.)

See description under CHM398.

CHM397 Introduction to Research (Semester I) (1-2 crs.)

See description under CHM398 (Semester II).

CHM398 Introduction to Research (Semester II) (1-2 crs.)

Includes original investigations in analytical, organic, physical, biochemistry, or inorganic chemistry. A formal, comprehensive research report and a seminar presentation are required upon completion of these experimental studies.A combined total of 3 credits in research courses (CHM 396, CHM 397, or CHM 398 are required for all chemistry majors expecting American Chemical Society accreditation; optional for all others. A student should enroll for two consecutive semesters of research. Course credit is one or two credit hours per semester with no less than two or more than four granted for the entire year. Prerequisites: CHM361, CHM371, CHM381, a passing grade in all areas of the Junior Comprehensive Examination with a grade of G (good) or better in the specific area or areas of research.

CHM415 Topics in Medicinal Chemistry (3 crs.)

Study of basic principles of organic chemistry and pharmacology used in the design of chemical substances that interact with biological systems. Discussion centers on molecular basis for drug action, structure activity relationships, and methods of synthesis of the important classes of drug substances. Prerequisites: CHM221 and CHM222.

CHM420 Biochemistry II (3 crs.)

Extension of CHM301. Develops to a greater depth the topics of bioorganic chemistry, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms, intermediary metabolism and metabolic controls, and certain selected topics which are necessary for an understanding of modern biochemistry. Prerequisite: CHM301.

CHM421 Biochemistry Laboratory (1 cr.)

Introduces various laboratory techniques essential to the practice of modern biochemistry including separations, purification, and analytical methods. Prerequisite or concurrent: CHM301.

CHM450 Studies in Physical Chemistry (3 crs.)

Studies selected topics in advanced physical chemistry with extensive use made of current literature in the field. Topics are chosen from quantum chemistry, statistical thermodynamics, catalysis, molecular spectra, and molecular structure. Prerequisite: CHM362 or permission of instructor.

CHM460 Instrumental Analysis (3 crs.)

Laboratory course with study of the following instrumental methods of analysis: fluorescence, X-ray, atomic absorption, flame emission, mass spectrometry, high pressure liquid chromatography, and nuclear techniques. Students perform analyses with all instruments. Short discussion period precedes each laboratory exercise. Prerequisite: CHM362 or permission of instructor.

CHM480 Organic Reactions and Mechanisms (3 crs.)

Concerned with theoretical organic chemistry with emphasis given to stereochemistry, electronic theory, reaction mechanisms, and the application of physical methods to organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHM222 or permission of instructor.

CHM490 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

Communication/Journalism (COM)

COM211 Introduction to Mass Communication (3 crs.)

Studies the structure and functions of the mass media in the United States. Examines from both theoretical and practical viewpoints the nature of the communicator, the nature of the audience, and the nature of the mass communication experience.

COM212 Media Writing (3 crs.)

Introduces the variety of mass communication mediums students may encounter in their professional careers. Focuses on preparation and presentation of various mass communication formats. Examines message construction, framing and interpretation from the perspective of print and electronic media, public relations, and advertising. Study of grammar, spelling, and Associated Press news style also a focus. A proficiency exam will be given during the semester. Students must pass the proficiency test with a C or better to pass the course.

COM224 Writing for Broadcast Media (3 crs.)

Opportunity to write for radio and television including news, commercials, public service announcements, editorials, and radio music scripts. Keyboard skills required. Prerequisite COM 212.

COM285 News Writing and Reporting (3 crs.)

Introduces basic news story genres. Emphasis on perception and selection of data from written reports, interviews, speeches, meetings, and the performing arts. Provides laboratory writing experiences. Keyboard skills required.

COM290 Advertising Copywriting (3 crs.)

Emphasis on writing advertising copy and headlines. Also examines design and layout of advertising for print and electronic media. Prerequisite: COM380.

COM293 Editing (3 crs.)

Devoted to the many responsibilities of the copy editor, including copy editing, head writing, and dummying pages. Prerequisite: COM285.

COM320 Communication Law (3 crs.)

Familiarizes students with legal and self-imposed regulation of mass communications in the United States. Deals, at a minimum, with libel, privacy, obscenity, free press/fair trial, contempt of court, copyright and legal and quasi-legal provisions, and agencies affecting advertising and radio and television. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

COM325 Current Strategies in Electronic Media Programming (3 crs.)

Provides insights into the programming of individual radio and television stations as well as those of major television and cable networks in the United States. Emphasis on issues involving program creation and development, scheduling, audience preferences, and broadcast and cable rating techniques.

COM331 Radio Production and Performance (3 crs.)

Initial production skills course designed for student with no previous experience who wishes to concentrate in the field of radio broadcasting. Focuses on duties of a radio performer/producer. Introduces student to techniques and procedures used by professional radio broadcasters and to aid the student in the development of basic broadcast skills.

COM335 Media Advertising and Sales (3 crs.)

Examines sales function of advertising in commercial media including newspapers, magazines, radio, television, and the Internet. Theory and practical application in media advertising, sales, and research are explored. Media competitive advantages and disadvantages as well as sales techniques of each mass medium discussed.

COM338 Electronic Media Management and Regulation (3 crs.)

Involves the goal establishment, decision making, and policy execution processes of electronic media management and regulation, including broadcast and cable radio and television and the Internet. Provides the theoretical and practical bases of broadcast, cable, and Internet management and leadership and views these elements from the perspective of upper and middle management positions.

COM360 Introduction to Photography (3 crs.)

Introduces principles of photography and teaches basic competencies to produce black and white photographs. Students study history of photography, the techniques of photographic composition, and the basic processes of producing camera images in the darkroom. Assignments designed to teach how creative visual communication is achieved through use of black and white photography. Emphasis on practical technique of processing and printing black and white negatives. Students expected to develop an understanding of the relationship of photography to their professional goals.

COM362 Photojournalism (3 crs.)

For students who have an understanding of basic photographic equipment and photographic techniques. Examines and explores use of visual communication techniques in print media and websites. Covers history of photojournalism, technical aspects of photojournalism, and modern visual communication production techniques in both traditional and digital formats. Assignments designed to teach how to produce and edit visual elements and combine them with text for both print and web-based publications. Prerequisite: COM360.

COM370 Television Production (3 crs.)

Introduction to fundamentals of television production. Students obtain experience in the various roles of the television team including producer, director, floor manager, cameraman, etc., in correlated laboratory sessions.

COM375 Public Affairs Reporting (3 crs.)

Provides instruction in methods of gathering and reporting in the mass media information about government and politics, law enforcement agencies and the courts, labor, business and finance, and agriculture. Prerequisite: COM285.

COM376 Feature Writing (3 crs.)

Deals with specialized writing for newspapers and magazines and offers instruction and practice in developing ideas for articles, using research methods, and writing for mass audiences. Keyboarding skills required.

COM378 Computer-Assisted Reporting (3 crs.)

Introduces use of computers in developing, researching, and writing specialized statistical-based stories for newspapers and magazines. Students learn to cull web-based and digital databases for information, analyze and synthesize statistical information, develop story ideas through on-line and database searches, and write coherent stories based on the information. Keyboard skills required.

COM380 Public Relations (3 crs.)

Introductory course dealing with role and function of public relations in society. Emphasizes the application of theory and principles to the practice of public relations.

COM381 Promotional Publication Design (3 crs.)

Offers writers and designers study in print and web-based communication with primary emphasis on desktop publishing (Macintosh) and web-based publishing (DreamWeaver® and other web software). Examines practical application of basic contemporary design to printed and web-based materials such as newsletters, booklets, pamphlets, and advertising messages.

COM395, 396, 398 Internship I, II, and III (1-6 crs.)

Internship of three credit hours can be earned for service in an approved field. Qualifications include junior or senior class standing; 2.5 or higher QPA in the major; completion of at least five courses in the major, including courses necessary for successful work in the internship position; completion of a written analysis of the experience as prescribed by the faculty supervisor; approval of the communication/journalism faculty. Applications must be processed in advance through the Department of Communication/Journalism. Prerequisite: Junior standing and departmental permission.

COM400 Public Relations Writing (3 crs.)

Provides public relations majors with a variety of public relations writing experiences most likely to be encountered in business, government, education, journalism, and community organizations and offers practical exercises in progressive sequence. Different evaluation criteria applied to graduate/undergraduate students.

COM451 Electronic Field Production (3 crs.)

Designed to develop and train visual essayists—single camera videographers who link pictures, words, and sound to create electronic stories. Creates, develops, and polishes skills and techniques needed to produce video documentaries, corporate videos, and live event productions. Skills and techniques developed include telling the visual story without words; writing and shooting long-form TV stories, interviews, and features; learning visual grammar; perfecting video editing; and developing on-camera performance availabilities. Prerequisites: A television production course and a television writing course or permission of instructor.

COM452 Electronic News Gathering (3 crs.)

Focus is preparation for careers as professional electronic journalists. Emphasizes development of news judgment, journalistic responsibilities, and journalistic ethics. Students work in classroom and television environments to acquire and improve reporting, writing, and technical skills needed to succeed in the electronic newsroom. Introduces the culture of the broadcast news environment, including meeting deadlines and working in a team environment both in the field and in the newsroom. Prerequisites: A television production course and a televising writing course or permission of instructor.

COM460 Case Studies in Public Relations (3 crs.)

Reviews current public relations principles and practices as related to business, governments, institutions, and associations. Examines the application of PR principles and practices in the management of contemporary public issues and problems. Different evaluation criteria applied to graduate/undergraduate students.

COM470 Digital Photography (3 crs.)

Introduces principles of digital photography and teaches basic competencies to apply standard photo concepts to the realm of digital imaging. Students study history of digital photography, techniques of composition, and basic processes of producing digital photographs from electronic and traditional camera images. Emphasis on practical technique with electronic equipment (cameras, scanners, photo CDs, and other methods of image acquisition) and the manipulation of images through applications like Adobe Photoshop. Students are expected to develop an understanding of the relationship of digital photography to their professional goals. Different evaluation criteria applied to graduate/undergraduate students.

COM475 Book Production (3 crs.)

Principles and laboratory practices in book design and production. Topics include analysis of principles of design and layout; observing principles of typography; graphics; digital and traditional photography; titles and chapter headings; ethics of publishing; history and impact on society; promotional techniques; working with book editors; specialization; market positioning and launching. Visits to publishing houses. Graduate students conduct market research and participate directly in publishing projects in process, including proofreading, copyediting, and preparation for submission to authors and publishers

COM476 Magazine Design (3 crs.)

Provides opportunity to examine, discuss, and create periodical publications (magazines) in a variety of specialized formats. Develops skills in understanding and creating periodical publications by focusing on writing and design. Examines a variety of magazines to provide an understanding of content, typography, design, layout, and production. Students learn to develop promotional materials necessary to help develop an audience for a periodical publication. Students write and edit several stories for their own publication, which they create as a final project for the course. Students produce a 32-page magazine as this final project. Graduate students taking this course will conduct market research analysis and a strategic promotional plan in addition to standard coursework.

COM481 Interactive Media Design (3 crs.)

Study in interactive communication with primary emphasis on desktop publishing (Macintosh) and the practical application of contemporary interactive design to print and on-line materials and messages using the Macromedia Director design program. Prerequisite: Rudimentary experience with Apple OSX or permission of instructor. Different evaluation criteria applied to graduate/undergraduate students.

COM482 Internet Communication (3 crs.)

Introductory course with the fundamental knowledge concerning the construction, use, and importance of world wide web media for the communications industries. Students construct an actual website concentrating on the usability of web pages and websites while applying skills gained in class to work with real world clients.

COM490, 491, 492 Selected Topics in Communication/Journalism (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

COM499 Communication/Journalism senior Capstone (3 crs.)

Required for all graduating seniors. It provides an integration of previous courses in and outside the major. Students analyze and synthesize past learning and relate it to issues and problems in mass communication. Course requirements tailored to meet each student's specific career plans or career focus. Focus on assisting students in establishing a professional identity. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

COM500 Communication Theory (3 crs.)

Analyzes communication theory as it relates to media and audiences and studies the effects of communications on the attitudes and actions of society.

COM511 Modes of Film Communication (3 crs.)

Reviews the theory, history, and criticisms of films; analyzes the content and roles of various modes of film such as documentary, exposition, etc.; provides writing opportunities for the film medium.

COM516 Photographic Communication (3 crs.)

Surveys the history of photography; studies the theory of photography including light, exposure, optics, photographic chemistry, color and composition, and provides background in using photography as a communication tool.

COM526 Emerging Mass Media Technologies (3 crs.)

Reviews and analyzes the role of developing and future telecommunications media technologies and their implication for today's media and society.

COM530 Law and the Media (3 crs.)

In-depth study of the law that affects media. Focuses on the reasoning behind regulation, the impact of the laws, and the need for changes in current regulatory schemes. Legal research skills and methods are stressed.

COM536 World Broadcasting Systems (3 crs.)

Comparative study of international broadcasting program policies, economic systems, control, and organization. The use of broadcasting in international affairs as an instrument of propaganda, culture, and information dissemination. Monitoring of overseas broadcasts, and discussions with representatives of domestic and foreign broadcast agencies.

COM544 Advanced Communication Problems (3 crs.)

Students identify a communication problem related to their professional project or to their thesis. Students then suggest possible solutions and produce or procure the materials needed to implement the solution chosen. Prerequisite: COM500.

COM561 Press and Public Affairs (3 crs.)

Investigates the relationship between print and electronic mass communication systems and local, state, and national governments, including regulatory agencies and barriers to the free flow of information. Considers the roles and functions of the press in reporting public affairs in the light of topical issues.

COM570 Fund Raising and Association Public Relations (3 crs.)

Introduction to the fundamentals of raising funds for education, religious, health, and social welfare organizations. Study includes a review of the conventional techniques used in reaching traditional funding sources. Association organization, membership development, and volunteer support round out the course.

COM594 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

COM600 Introduction to Mass Communication Research (3 crs.)

Surveys major trends in mass communication research, including sociological and psychological perspectives, which have built our knowledge about how communication systems work. Through the examination of classic studies in the mass communication field, the student is introduced to a variety of research settings and techniques including readability, persuasion, content analysis, interviewing, questionnaire design and sampling. Prerequisite: COM500.

COM603 Professional Project in Mass Communications (3 crs.)

Students design a project of professional and intellectual interest that contributes both to their knowledge and to the field of communication/journalism. Prerequisites: COM500, 544, 561, 600. (This is an individualized instruction course open only to students who are working with an adviser on the professional project option.)

COM609 Internship I (3 crs.)

COM610 Internship II (3 crs.)

COM612 Thesis I (3 crs.)

Prerequisite: Prior approval of department chair.

COM613 Thesis II (3 crs.)

Prerequisite: Prior approval of department chair.

 

Computer Science (CSC)

CSC103 Overview of Computer Science (3 crs.)

Breadth-first overview of computer science introducing students to a wide range of topics, including algorithms, hardware design, computer organization, system software, language models, programming, compilation, theory of computation, artificial intelligence, or social issues involving computing.

CSC110 Computer Science I (4 crs.)

Introduction to computer programming from an object-oriented perspective. Students complete several programs with emphasis on good software engineering principles and development of good programming skills. Will implement complete programs using an object-oriented programming language and development environment. Topics include fundamental programming techniques including algorithm design, documentation, style, and debugging; fundamental program constructs including simple data types and control structures; fundamental object-oriented techniques including classes, abstraction, polymorphism, inheritance and encapsulation; and fundamental software engineering principles.

CSC111 Computer Science II (4 crs.)

Intermediate course in software design and development. Reinforces proficiency with core programming techniques by developing more challenging programs than in CSC110 and will apply more advanced techniques and data structures such as recursion, file I/O, iterators, trees, etc. to create advanced programs and solutions. Students will improve their solutions to enhance efficiency and soundness. Topics include intermediate programming techniques; using advanced data types including multi-dimensional arrays, queues, lists, tables, trees, and maps; intermediate software design; intermediate problem solving techniques (such as recursion); fundamental algorithm analysis and design; intermediate object oriented design including classes, abstraction, polymorphism, inheritance, and encapsulation. Prerequisites: CSC110 and successful completion of the Programming Competency Exam.

CSC180 Microcomputer Basic (3 crs.)

Studies BASIC programming including microcomputers. Topics include structured algorithm design, looping, functions and subroutines, graphics, and files. Will learn which elements of BASIC are standard and which vary from machine to machine. A survey of applications software which is available and a description of the hardware components will round out the students' knowledge of microcomputers. Course is not available to those who have already taken ISM143 or CSC110. Also, course is not available to computer science (B.S.) for major credit.

CSC210 Data Structures and Algorithms (4 crs.)

Students design and build standard data structures using an inheritance hierarchy, abstract classes, and polymorphism. Associated algorithms are analyzed from an intuitive rather than rigorous mathematical point of view. Topics include algorithm analysis, fundamental data structures, design patterns, lists, stacks, graphs, trees, and advanced data structures. Prerequisites: CSC111 and MAT225.

CSC220 Computer Organization (4 crs.)

Introduces organization and architecture of computer systems from the standard von Neumann model to more recent architectural concepts. Internal structure and organization of a computer lead to significant differences in performance and functionality, giving rise to an extraordinary range of computing devices from hand-held computer to large-scale, high performance machines. To gain a better understanding of exactly how a computer functions, students will write programs in a common assembly language. Prerequisite: CSC110.

CSC310 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (4 crs.)

Examines various techniques for designing algorithms and analyzing their efficiencies, and examines and compares their efficiency of execution. Studies the theoretical foundations for analysis of algorithms and the ramifications of design strategies on efficiency. Prerequisites: CSC210 and MAT225.

CSC320 Operating Systems (4 crs.)

An operating system provides an abstract interface with which programmers can control hardware. Study includes both the use of operating systems (externals) and their design and implementation (internals). Includes laboratories to simulate or experiment with operating system concepts. Topics include overview of operating systems, processes and concurrency, memory management, scheduling, input/output and file systems, system performance evaluation ethics, and security. Prerequisite: CSC220.

CSC350 Introduction to Computer Graphics (4 crs.)

Provides a non-mathematical introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of computer graphics. Topics include real-world vs. synthetic image creation; graphics primitives; interaction and animation; I/O hardware environment; 3-D modeling and viewing; color, light, and shading; segments; textures; realistic effects. A typical graphics API (e.g., OpenGL) is used to create computer-generated images. Prerequisite: CSC210.

CSC371 Database Management Systems (4 crs.)

Detailed examination of theory and practical issues underlying the design, development, and use of a DBMS. Topics include characteristics of a well-designed database; high-level representation of an application using ER modeling; functional dependency theory, normalization, and their application toward a well-designed database; abstract query languages; query languages; concurrency; integrity; security. Advanced topics may be included (e.g., distributed databases; object-oriented databases). Theory to practice is applied in a number of projects involving the design, creation, and use of a database. Prerequisite: CSC210.

CSC390 COMPUTER SCIENCE INTERNSHIP I (3 CRS.)

CSC391 COMPUTER SCIENCE INTERNSHIP I I (3 CRS.)

CSC392 COMPUTER SCIENCE INTERNSHIP III (3 CRS.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

CSC 393 SELECTED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (4 CRS.)

Opportunity to offer courses of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses. Prerequisite: Junior major status or permission of instructor.

CSC394 Software Metrics/Process Management (4 crs.)

Explores and evaluates current methods of measuring the software development process. The need for such measurement is motivated by application of the Personal Software Process. Techniques for gathering and analyzing common metrics used to support process improvement. Prerequisites: CSC210 and MAT313.

CSC401 Simulation Techniques (4 crs.)

Study of the statistical and modeling techniques necessary to build credible models. Techniques for gathering real world data and analyzing for model building and verification. Techniques for gathering data from models including sensitivity analysis, steady state analysis, and variance reduction techniques. Credible "what if" analysis for comparing two models. Prerequisite: MAT313.

CSC420 Real-Time and Embedded Software (4 crs.)

In-depth study of issues involved in developing software for real-time study and/or embedded systems. Demands and architecture of real-time operating systems. Performance and benchmarking. Issues in designing for performance. Mission-critical and safety-critical systems. Software engineering tools and techniques specific to these systems. Prerequisite: CSC320.

CSC431 Computer Networks (4 crs.)

Studies protocol suites, emphasizing the TCP/IP 4-layer model. Topics included are network addresses, sub netting, client/server network programming via the sockets API, network utilities, architecture of packets, routing, fragmentation, connection and termination, connection-less applications, data flow, and an examination of necessary protocols at the link layer, particularly Ethernet. Other topics may include FDDI, wireless, ATM, congestion control, and network security. Prerequisites: CSC210 and CSC320.

CSC432 Computer Security (4 crs.)

Topics include cryptography (both secret and public key), authentication, and network security applications including IP, e-mail, web, network management, and system security. Prerequisite: CSC210.

CSC434 Web Programming (4 crs.)

Teaches how to set up a website typical of one used in an on-line business. Includes preparing web pages in HTML, writing client-side scripts in Vbscript or JavaScript for active web pages, writing server-side scripts in Vbscript for active server pages, learning to set up and access a database for processing on-line ordering and searches, and some web server administration. Students will establish a website for an imaginary business of their choosing. Prerequisite: CSC371.

CSC440 Compiler Design (4 crs.)

Introduction to design and implementation of compilers. General principles of compiler design are covered with emphasis on the following components: scanner, parser, semantic analyzer, code optimizer, and code generation. Symbol tables and error handling also covered. Includes implementation of a compiler for a simple language. Prerequisites: CSC210 and CSC220.

CSC450 Advanced Computer Graphics (4 crs.)

Introduction to a high-level 3-D renderer, the animation process, and advanced computer graphics topics. Majority devoted to learning 3-D modeling and animation techniques using a 3-D renderer, including topics such as object modeling, lighting, and key framing. Additional topics may include shadow generation, object interaction, and the comparison of various graphics APIs. Projects will involve modeling with a 3-D renderer as well as a standard graphics package (e.g., OpenGL). Prerequisite: CSC350.

CSC 451 Computer Graphics Algorithms (4 crs.)

Explores the algorithmic foundations that underlie a typical computer graphics API. Topics include normals; 2-D and 3-D transformation matrices; projection matrices; clipping, raster scan algorithms; fill algorithms; hidden line and surface algorithms; light, color, and shading algorithms; curve fitting; surface representation. Students will implement various aspects of a computer graphics API. Prerequisites: CSC350 and MAT318.

CSC462 Artificial Intelligence (4 crs.)

Overview of artificial intelligence. Emphasis on basic tools of AI, search and knowledge representation, and their application to a variety of AI problems. Search methods include depth-first, breadth-first, and AI algorithms; knowledge representation schemes include propositional and predicate logics, semantic nets and frames, and scripts. Planning using a STRIPS-like planner will also be addressed. Areas that may be addressed include natural language processing, computer vision, robotics, expert systems, and machine learning. Prerequisite: CSC210.

CSC463 Introduction to Robotics (4 crs.)

Introduces the science of robotics from the perspective of artificial intelligence. Emphasizes various robot control architectures and their implementations using mobile robots. Topics include history of robotics; hierarchical, reactive, and hybrid architectures; Braitenberg vehicles; integration and calibration of sensors; construction techniques and considerations; and implementation of various types of behaviors. Prerequisites: CSC210 and CSC220.

CSC 493 Selected Topics In Computer Science (4 CRS.)

Presents topics which will vary according to need. Topics such as languages are appropriate.

CSC496 Traditional Life Cycle (4 crs.)

Students in teams develop solutions to real world problems in order to experience the traditional software development life cycle. Topics include project management, requirements analysis, system design, detailed design, implementation, unit test, integration test, system test, and ethics. Prerequisite: CSC210.

CSC497 Testing and Extreme Programming (4 crs.)

Study of testing software including test case design, automated testing, and test coverage. Ways testing can be used to drive the life cycle as in extreme programming (XP). Through a series of testing labs, debugging techniques and XP methodology will be practiced. Student teams will develop at least two iterations of a product using XP (particularly test driven development) practices.

CSC498 Senior Research Methods (2 crs.)

Students will learn basic research strategies including conducting literature reviews, designing experiments, defining hypotheses, and writing proposals. Topics include finding and evaluating sources of information, defining topics, developing and supporting a hypotheses, and acceptable research and experimental practices. Prerequisite: Graduate students are not permitted to take this course.

CSC499 Senior Research and Development (2 crs.)

Students will independently, but under the direction of the instructor, execute the proposal developed in CSC498. Students will conduct the experiments outlined in their testing / implementation plan. Students will then analyze the results and determine if their hypothesis was supported or not. The goal is to gain experience with a formal development process and understand how the scientific method, mathematical reasoning, logic, and algorithmic thinking will generate concrete answers to problems. Prerequisite: Completion of CSC498 with a C or better. Graduate students are not permitted to take this course.

 

CSC500 Discrete Structures of Computer Science (3 crs.)

Introduction to theoretical and mathematical underpinnings of computer science. Topics include prepositional and predicate logic and their application to software specification; regular expressions, BNF automata and other finite state machines including their implementations, Turing machines and computability; techniques for run-time analysis including the Big-Oh and Big-Imega notations, discrete probability and elementary combinatorics.

CSC510 Object Oriented Programming I (3 crs.)

Introduction to programming with a high-level language. Emphasis on good program construction, including top-down design, documentation, testing, and debugging. Addresses basic data types and control structures, and their appropriate use. Various abstract data types and algorithms will be introduced.

CSC511 Object Oriented Programming II (3 crs.)

Continues introduction to programming from CSC510. Includes classic techniques for algorithm design and implementation including brute force, recursion, dynamic programming, and greedy strategies. Abstraction and encapsulation through classic data structures. Introduction to basic algorithm analysis and software engineering principles. Prerequisite: CSC510.

CSC512 Event Driven Programming (3 crs.)

Emphasizes Windows programming through the usage of Microsoft Foundation Classes. The IDE, Visual Studio, serves as the vehicle for application development. Commonly used subset of the MFC hierarchy serves as the backbone of the applications; primary classes are CDialog, CFrameWnd, and CWinApp. Particular applications are done for the standard GUI controls using messages and the handlers thereof. IDE-supplied resources and language is used in implementation. Prerequisite: CSC511.

CSC520 Computer Organization (3 crs.)

Introduction to computer architecture, operating systems, and communications. Topics include number and coding systems, overview of microprocessors, supporting chips, memory and memory interfacing, I/O design, timers, interrupts and interrupt processing, DMAs, video adapters, data communication, keyboard and printer interfacing, disk storage, TSRs, and bus architectures.

CSC521 Operating Systems (3 crs.)

Studies functionality of an operating system and design of efficient operating system components. Definition of a kernel and higher-level functions of operating systems, CSC scheduling algorithms. Interprocess communication including semaphores with busy-wait and idle-wait. Deadlock, the dining philosophers problem and starvation. Resource allocation. The bankers Algorithm. Virtual memory architectures. Introduction to distributed operating systems. Prerequisite: CSC520.

CSC522 Parallel Architectures (3 crs.)

Studies of various forms of parallelism. Analysis of pipelined processors and the effects of branching. Analysis of single and multi-state interconnection networks including star, ring, hypercube, and Benes networks. Massively parallel computing with array machines, shared memory, and distributed memory multiprocessor computers. Applications/algorithms for parallel computers. Distributed shared memory systems including memory and cache coherence. Prerequisite: CSC520.

CSC530 Computer Networks and Communications (3 crs.)

Provides an understanding of the theoretical and conceptual components of computer networks and communications. Topics include: network topology, protocols and routing algorithms, and network design issues. Topics are discussed vis-à-vis simple point-to-point networks, shared media networks like the Ethernet, token ring, ATM and the Internet. Students will also learn how to write network applications using the client server model.

CSC531 Web Programming (3 crs.)

Introduction to developing a complete website. Includes designing web pages, frames, forms, and form processing, cascading style sheets, various scripting languages, database access, client-serve programming and active service pages. A significant web development project will be required. Prerequisite: CSC570.

CSC570 Database Management Systems (3 crs.)

Examines the theory and practical issues under-lying the design, development, and use of a DBMS. Topics include characteristics well-designed databases; high-level representation of an application using ER modeling: functional dependency using ER modeling, functional dependency theory, normalization and application toward a well-designed database; abstract query languages; query languages; concurrency; integrity; security. Advanced topics may be included. Students apply theory to practice in a number of projects involving design, creation, and use of a database. Prerequisite: CSC510.

CSC590 Testing and Debugging Strategies (3 crs.)

Covers disciplined development test cases for program verification. Classes of tests including glass box tests and black box tests will be developed for unit test, collaboration test, inheritance tests, and collection tests. Tools and strategies for debugging will be explored. Labs will consist of a sequence of broken programs that the student will test and debug. Research into testing strategies will be explored. Prerequisites: CSC510 and scheduled for CSC511.

CSC599 Advanced Topics in Computer Science (3 crs.)

Students will research an emerging topic in computer science. In addition to reading appropriate journal articles, students may develop empirical studies to evaluate the current theoretical results.

 

Counseling (CNS)

CNS490 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

CNS502 The Role of the Elementary Counselor (3 crs.)

Provides the prospective elementary school counselor with an understanding of concepts and techniques essential to the counseling and guidance process in the elementary school. A major consideration is the emerging role of the elementary counselor and his/her relationship to other pupil personnel services at that level. Prerequisites: Completion of Phase I of program and CNS585.

CNS505 Organization and Administration of School Counseling Services (3 crs.)

Studies basic philosophy, principles, and current trends in the organization and administration of comprehensive school counseling programs. Emphasis is given to line-staff organization, guidance committees, counselor-teacher relationships, adult-community guidance services and roles of school personnel and community agencies in understanding and promoting the school-community guidance programs. Prerequisites: Completion of Phase I of program and CNS585.

CNS508 Marital, Couple and Family Counseling (3 crs.)

Designed to aid student in gaining experience and competency in the use of therapeutic interventions with married person, couple, and families. Emphasis on the understanding of prominent theoretical modalities and applying the relevant techniques to classroom simulations. Students gain understanding and experience in dealing therapeutically with typical marital, couple, and family problematic concerns. Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I or permission of instructor.

CNS509 Multicultural Counseling (3 crs.)

Designed to sensitize students and promote an understanding of their own self as a cultural being and to acquire expertise in the use of therapeutic interventions with diverse populations. Emphasis on the learning of approaches and application of techniques that facilitate intra- and intergroup and multicultural experiences.

CNS510 Drug and Alcohol Counseling (3 crs.)

Designed to aid students in gaining understanding of the theories of causation and treatment of alcohol and drug addiction abuse. Students also gain experience and competency in the use of therapeutic interventions and techniques through classroom simulations. Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I or permission of instructor.

CNS512 Group Counseling Leadership Skills (3 crs.)

Provides a didactic and experiential overview of a variety of group theories and group types. Particular attention given to tools and techniques necessary to function effectively in the role of group leader. Emphasis on both the acquisition of knowledge and the skills of group leadership theories and techniques. Prerequisite: CNS578 or concurrent registration with permission of instructor.

CNS515 Career Development (3 crs.)

Stresses development of counselor competencies in the areas of collecting, evaluating, classifying, filing, and using accurate occupational, educational and personal-social informational materials. Also considered are theories of vocational choice, the psychology and sociology of work, vocational interests and aptitudes, the relationship of school and college subjects to jobs and the use of information in helping students decide on matters of curricular choice. Counseling interviews are employed to give students practical experiences in the use of informational materials with counselees.

CNS519 Implications for Human Development for Counseling (3 crs.)

Specifically designed for counselors. Content is rooted in developmental theory with an emphasis on identity development. Professional counselors pay particular attention to our clients' development across the lifespan; implications of their development on all aspects of life weigh importantly on the way we conceptualize clients' challenges, adjustments, disorders, and growth. The information and experiences gained will serve as a structural foundation for understanding theories of development and their significance in the work we as professional counselors perform.

CNS522 Assessment Techniques in Counseling and Student Affairs (3 crs.)

Detailed study of collecting meaningful information about individuals and their environment through both testing and non-testing procedures. Emphasis is on understanding the information in order to help individuals cope with concerns and make decisions. Prerequisite: CNS600.

CNS524 Classification of Psychopathology (3 crs.)

Studies the classification system of psychopathology. Special emphasis placed on building counseling models based on the integration of the classification and the client's individual situation.

CNS530 Clinical Supervision Theory and Techniques (3 crs.)

Designed to help counselors in a variety of settings to develop and/or enhance their professional functioning as clinical supervisors. No prior supervision experience is necessary. A concurrent experience providing supervision will be included in the course. Prerequisite: A master's degree in counseling or its equivalent.

CNS531 Advanced Study in Multicultural Issues (3 crs.)

Designed for current practitioners in helping services who already have earned a master's degree who desire to expand knowledge and skills in working with diverse populations and in creating a society where "freedom and justice for all" can become a reality. Prerequisite: A master's degree in counseling or its equivalent.

CNS532 Advanced Drug and Alcohol Counseling (3 crs.)

Acquaints student with the concept of alcohol and drug dependence as a primary, progressive, chronic, potentially fatal, and symptomatic disease that impacts the entire family system. Explores the disease from a bio-psycho-social and spiritual perspective as well as demonstrating various multidisciplinary approaches to arresting and successfully treating the illness. Attention to principles of early intervention, prevention, special populations, and standards necessary for achieving certification as an addiction counselor in Pennsylvania. Explores the developmental models of recovery, relapse prevention methods, and treating the dually diagnosed client. Course is designed to prepare students as facilitators who can utilize addiction concepts and skills in a variety of counseling settings. Prerequisite: Master's degree in counseling or its equivalent.

CNS534 Treatment of DSM IV-TR Disorders (3 crs.)

Designed to engage practicing counselors in expanding their knowledge of the current DSM Disorders and its implication for developing treatment interventions and strategies. The classification system of pathology will be reviewed and current knowledge about the clinical presentation, etiology, and diagnosis of commonly encountered disorders will be explored. Models and theories that guide interventions and typical treatment settings will be discussed. Students will develop protocols for treatment and will be responsible for presenting these to class members. Prerequisite: Master's degree in counseling or its equivalent.

CNS536 Counseling Challenging Adolescents (3 crs.)

Students will learn several unique ways of joining, finding empathy, developing and sustaining healthy boundaries, and creating ways of containing all that the most challenging adolescent clients bring to the therapeutic counseling relationship. A wide variety of professional counseling and therapy settings will be considered. Prerequisite: Master's degree in counseling or its equivalent.

CNS537 Eating Disorders Across Gender, Cultural, and Racial Lines (3 crs.)

Designed to provide enhanced knowledge and in-depth understanding of the etiology of food and body image issues. Includes exploration of obsessions, compulsions, societal morays, and multiple messages and their effect on many groups of people. Prerequisite: Master's degree in counseling or its equivalent.

CNS541 Introduction to Adlerian Psychology (1 cr.)

Overview of Adlerian Psychology, including the history and major principles. Alfred Adler's contributions to psychology are based on the need to understand individuals within their social context. Mutual respect, social equality, holism, cooperation, lifestyle, purposive behavior, goal orientation, encouragement, family constellation, and social interest, are just some of the principles. Covers theory and its application to one's specific setting and discipline. Prerequisite: At least a bachelor's or master's degree in counseling, psychology, education, social work, administration, or business.

CNS542 Adlerian Principles in the Workplace (2 crs.)

Students learn Adlerian Psychology helps improve human relations in all settings, including the workplace. Work roles, conflict resolution, group dynamics, and personality variables are viewed within the Adlerian framework. Attention given to the culture of the workplace. Workplace solutions are applicable also to problems in the family and school. Participants' own work problems are discussed. Prerequisite: At least a bachelor's or master's degree in counseling, psychology, education, social work, administration or business and CNS541.

CNS543 Assessment Techniques in Adlerian Psychology (3 crs.)

Provides tools and techniques to understand individuals within their social context. In this didactic and experiential course, students will practice assessing lifestyle themes through lifestyle interviews, family constellations, early recollections, dreams, genograms, etc. One aspect will be the use of an objective instrument to understand one's own lifestyle as well as for assessing others. Prerequisite: At least a bachelor's or master's degree in counseling, psychology, education, social work, administration, or business and CNS541.

CNS544 Adlerian Principles in the Schools (2 crs.)

Designed for all school personnel to work toward a shared goal of motivating students to do well academically and to become responsible, contributing, happy, fulfilled citizens through encouragement-based strategies. These methods include democratic leadership, classroom meetings, respectful communications, natural and logical consequences, and understanding what students need to succeed. Prerequisite: At least a bachelor's or master's degree in counseling, psychology, education, social work, administration, or business and CNS541.

CNS545 Leadership by Encouragement (3 crs.)

Provides a forum for students to learn how the principles and methods of Adlerian Psychology can be used to enhance leadership potential. Focus on assessing leadership style, listening, motivation, enhancing teamwork and productivity, and encouragement. Prerequisite: At least a bachelor's or master's degree in counseling, psychology, education, social work, administration, or business.

CNS546 Parent Education and Family Counseling (2 crs.)

Provides instruction in the practice and theory of parent education and family counseling primarily through parent education groups and the open forum center approach. Students will have the opportunity to observe and practice the methods. Prerequisite: At least a bachelor's or master's degree in counseling, psychology, education, social work, administration, or business.

CNS547 Adlerian Clinical Counseling (2 crs.)

For counselors/therapists in practice or in training (at least at the internship level). Focus is on deepening the understanding of the four phases of the Adlerian therapy process and their application to the preferred population (children, adolescents, adults). Course is primarily practical and experiential. Prerequisite: A master's degree in a clinical field or substantial progress toward the degree.

CNS548 Using Adlerian Psychology in Consultation and Supervision (3 crs.)

Students will learn how to consult with parents and professionals, specifically, to teach them skills they can use with their children and clients. Additionally, students will learn supervisory skills to assist the professionals whom they supervise to overcome barriers that may inhibit them in their work. Prerequisite: At least a bachelor's or master's degree in counseling, psychology, education, social work, administration, or business.

CNS556 Guidance and Counseling Conference (1 cr.)

Concentrated one-week conference on a selected area of counseling and guidance. Recognized authorities in the field participate as lecturers and discussion leaders. In addition to participating in all aspects of the conference, students who are enrolled for credit attend an extra daily class session and complete an assignment related to the theme of the conference. A maximum of three semester hour credits earned in conferences may be applied toward meeting degree requirements.

CNS559 Introduction to the Helping Services (3 crs.)

Surveys a wide range of helping services and introduces the basic philosophical concepts underlying each, the principles by which such services operate, and the therapeutic practices which are characteristic of each service. Emphasis is on defining the helping relationship within each area and clarifying the ethical considerations which apply.

CNS560 Introduction to College Personnel Work (3 crs.)

Surveys basic principles and practices of student personnel work in higher education. Consideration is given to problems in residence hall management, counseling services, student activities, financial assistance, student government and other relevant topics that promote an appreciation of the conduct of student personnel services in higher education.

CNS562 Student Personnel Work in Higher Education (3 crs.)

Designed to provide the role concept for students in student personnel work at the college/university level. Designed to deal with specific issues and trends in the field; develop a design or operational model for program development, implementation, and evaluation; establish an operational role concept for specific student personnel positions. Prerequisites: Completion of Phase I, CNS560, and CNS565.

CNS563 Professional Orientation to Community Counseling (3 crs.)

Designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the rapidly evolving field of community counseling. Studies basic philosophy, principles, and current trends in the provision of community counseling services. Students gain understanding of topics such as: psychoeducational and developmental counseling, health-promotive services, indirect counseling services, crisis counseling, and ethical and legal issues.

CNS564 Grief and Loss Issues in Counseling (3 crs.)

Designed to help students identify, clarify the differences between grief, mourning, and bereavement and understand grief as a response to any loss, including death. Deals with the development of skills as a competent and caring counselor and helps to achieve a deeper self-understanding of the student's own feelings, attitudes, and values regarding loss and death. Prerequisite: Completion of Phase I or permission of instructor.

CNS565 The College Student and the College Environment (3 crs.)

Examines the impact of the college environment on both traditional and nontraditional students and provides in-depth understanding of the characteristics, attitudes, and developmental needs of those students. It also suggests methodology for identifying needs and assessing environmental characteristics. Prerequisite: CNS560.

CNS567 Counseling Children (3 crs.)

Intense study of basic theoretical foundations and approaches in counseling children, including play therapy. Childhood psychological disorders are surveyed using the current edition of the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Prerequisites: Completion of Phase I and CNS573.

CNS568 Professional Orientation to Mental Health Counseling (3 crs.)

Designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the rapidly evolving field of mental health counseling. Studies basic philosophy, principles and current trends in the provision of mental health counseling services. Students gain understanding of topics such as: treatment of psychopathology, diagnosis, direct counseling services, prevention and psychoeducational approaches, crisis counseling, and ethical and legal issues.

CNS570 Working with Dreams, Sandtrays and Music in Counseling (3 crs.)

Designed to acquaint students with the Hill cognitive-experiential model of dream work and the use of music and sandtray in counseling. This course includes a strong experiential component that provides students with an opportunity to practice various approaches for working with dreams and using music and sandtray in counseling. Prerequisite: CNS578: Pre-practicum in Counseling.

CNS573 Theories of Counseling (3 crs.)

Intensive study of basic concepts and theoretical foundations of counseling. Emphasis is on the student's ability to conceptualize client concerns, select appropriate counseling interventions, and apply the relevant theories to classroom simulations. Prerequisite: CNS559 or concurrent registration with permission of instructor.

CNS578 Pre-practicum in Counseling (3 crs.)

Designed as an introduction to the practicum. The student's interview technique is developed through micro-counseling, both videotaped and directly observed. The interview situation includes other members of the class and volunteer undergraduate students. Recognition of the proper use of the various types of responses (content, feeling, etc.) is stressed. Prerequisite: CNS559 or concurrent registration.

CNS580 Clinical Field Experience I (3 crs.)

The culminating experience for all programs, the field experience sequence consists of six (6) semester hours and is the internship requirement of the SU counseling programs. Students must complete 300 clock hours for each field experience in a professional setting appropriate to their career interests, skills, and program of study. Site selection must be approved by adviser. Course is offered on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: Completion of Phases I and II, adviser's approval, attendance at orientation meeting the prior semester, pre-registration form, and candidacy. CNS589 is required to satisfy the six credits for field placement.

CNS581 Counselor Supervision (3 crs.)

Provides experience in supervision of counselor trainees, including review of interview recordings; constructive critique of trainees, individually and in group settings; and reading and criticizing of written reports. Significant involvement with counselor trainees, if required, in order to experience a true supervisory and helping relationship. Prerequisites: Permission of the adviser and prior employment as a counselor. Note: Restricted to students enrolled in the Supervisory Certificate Program through Educational Administration and Foundations Department.

CNS585 Practicum in Counseling (3 crs.)

Field-based assignment in an agency, school, or institutional setting providing supervised professional experiences. Students must accumulate a minimum of 150 clock hours at a site appropriate to their program of study during one academic semester. Students must have a site approved by their adviser prior to course registration. Prerequisites: A grade of B or higher in CNS578, permission of adviser, attendance at orientation meeting the prior semester, and pre-registration form.

CNS586 Advanced Practicum in Counseling (3-6 crs.)

Extension of CNS585, permits student to gain greater specialized competencies in the same general setting. Prerequisites: CNS585, consent of adviser, attendance at orientation meeting the prior semester, and pre-registration form.

CNS587 Research Seminar in Counseling (3 crs.)

Presents the advanced student an opportunity to examine, evaluate, synthesize, and bring into final form previous learning and research to a consistent philosophical approach. Students are expected to address topics such as: race relations, women's concerns, counseling gay people, human sexuality, family counseling and/or other appropriate counseling concerns as addressed by recent research. Course is offered on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisite: CNS600.

CNS588 Advanced Psychotherapeutic Skills (3 crs.)

Designed to aid student in gaining experience and competency in the use of therapeutic interventions from a variety of theoretical modalities. Emphasis placed on understanding, experiencing, and applying each technique; the appropriateness of its application, its effect and side effects, and the theoretical concepts underlying the change process facilitated by the intervention. Prerequisites: Completion of Phase I and CNS573.

CNS589 Clinical Field Experience II (3 crs.)

Continuation of CNS580, Clinical Field Experience I, placement. Students must register for this course in order to satisfy the six (6) credit hour field experience requirement. Students must complete 300 clock hours for each field experience in a professional setting appropriate to their career interests, skills, and program of study. Site selection must be approved by adviser. Course offered on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: Completion of CNS580, approval of adviser, and pre-registration form.

CNS590 Advanced Clinical Field Experiences (3 crs.)

Continuation of the CNS580/589 field experience. Course offered on a pass/fail basis. Prerequisites: Completion of CNS580/589, adviser's approval, and pre-registration form. Site selection must be approved by adviser.

CNS593 Theories of Personality and their Implications for Counseling (3 crs.)

Acquaints counselors with the more prominent theories of normal personality development and supporting research evidence, with consideration given to the process of intervention and change within the counselee.

CNS596 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

CNS599 Independent Study (3-6 crs.)

Provides opportunities for students to pursue independent study designed to develop critical thinking and individual initiative through planned scholarly endeavor. The student, under the advisement of an assigned faculty member, engages in a study of a significant program not clearly a part of existing courses. Prerequisite: Permission of adviser.

CNS600 Research and Statistics (3 crs.)

Introduction to problems of structure and function of research in the counseling programs where attention is directed to the importance of individual differences, measurement of several variables, and the task of developmental understanding. Designed to develop competencies and explores empirical findings in both the production and consumption of current research. It considers experimental design, practical use of both descriptive and inferential statistics with application to measures of central tendency, variability, dispersion, correlation and tests of differences.

CNS609 Internship (3 crs.)

CNS612 Thesis I (3 crs.)

CNS613 Thesis II (3 crs.)

Criminal Justice (CRJ)

CRJ100 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 crs.)

General overview of the criminal justice system, including history, current role, developments and constitutional implications of law enforcement, describes the major agencies: police, prosecution, courts and corrections, and analyzes their interdependence.

CRJ211 Criminal Law and Procedure (3 crs.)

Comprehensive study of sources, distinctions and limitations relating to substantive and procedural criminal law; the development of the criminal law and procedure in the United States; the principles of criminal liability; the various crimes and their elements; the criteria considered in determining capacity and defenses. Emphasis on role of criminal justice personnel in the criminal law process as they perform their duties within the prescribed procedural framework. Prerequisite: CRJ100.

CRJ221 Policing a Democracy (3 crs.)

Surveys the major trends and issues in law enforcement, including the historical and contemporary development of the police role in society. Analyzes police behavior and attitudes affecting their relationship with the community they serve, as well as the legal framework within which they operate. Prerequisite: CRJ100.

CRJ241 Survey of Corrections (3 crs.)

Analyzes the development of correctional practices in the handling of criminals from early to modern times. Students analyze contemporary correctional organizational structures and treatment process, as well as institutional and community-based programs, practices, innovations, and problems. Prerequisite: CRJ100.

CRJ309 Theories of Crime and Crime Control (3 crs.)

Acquaints students with the different explanations of the origins of crime and society's ultimate reaction to it from antiquity to present. Provides a broad understanding of the relationship between theory and the behavior of criminal justice system agencies. Prerequisite: CRJ100.

CRJ310 Research Methods (3 crs.)

Introduction and overview to the evaluation of information concerning criminological and criminal/juvenile justice issues. Approaching these issues from a scientific perspective, such concerns as the theory/method interaction, measurement of criminal justice concepts, and methods in conducting criminal justice/criminological research are addressed from a consumer point of view. Prerequisite: CRJ100.

CRJ326 Victimology: The Victim and the Law (3 crs.)

Introduction to the study of the role of victims in the criminal justice system. Focus on defining victimization, treatment of victims in the criminal justice system, characteristics of victims, explanations of victimization, and policies and practices that have been directed towards victims. Prerequisite: Upper division status.

CRJ321 Criminal Investigation (3 crs.)

Introduction to criminal investigation, crime scene search and recording, collection and preservation of evidence, crime scene technology, modus operandi, sources of information, interviewing and interrogation, stages of investigation, and case preparation. Prerequisites: CRJ100, upper division status.

CRJ336 Introduction to Forensic Science (3 crs.)

Application of science to criminal investigation. Designed to familiarize students with the process of criminal investigation and the basic principles and uses of forensic science in the American justice system. Emphasis on reviewing the basic applications of biological, physical, chemical, medical, and behavioral sciences to questions of criminal investigation, evidence, and law. Prerequisite: Upper division status.

CRJ345 Organization & Management of CRJ Agenices (3 crs.)

Survey course on organization, administration, and management of criminal justice agencies. Topics covered pertain to the principles of management as they relate to the functions and activities of criminal justice agencies. While organizational structure is examined, emphasis on criminal justice operations and the contemporary theories of criminal justice management. Prerequisite: Upper division status.

CRJ348 Clinical, Intervention and Treatment (3 crs.)

Studies historical, philosophical, ideological, cultural, and institutional development of correctional treatment and rehabilitation practices for offenders. Students analyze various practical and theoretical correctional treatment and rehabilitation modalities within the criminal and juvenile justice systems.

CRJ351 Juvenile Justice (3 crs.)

Surveys the juvenile justice system of approaches and procedures concerning identification, detention, informal adjustment, adjudication, and disposition relevant to administration of justice policy, practice, and law.

CRJ356 Organized Crime (3 crs.)

Examines roots of organized crime and its transformation from a violence-driven regional and national set of illegal enterprises to an international and technologically sophisticated set of illegal enterprises. Role of technology in controlling organized crime will be examined, as will the global features of new organized crime groups as they emerge in a wide variety of countries. Social context of organized crime will be a consistent theme throughout. Prerequisite: Upper division status.

CRJ365 White Collar Crime (3 crs.)

Introduces the increasingly complex subject of crime committed by individuals whose legitimate employment provides them the opportunity for engaging in illegal activities. A variety of illegal activities will be examined as will white-collar scandals of the past and present. Relationship between the criminal justice system and white-collar crime will be thoroughly explored. Prerequisite: Upper division status.

CRJ370 Mock Trial (3 crs.)

Course in being a trial lawyer. Students will master the Federal Rules of Evidence (FRE) and apply them in a trial advocacy setting, either through the introduction of testimonial, documentary, or demonstrative evidence and/or by objecting to said admission of evidence. The student will perform all phases of a mock trial, from opening statements, direct, and cross-examinations (with objections), introducing evidence, jury instructions, and closing arguments. Last two weeks will be devoted to a full mock trial exercise. Prerequisite: Upper division status.

CRJ390 Selected Topics in Criminal Justice (3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

CRJ393 Selected Topics in Criminal Justice (3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

CRJ396 Selected Topics in Criminal Justice (3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

CRJ397 Selected Topics in Criminal Justice (3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

CRJ411 Terrorism (3 crs.)

To gain a basic appreciation for understanding the response of the criminal justice system to the terrorism problem. Includes types of terrorism, formation, leadership, location, motives and purposes, criminality, historical and contemporary issues and research, law enforcement, judicial and correctional efforts aimed at curtailing, controlling and understanding terrorism. Prerequisite: Upper division status.

CRJ433 Evidence Law (3 crs.)

Analyzes the law and public policies which guide the introduction of evidence in court. Primary emphasis on Federal Rules of Evidence and the manner of collecting and presenting evidence consistent with the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments to the United States Constitution. Students demonstrate evidentiary foundations through in-class practicum exercises and learn to introduce, by way of witness testimony, documents, scientific and real evidence, opinion and expert testimony resulting in a thorough understanding of the evidentiary concepts of burden of proof, probative value, competency, relevancy, materiality, the hearsay rule and its exclusions, and privileges. Prerequisite: Upper division status.

CRJ452 Race, Ethnicity, and Crime (3 crs.)

Acquaints students with issues regarding the role played by ethnicity/race in the American criminal justice system. A necessarily broad approach will be undertaken to achieve this goal. Will deal with three areas: the making of laws and minorities, the breaking of laws and minorities, and society's reaction to the breaking of laws and minorities. Provides a broad understanding of the philosophical and practical issues revolving around crime and minorities in American society.

CRJ454 Policy, Professionalism, and Ethics (3 crs.)

Assists in understanding critical issues confronting the police, courts, and corrections as criminal justice professionals. Focus on such issues as use of discretion in practitioner decision making; the impact of the law on criminal justice agency behavior; racial and gender issues; ethical issues and dilemmas; the impact of external influences on the operation of criminal justice agencies; the privatization of criminal justice services; and the future of the American criminal justice system. Provides a knowledge base from which criminal justice majors can either proceed to graduate courses or enter the field. Can be particularly useful if currently considering an internship or employment in a criminal justice agency. Prerequisite: Upper division status.

CRJ456 Forensic Science: Evidence Analysis (3 crs.)

Provides a continuation of CRJ336. Surveys various types of physical evidence commonly encountered at a crime scene and in a crime laboratory environment. Consists of lecture and laboratory exercises including crime processing, the identification and analysis of trace evidence including hairs and fibers, fingerprints, footwear evidence, shoe and tire impressions, and tool marks. Prerequisite: CRJ336 and upper division status.

CRJ461 Social Construction of Homicide (3 crs.)

Explores the nature of homicide in contemporary society and includes social theories of homicide, domestic murder, serial murder, infanticide, hate crimes, and youth gangs. Examination of the impact of drugs and alcohol and an assessment of capital punishment as a deterrent is included. Prerequisites: CRJ100 and completion of 200-level criminal justice courses.

CRJ463 Comparative Criminal Justice (3 crs.)

Provides a basic appreciation for understanding the historical, philosophical, ideological, and practical issues relevant to worldwide criminal justice systems. Prerequisite: Upper division status.

CRJ464 Popular Culture, Crime and Justice (3 crs.)

Examines the interrelationships between popular culture, crime, and justice. Explores history of this linkage, the research, and the current issues. Examines popular culture's depictions of victims, offenders, and professionals in the criminal justice system. Popular culture depictions are found in print media (newspapers, magazines and tabloids), popular literature (police and law procedures), true crime fiction, films, television, rap music, and comics. Impact of popular culture by various media is addressed through the presentation of historical and contemporary research images of crime on individuals, groups, and public policy. Prerequisite: Upper division status.

CRJ466 Women and Criminal Justice (3 crs.)

Presents contemporary issues and trends concerning women and their interactions with the criminal justice system. Major themes will be women as professionals; women as offenders; and women as victims. Each theme will be treated within the context of police, courts, and corrections.

CRJ471 Internship in Criminal Justice I

CRJ472 Internship in Criminal Justice II

CRJ473 Internship in Criminal Justice III

CRJ474 Internship in Criminal Justice IV (3 crs. each)

Offers a planned program of research, observation, study, and work in selected criminal justice agencies representing the major components of the system. Designed to supplement classroom study with constructive participation in the criminal justice system of communities, the United States, and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Prerequisite: Upper division status.

CRJ481 Independent Study in Criminal Justice (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to pursue in-depth study on a topic or issue of personal interest under the direction and guidance of a department faculty member. Prerequisite: Upper division status.

CRJ501 Foundations of Justice (3 crs.)

Examines the nature, application, and impact of various theoretical approaches, practices and assumptions regarding the function and operation of the criminal justice system.

CRJ520 Justice Administration and Management (3 crs.)

Studies bureaucracy and complex organizations with emphasis on the concepts and practices of the administration and management of agencies in the criminal justice system.

CRJ550 Graduate Seminar (3 crs.)

Introduces graduate students to the basic concepts, principles, and issues involved in the development of drug control policy in the United States since the early 1700s and the profound impact these factors have had on the public perception of drug use and the manner in which the criminal justice system functions.

CRJ560 Theories of Crime and Delinquency (3 crs.)

Examines etiology of criminal behavior including the process of becoming a criminal, patterns of criminal behavior, and social and individual consequences of crime and delinquency.

CRJ570 Legal Trends and Issues (3 crs.)

Explores in detail current trends and issues in law as they relate to the operation and management of the criminal and juvenile justice system.

CRJ580 Juvenile Justice System (3 crs.)

Examines the goals, organization, and operations of agencies and institutions that work with youthful offenders including current policies and proposals for their reform.

CRJ585 Treatment and Rehabilitation (3 crs.)

Examination and analysis of historical and contemporary correctional treatment and rehabilitation strategies, philosophies, ideologies, and developments relevant to correctional, organizational, and management policies and practices. Students critically focus on theoretical, practical and policy issues relating to treatment and rehabilitation programs provided to adult and juvenile offender populations.

CRJ590 Justice Policy Analysis (3 crs.)

Analysis of the process by which policy decisions in criminal justice are derived and implemented and their consequence on the criminal justice system.

CRJ593 Independent Study (3 crs.)

Opportunity for student to pursue in-depth study on a topic or issue of personal interest under the direction and guidance of a department faculty member. Prerequisite: CRJ600.

CRJ594 Selected Topics (3 crs.)

Opportunity for the department to offer courses in areas of major interests not covered by regular course offerings.

CRJ595 Practicum I (3 crs.)

An original work done as a group or individual effort in an agency setting which results in a scholarly paper revolving around an issue germane to the participating agency. Significant involvement with the agency is necessary. The department must approve the selection of the agency and the issue. Limited to "weekend" students.

CRJ597 Practicum II (3 crs.)

An original work done as a group or individual effort in an agency setting which results in a scholarly paper revolving around an issue germane to the participating agency. Significant involvement with the agency is necessary. The department must approve the selection of the agency and the issue. Limited to "weekend" students.

CRJ600 Research Methods (3 crs.)

Survey of empirical research methods and their application in the field of criminal justice; includes research design, theories of sampling, data collection strategies and analysis of findings.

CRJ610 Quantitative Analysis (3 crs.)

Examines the relationship and application of statistical techniques to theory building and concept construction. Includes an overview of statistical methods with an emphasis on criminal justice. Prerequisite: CRJ600.

CRJ612 Thesis I (3 crs.)

CRJ613 Thesis II (3 crs.)

CRJ617 Internship I (3 crs.)

Provides an opportunity to apply classroom (theoretical) learning in an agency setting; encourages the development of a professional identity and an appropriate set of professional skills and values; helps students identify or clarify their career interests; provides agencies with an opportunity to observe and evaluate potential staff; and provides students with the opportunity to conduct participant research in a justice agency. Student will encounter a variety of real world situations in which previously learned skills must be applied under the supervision of a practitioner. A full range of criminal justice agencies will be available for student selection.

CRJ618 Internship II (3 crs.)

Provides an opportunity to apply classroom (theoretical) learning in an agency setting; encourages the development of a professional identity and an appropriate set of professional skills and values; helps students identify or clarify their career interests; provides agencies with an opportunity to observe and evaluate potential staff; and provides students with the opportunity to conduct participant research in a justice agency. Student will encounter a variety of real world situations in which previously learned skills must be applied under the supervision of a practitioner. A full range of criminal justice agencies will be available for student selection.

CRJ635 Restorative Justice (3 crs.)

Examines the elements of the Restorative Justice Model and its application for criminal justice policy and practice. The restorative justice model features classical criminology, victimology, and cognitive therapy. Instructs students on three elements of the BARJ Model that includes community protection, youth accountability, and competency development.

 

 

Early Childhood (ECH)

ECH200 Introduction to Early Childhood (3 crs.)

Builds an understanding of the history, foundations, theory, organizational patterns, and instructional techniques of education for children ages two through eight. Observes schools organized in various ways and experiences diverse instructional strategies. Classroom participation is on a regular basis.

ECH330 Primary Curriculum (3 crs.)

Presents guidelines, strategies, and current, validated curricular models for planning and implementing developmentally appropriate educational programs for children in the primary grades (K-3). An integrated approach to curricular planning is emphasized, with focus given to areas of problem solving, expressive arts, and personal-social development. Activities include regularly scheduled observation and participation in a primary grade classroom. Prerequisite: ECH200.

ECH340 Preschool and Kindergarten Curriculum (3 crs.)

Presents guidelines for planning and implementing developmental curricula for preschool children. Includes cognitive and social domains of behavior. Approaches appropriate for children with special needs are included, as are strategies for parent involvement. Theoretical approaches which involve active learning, learning through play, experiences that build children's self esteem, developmental and individualized teaching/learning techniques, and behavior guidance through positive interactions are advocated.

ECH360 Assessment in Early Childhood and Early Intervention (3 crs.)

Acquaints students with guidelines for use of developmentally appropriate formal and informal assessments used in early childhood education and early intervention programs. Introduce commonly used standardized evaluation instruments as well as systems of authentic assessment. Field experiences are required. Should be taken with ECH 330. Prerequisite: TCH 160 and ECH 200.

ECH410 Physical, Motor, and Sensory Development in Early Childhood (3 crs.)

Examines physical, motor, and sensory development of typically and atypically developing young children, birth through age eight years. Child health and wellness concerns included. Developmental information applied to best practices in early childhood education and early intervention settings. Field experiences are required.

ECH460 Family School and Community Partnerships (3 crs.)

Surveys current and continuing issues in early childhood education. Includes child care, pre-primary programs and parent involvement, implementing a parent involvement project, and a individual study of a particular development area and/or processes. Prerequisite: A course in child development.

ECH462 Practicum in Early Childhood (3 crs.)

Supervised observation and participation in an early childhood (pre-primary) setting for at least 150 clock hours. Experiences in planning, implementing, and assessing education for young children and families are required.

ECH470 Language Development, Literacy, and Play in Early Childhood Education (3 crs.)

Preparation to understand the existing relationships among language development, early literacy development, and play behaviors in young children from birth through eight years. Application made to early childhood education and early intervention settings. Field experiences in an assigned practicum setting required. Prerequisites: TCH160, ECH200, ECH330, and senior status.

 

ECH510 Including Children with Special Needs in Early Childhood Education (3 crs.)

Presents current research about early childhood inclusion models and information about developing classroom-based services for young children with disabilities. Attention given to family-centered practice, collaboration with other disciplines, developmentally appropriate assessment, best practices for instruction, and preparing children for transition to new learning environments.

ECH520 Social and Emotional Development in Early Childhood (3 crs.)

Examines current research and theory about social and emotional development in young children, birth through eight years. Emphasis is on classroom practices, including instruction and discipline, which facilitate healthy social and emotional development in young children. Field experiences are required.

ECH530 Cognitive and Language Development in Early Childhood Education (3 crs.)

Examines current research and theory about cognitive and language development in young children, birth through eight years. Emphasis is on classroom practices, including instruction and discipline, which facilitate cognitive and language development in young children. Field experiences are required.

ECH540 Families and Early Childhood Education (3 crs.)

Examines theory and research from the area of family studies. Emphasis is on characteristics of families with young children and how early childhood practitioners can best apply this information in their work settings. Field assignments are required.

ECH563 Leadership in Early Childhood Education (3 crs.)

Designed to prepare personnel to function in the role of administrator of early childhood programs. Examines types of early childhood programs and their underlying rationales, ways of establishing early childhood programs, methods of funding and financing programs, and considers the coordinating role of the administrator in working with other personnel. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ECH577 Early Childhood Curriculum and Assessment (3 crs.)

Investigates contemporary curricular issues, model programs, and appropriate forms of assessment of young children. Curriculum, teaching strategies, and program organization and evaluation decisions are analyzed from the viewpoints of current theory and research

Earth Science (ESS)

ESS108 Conservation of Natural Resources (3 crs.)

Introduction to environmental conservation. Basic elements of the physical environment are examined in consideration of the interaction between physical and human landscape systems. Emphasis on fundamental relationship of society to agricultural, hydrologic, biotic, mineral, and energy resources. Factors of environmental quality and land use by society also considered.

ESS110 Introduction to Geology (3 crs.)

Examines and analyzes the geological processes and elements involved in the mobile earth, with emphasis on earth materials, external and internal processes, and earth history. Attention given to human interaction with the geological environment. Topographic maps, fossils, minerals and rocks are used to enhance understanding and student involvement. Lab/lecture.

ESS111 Introduction to the Atmosphere (3 crs.)

Examines and analyzes the interrelated processes and elements of our atmospheric environment, including air-sea interactions, which produce our patterns of weather and climate. Attention given to interaction of the environmental elements and people with emphasis on areas of pollution, atmospheric modification, political and legal aspects, and economic implications of the atmospheric environment. Maps, space and aerial photographs, and instruments are used to enhance understanding and involvement in environmental problems. Lab/lecture.

ESS207 Atmospheric Studies (3 crs.)

Provides basic information about the atmosphere, which students will apply to the understanding of selected atmospheric environmental topics; for example: air pollution, greenhouse warming, ozone, etc. Intended for Geography-Earth Science majors.

ESS210 Physical Geology (3 crs.)

Deals with basic principles of mineralogy, petrology, earth structures, and surficial processes. Comprehensive analysis of the Plate Tectonic Theory. Lab/lecture.

ESS212 Historical Geology (3 crs.)

Deals with origin and evolution of the geological and biological earth. Major areas include principles of historical geology, significance of sedimentary rocks, fossil records, and history of the Earth. Lab/lecture. Suggested prerequisite: ESS110 or ESS210.

ESS214 Geology of National Parks (3 crs.)

Presents broad overview and basic geology in limited detail of the North American continent and Hawaii, particularly as represented by the National Parks. Classroom discussion supplemented by demonstration/laboratory exercises with earth materials, models, maps, and stereo photos.

ESS220 Oceanography (3 crs.)

Comprehensive study of the ocean and surroundings. Main topics include origin of the ocean basins; water of the sea; physiography of the sea floor; plate tectonics; marine sediments; chemical properties of the sea; ocean circulation; waves, tides, beach, and shoreline processes; estuaries and life of the ocean. Prerequisite: ESS110 or ESS111 or CHM103 or permission of instructor.

ESS355 Meteorology (3 crs.)

Deals with atmosphere and stresses those forces which bring about changes within it. Insolation, temperature, precipitation, humidity, winds, storms, and cloudiness are the chief topics studied. Origin and development of cyclones and their significance in weather forecasting play an important interpretative part of this course. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week.

ESS393 Selected Topics in Earth Science (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

ESS404 Applied Meteorology and Climatology (3 crs.)

Intensive study of interaction between various atmospheric parameters and the natural or human-modified surfaces of the earth centered on the applied nature of the atmosphere including discussion of urban, human, agricultural, architectural, and commercial aspects of society. Computer simulations and mapping are utilized to enhance understanding. Each student carries out a field study on a particular problem of atmospheric interest. Prerequisite: ESS111 or ESS355.

ESS413 Mineral and Rock Resources (3 crs.)

Deals with metallic ore deposits such as iron, ferroalloys and nonferrous metals, mineral fuels, and other selected minerals of economic significance. Emphasis on geologic occurrence and mode of origin, geographical distribution, and importance to humans.

ESS442 Environmental Geology (3 crs.)

Deals with relationships between man and the geological habitat. Concerned with problems people have in using the earth and the reaction of the earth to that use in both a rural and urban setting. Stress placed on developing problem-solving skills in collecting, recording, and interpreting data through field investigations and simulation techniques. Prerequisite: ESS110.

ESS490 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

ESS594 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

ESS599 Independent Study (3 crs.)

Economics (ECO)

ECO101 Principles of Macroeconomics (3 crs.)

Introduction to aggregative economics. Provides some historical and institutional perspective on the U.S. and world economy, focus primarily upon contemporary theories of employment, inflation, and growth. Also examined are monetary and fiscal policy and foreign trade.

ECO102 Principles of Microeconomics (3 crs.)

Introduction to theory of price, including demand theory; the theory of the firm under purely competitive and imperfectly competitive market conditions; and the theory of income distribution. Application of theory to practical problems stressed.

ECO113 Principles of Economics (4 crs.)

Introduces fundamental concepts important for understanding how individuals and organizations function within an economy. Covering both microeconomic and macroeconomic principles, a wide array of both theoretical and applied issues are addressed as are how changing market conditions impact consumers and firms and how government policies influence the economy and business decisions. This course is not open to students who have completed either ECO101 and/or ECO102.

ECO270 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3 crs.)

Concerned with economic variables in the aggregate. Involves an analysis of national income accounting, the volume of output, income and employment, and the fine points of fiscal and monetary policy. Designed to aid students in advanced work in economics and especially to prepare them for graduate study. Prerequisite: ECO101 or permission of department.

ECO280 Managerial Economics (3 crs.)

Designed in the methods of applying economic concepts to solving business problems and gaining insight into the nature of business enterprises. Combined with statistics, economic principles are used to analyze decision-making within profit maximizing organizations. Alternative market structures and how they affect the business environment are considered. Based upon theoretical concepts and empirical research results, students can appreciate the applicability of analytical thinking within organizations. Prerequisites: ECO113 or ECO102 and Applied Calculus.

ECO305 Money and Banking (3 crs.)

Deals with monetary and banking principles and practices, credit, commercial banks and other financial institutions, and the Federal Reserve System. Prerequisite: ECO101 or permission of department.

ECO310 Public Finance (3 crs.)

Deals with theory and categories of public expenditures, principles and effects of taxation, major forms of taxes, theory and problems of government borrowing and deficit financing, fiscal policy, budgets, and fiscal administration. Prerequisites: ECO101 and ECO102 or permission of department.

ECO317 Health Economics (3 crs.)

Introduces the fundamental concepts of health care markets. Transactions among health care providers, insurance companies, government and patients will be examined. Basic tools of economics are introduced to analyze the behavior of consumers, hospitals, insurers, and health care professionals. Topics covered include the demand and supply of health care, health insurance, pharmaceutical industry, quality of care, access to care, competition, reform proposals, and government programs and regulation. Prerequisite: ECO102 or ECO113 or permission of department.

ECO321 International Economics (3 crs.)

Introduces basic theory of international trade and finance. Highlights sources of comparative advantage, gains and losses from trade, the impact of trade on economic growth, and effects of trade policy interventions such as tariffs, quotas, voluntary export restraints and export subsidies. International agreements on regional trade liberalization (such as EU and NAFTA) and on multilateral trade liberalization (e.g., WTO) will also be discussed. Topics on international finance include balance of payments, determination of foreign exchange rates, and international monetary system. Prerequisite: ECO102 or ECO113 or permission of department.

ECO325 Globalization: Issues and Policies (3 crs.)

Introduces numerous issues related to globalization and explores alternative ways of interpreting challenges and opportunities, as well as policy response options. Impact of globalization on both rich and poor nations, on skilled and unskilled workers, on farmers and non-farmers, etc., will be presented and discussed. While topical, course based upon both the theoretical and empirical literature. Prerequisite: ECO101 or ECO102 or ECO113.

ECO330 Development of Economic Thought (3 crs.)

Concerned with reading and critical discussion of writings of the classical economists, the pre-Marxian and Marxian Socialists, the Neo-Classical economists, the institutional economists, and important contributions to modern economic thought. Prerequisite: ECO101, ECO102 or permission of department.

ECO340 Introduction to Regional Economics (3 crs.)

Discusses the economics of industrial location, land utilization, urban structure, and regional development. Problems of locational change and adjustment are analyzed. Objectives, methods, and implications of policies of public control are emphasized. Prerequisite: ECO102 or permission of department.

ECO345 The Economics of Growth and Development (3 crs.)

Introduces the general field of economics growth and the problems of developing countries. Specifically, the nature of a typical underdeveloped area and the problems of capital formation, population growth, and economic organization are analyzed and compared with those arising with the growth of industrialized countries. Theories of economic growth and their relevance to current problems in developing areas and various forms of international assistance, are examined. Prerequisite: ECO102 or permission of department.

ECO355 Environmental Economics (3 crs.)

Focuses on environmental issues from both a microeconomic and macroeconomic point of view. Pollution control policies such as taxes, subsidies, marketable pollution permits, and government mandated pollution standards are analyzed from theoretical and applied perspectives.

ECO360 Industrial Organization (3 crs.)

Analyzes structure, conduct, and performance of American industry with emphasis on the economic and social impact of the concentration of economic power in the industrial sector. Prerequisite: ECO102 or permission of department.

ECO377 Sports Economics (3 crs.)

Tools of economic analysis are used to study the sports industry. Topics of discussion include monopoly, monopsony, pricing strategies, profitability, role of unions, discrimination, salary determination, and college athletics. The course is divided into three main sections: 1) the market structure of sports, 2) the financing of professional sports, and 3) the labor markets of professional and amateur sports. Prerequisite: ECO101 or ECO102 or ECO113.

ECO393 Selected Topics in Economics (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

ECO484 Mathematical Economics (3 crs.)

Covers the specification of economic models in mathematical terms. Applications of mathematical analysis to both macroeconomic and microeconomic concepts are presented. Prerequisites: ECO101 and ECO102 or ECO501; and MAT181 or MAT211 or MGS530.

ECO485 Econometrics (3 crs.)

Covers statistical estimation and testing of economic models. Topics include specification of models, data problems, and estimation problems encountered in the study of economics, such as serial correlation, hetroscedasticity, autoregression, lag models, and identification. Prerequisites: ECO101 and ECO102 or ECO501; and MGS226 or MGS531.

ECO490 Selected Topics (3 crs.)

 

ECO485 Econometrics (3 crs.)

Covers statistical estimation and testing of economic models. Topics include specification of models, data problems, and estimation problems encountered in the study of economics, such as serial correlation, hetroscedasticity, autoregression, lag models, and identification. Prerequisites: ECO101 and ECO102 or ECO501; and MGS226 or MGS531.

ECO490 Selected Topics (3 crs.)

 

Special Education/Education of Exceptional Children (ECC)

EEC411 Introduction to Exceptionality (3 crs.)

Provides a background in the field of special education and the nature of exceptionality in children and youth. Emphasis on societal attitudes and practices in relation to persons with exceptionalities, current practices in identifying and classifying children and youth with exceptionalities, characteristics of all exceptional population groups, programmatic needs of individuals with exceptionalities, and issues and trends in the various fields that impact on diagnosis, classification, and programming or service delivery. The knowledge base comes out of social, cognitive, and developmental psychology, medical aspects of exceptionality, educational law and policy, and special education.

EEC444 Formal/Informal Assessment of Individuals with Exceptionalities (3 crs.)

Introduces a learning systems model for the educational evaluation of exceptional children. Tests of intelligence, language development, academic achievement, gross and fine motor skill, and social and emotional development are studied along with other data gathering techniques such as anecdotal records, behavior checklists, and parent interviews. Emphasis given to identification of those learning and behavior correlates essential in generating prescriptive programs for exceptional children. Class presentation includes lecture, discussion, films, demonstrations on video tape, and actual experience in administering and scoring selected tests. Prerequisite: EEC411 and EEC475 or permission of the instructor.

EEC445 Proactive Approaches for Classroom and Behavior Management (3 crs.)

Provides instruction and experience in individual and group aspects of classroom management. Provides instruction on proactive versus reactive interventions, defining and prioritizing behaviors, collecting and interpreting observational data, and methods for increasing desirable behaviors and decreasing undesirable behaviors. Discusses generalization and maintenance of behaviors, and self-management. Writing effective behavior management plans emphasized while focusing on ethical, legal, and proactive practices. Prerequisite: EEC411, EEC475 or permission of the instructor.

EEC447 Instructional Content and Practices for Special Education (3 crs.)

Advanced study of problems of curricular development including models, content, vehicles of implementation, and evaluation aspects. Students will work to develop curricular solutions to professional and situational needs. Includes the development of Individualized Education Programs (IEPs), working with supervisors, and instructional strategies for teaching academics, social, vocational, and leisure skills. Prerequisite: EEC411 or permission of instructor.

EEC474 Educational Needs of the Gifted Child (3 crs.)

Examines characteristics and needs of gifted and talented students through reading and discussion of case studies and the literature. Nature of desirable individual and group activities satisfying to gifted students is explored for use in the school program.

EEC475 Inclusive Education: A Practical Approach for Educators (3 crs.)

Designed to prepare both general and special education teachers to effectively teach students with disabilities in general education settings. Practical guidelines, strategies, methods, adaptations, and materials, including definition, standards, classroom organization/management, and collaborative consultation emphasized to meet the academic, social, and affective needs of students with disabilities in inclusive settings. Prerequisite: EEC 411 or permission of instructor.

EEC490 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

EEC513 Medical and Psychological Aspects of Disability (3 crs.)

Considers physiological and related factors affecting learning and behavior. Medical considerations related to causations and remediation are stressed. Study of physiological, neurological, and psychiatric aspects of the learning and behavior patterns of individuals with exceptionalities are made. Prerequisite: EEC411.

EEC543 Selected Studies in Special Education (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity for qualified students to pursue selected studies in areas of special interest such as preparation and development of new curriculum materials, investigations leading to a greater knowledge of procedures for teaching, and the survey and analysis of current practices in the organization and the curriculum of the special education program. Prerequisites: Six graduate credits in special education and approval of department chair.

EEC546 Vocational Education of Individuals with Disabilities (3 crs.)

Information about the pre-vocational and vocational training of adolescents and young adults who have mental retardation, learning disabilities, or behavior disorders. Provides an understanding of curriculum developments, methods, materials and teaching techniques utilized in the development of skills and attitudes essential to success in the world of work.

EEC548 Direct Instruction (3 crs.)

This class will cover carefully sequenced, highly-prescriptive teacher directed procedures for teaching decoding, comprehension, content, and study skills. Rather than merely "list" ways to teach skills, direct instruction method discusses when a skill should be taught, what examples to teach, how to correct errors, and the relationship among different reading skills. Prerequisite: EEC411 or permission of instructor.

EEC551 Programming and Instruction for Individuals with Learning Disabilities (4 crs.)

Subject matter in reading, writing, spelling, math, and social skills at the elementary and secondary levels is discussed for students who have learning disabilities. Diagnostic results are utilized in developing appropriate remedial methods, activities, and IEPs. Helps students become critical thinkers, creative planners, and effective practitioners. New topics and areas included as noted in research literature. Method of presentation is basically lecture and discussion. Prerequisite: EEC411, EEC550.

EEC552 Language Disorders in Individuals with Learning Disabilities (3 crs.)

Study of children's language development as a basis for intensive study of language disorders in the individual with learning disabilities, disorders of oral language and usage, diagnosis and remediation of the disorder. Emphasis on the interrelationships among oral language, reading and written language disorders. Class presentations include lecture, discussion, and videotape demonstrations. Students gain experience in doing language analysis and developing remediation strategies to be integrated in the overall remediation plan of the student. Prerequisite: EEC550.

EEC561 Programming and Instruction for Individuals with Mental Retardation/Developmental Disabilities (4 crs.)

Study of educational strategies and materials for use with students who have moderate to pro-found levels of impairment in intellectual functioning. Adaptation of instructional strategies and materials to meet unique needs of the students when necessary is also stressed. Education for independent functioning in self-care skills, social skills, and daily living skills is emphasized. Prerequisites: EEC411, EEC560.

EEC562 Programming and Instruction for Individuals with Severe and Profound Mental Retardation (3 crs.)

Studies educational processes of students with severe and profound mental retardation. Course provides understanding of curriculum development, methods, materials, and special teaching techniques and strategies as applied in both public school and institutional settings. Major emphasis on programming for self-help and social skill development. Prerequisite: EEC560.

EEC571 Programming and Instruction for Individuals with Behavior Disorders (4 crs.)

This methods course focuses on development of appropriate curriculum and strategies based on individual needs, practical application and methods, and assessment. Students have a field experience working with students with behavior disorders, their teachers and/or their families at the elementary, middle, secondary level and/or in alternative settings. Specific emphasis placed on what educators can do to promote learning for students with behavior disorders including initial planning and organization, assessment, selection and modification of curriculum, communication with others, and positive behavior management programs with an emphasis on teaching social skills and appropriate curriculum as an integrated strategy using current and best practices. Prerequisite: EEC570.

EEC572 Counseling and Group Process for Children with Behavior Disorders (3 crs.)

Explores strategies and procedures for individual and group counseling, role playing, and discussion groups. These techniques are built on understanding of group processes and basic theories of counseling as they relate to educational programming for children with behavior disorders. Prerequisite: EEC411 or EEC570.

EEC590 Practicum I in Special Education (3 crs.)

Designed to extend student's professional preparation beyond resources of the college to include resources of the community and region. Practicum is intended to permit graduate student to engage in supervised professional activities in selected cooperating community agencies, local education agencies, or intermediate units. Prerequisites: EEC544, EEC545, EEC551, EEC561, EEC571.

EEC591 Practicum II in Special Education (3 crs.)

Supervised intensive field experience designed to provide the candidate for certification in special education with field experiences in assessment techniques, special class operation, participating in child study teams, and curriculum development. Prerequisite: EEC590.

EEC592 Clinical Assessment of Individuals with Exceptionalities (3 crs.)

Provides an intensively supervised experience in individual assessment of individuals with exceptionalities. Students work in small teams with a faculty member and are responsible for a complete educational assessment of selected children. Each individual team member gains experience in both parent and teacher interviewing, test administration and interpretation, team staffings, report writing and summary interpretation conferences with both student and his/her parents. Offered only during summer session. Prerequisite: Permission of adviser.

EEC594 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

EEC599 Independent Study (3 crs.)

EEC609 Internship (3 crs.)

Education (EDU)

EDU371 Technology in the Mathematics Classroom (3 crs.)

Surveys the broad spectrum of technology as an effective means for achieving educational objectives in the secondary mathematics classroom. Emphasizes graphing calculators, computer spreadsheets, various software programs, digital technology, etc. Includes extensive laboratory-based hands-on learning. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EDU393 Selected Topics in Educational Foundations (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

EDU410 Environmental Education Practicum (3 crs.)

Opportunity to apply knowledge gained in previous courses and other experiences to a practical situation. Includes activities specifically designed to develop and evaluate skills needed to create a course of study for teaching environmental education in the elementary and secondary schools. An integral part is working with both elementary and secondary students in the application of both skills and knowledge. Prerequisite: Approval of coordinator of environmental education.

EDU412 Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Schools I (3 crs.)

Designed to acquaint the prospective teacher of social studies with the philosophy of the field, curriculum preparation and materials, and recent methods and techniques. Course outline, preparation of teaching units, testing and visual aids are stressed.

EDU413 Teaching of Social Studies II (3 crs.)

Explores the rationale for media use in education, provides an opportunity to develop audiovisual materials and become familiar with commercial materials to supplement teaching techniques and hands-on experiences with a variety of media equipment. Incorporates techniques of evaluation and testing through presentations and projects, which enhance student decision making to include these elements in classroom instructions. Course must be taken concurrently with EDU412.

EDU420 Microcomputers in the Classroom (3 crs.)

Provides basic knowledge of evolution and operation of a microcomputer system. A variety of educational applications are reviewed and analyzed for instructional contributions. Using recommended evaluation procedures, software reviewed and discussed as to classroom utilization.

EDU421 Teaching of English in Secondary Schools (3 crs.)

Review of language arts requirements of secondary schools with special reference to grade placement and adaptation of materials, appraisal of results and the development of programs of study. Directed observation in the laboratory school is frequently employed.

EDU426 Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages (3 crs.)

Focuses on techniques and materials for teaching foreign languages in the K-12 school setting. Theoretical rationales for a variety of methodologies and specific techniques examined along with the implications of findings from research in second language acquisition. Through a variety of strategies and experiences students develop those skills needed to begin a successful teaching career. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EDU429 Methods of Teaching Business Subjects I (3 crs.)

Focuses on skills and knowledge needed by pre-service teachers as they learn to design instructional programs in the areas of business and computer education. Particular focus is on identification and selection of appropriate curriculum materials, methods of presenting information to diverse groups of students, and the educational technology which supports the instructional program. Classroom management techniques, curriculum considerations, and strategies for teaching business subjects are stressed. Must be taken concurrently with EDU431.

EDU431 Methods of Teaching Business Subjects II (3 crs.)

Focuses on topics of educational and psychological measurement and evaluation and their use by classroom teachers, curriculum supervisors, school system administrators, and educational researchers. Evaluation of student progress in a variety of educational settings is addressed. Case studies focusing on various aspects of teaching provide an opportunity for reflection on all aspects of classroom instruction. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 429.

EDU434 Teaching of Mathematics in the Middle Grades and High School I (3 crs.)

Covers theories of learning mathematics, national and state standards, and educational issues related to teaching and learning mathematics. Mathematical content and curricula for middle school and high school students will be explored and analyzed. Lesson and long-range planning and the classroom environment are included. Taken concurrently with EDU435.

EDU435 Teaching of Mathematics in the Middle Grades and High School II (3 crs.)

Covers instructional and assessment strategies for middle school and high school mathematics classrooms. Differentiated instruction techniques, the use of student-centered approaches, and reading and writing connections are included. Students will participate in pre-student teaching clinical experiences. Taken concurrently with EDU434.

EDU440 Teaching of Science in Secondary Schools (3 crs.)

Students develop an instructional philosophy through discussions and reading as well as experience in simulated teaching activities. Use of demonstrations, experiments, visual aids, projects, cooperative learning, and other inquiry and discovery activities are stressed. Additional topics include individual differences among students, handicapped, or reading disabled. Must be taken concurrently with EDU441.

EDU441 Curriculum and Evaluation in the Secondary Science Classroom (3 crs.)

Understanding of inter-relatedness between the life science, physical science, chemistry, and earth and space science curricula through reading, demonstrations, and visits to schools. Emphasis on relationships among learning objectives, teaching/learning activities, and the attainment of those objectives. Evaluation component includes construction of classroom rubrics, quizzes and tests, and the analysis and improvement of those assessment tools. Must be taken concurrently with EDU440.

EDU495 Student Teaching and Professional Practicum (15 crs.)

Professional site-based experience provides a full semester of guided teaching in the K-12 schools during which the student, under the direction of a qualified cooperating teacher and university supervisor, takes increasing responsibility for planning and directing the learning experience of a specific group(s) of students.

 

EDU501 Mathematics Curricula in the Secondary School (3 crs.)

Study of wide range of mathematics curricula, including those developed for the non-college intending as well as for the college intending. General curriculum problems and relevant research is studied. Implications for curriculum of national standards for school mathematics and the role of technology will be considered.

EDU502 Strategies and Tactics in Teaching Mathematics (3 crs.)

Utilizes the reflective model in solving pedagogical problems which arise in mathematics classes, participants solve their own problem(s) using resources such as the library, other students, and the instructor. Attention is given to innovative techniques in mathematics education, the role of technology, and problem-solving processes. A core of teaching techniques consistent with national standards for school mathematics are studied.

Educational Leadership and Policy (ELP)

ELP490 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

ELP500 General School Administration (3 crs.)

Introductory study of the organization and administration of American public education for persons interested in pursuing a professional career in educational administration. A basic understanding of educational leadership is developed through an integration of theory, knowledge, and actual practice. Course is designed for teachers, school board members, and other interested lay citizens who wish to know more about educational administration.

ELP501 Curriculum for School Leaders (K-12) (3 crs.)

Addresses the changing curriculum in the American public schools (grades K-12). Topics include the history and status of recent curriculum projects with the controversy, problems, and issues involved. Designed for specialists and generalists in education, particularly principals, counseling personnel, and subject area specialists. These individuals must be knowledgeable about curricular goals and activities in order to perceive interrelationships among various disciplines, evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum, and to direct meaningful programs of curricular improvement. Through course experiences, graduate students will be knowledgeable about innovations, strategic planning, issues, trends, federal and state regulations in order to exert leadership in articulating curricular reform to school boards, parents, and professional staff members. Prerequisite: Teaching and/or counseling experience, or permission of adviser.

ELP503 Educational Foundations: Contemporary Issues (3 crs.)

Comprehensive and contemporary offering designed to explore the connections among the present-day complexities of schools and the historical, philosophical, and sociological backgrounds from which they emerged. In addition, examines the reform and restructuring agendas of the past two decades, critically exploring proposed solutions to the most pressing educational problems facing society in the 21st century.

ELP505 Computers and the School Administrator (3 crs.)

Provides a review of different levels of computer literacy, the administrator's role in development of staff literacy and making knowledgeable decisions about board policies regarding acquisition and utilization of computers. Activities require students to implement, via commercial application programs, computerization of various administrative responsibilities such as scheduling, budgeting, record reporting, files, attendance, etc. Hands-on experiences with these packages provided.

ELP506-507 Instructional Supervision: A School-University Partnership (2 crs. each)

Enables in-service teachers to consistently and effectively develop their supervisory skills for working closely as cooperating teachers with student teachers from Shippensburg University, as mentors assisting novices entering the profession, and as peer coaches collaborating with one another for professional development. Prerequisites: Teacher certification and a minimum of two years of teaching.

ELP508 Graduate Seminar in Instructional Strategies (3 crs.)

Comprehensive study and systematic examination of classroom instructional strategies. It is designed to involve teachers in the process of analyzing and improving the effectiveness of their methods. Teachers develop and cultivate alternative instructional strategies on the basis of their analyses through the utilization of various instruments and programs, complemented by the process of microteaching.

ELP510 Special Education Law (3 crs.)

Provides a comprehensive and current overview of the major federal laws and judicial interpretations of those laws that apply to the education of children with disabilities. Course includes discussions of inclusion, effective accommodations, IEPs, discipline, equal protection, and procedural due process. It also examines the six principles of the Individuals with Disabilities Act and Chapters 14, 15, and 16 of the Pennsylvania School Code. Course helps students understand what the law requires so that they will become effective educational leaders capable of making appropriate decisions that comply with these laws.

ELP511 Philosophical Foundations of Education (3 crs.)

Survey of major European and American philosophies which have influenced education and outstanding philosophy schools which have affected education in relationship to changing patterns of American schools with respect to procedures and curricular materials.

ELP512 The Curriculum in the Modern Secondary School (3 crs.)

Deals with the changing curriculum of the American secondary school. Topics include the history and status of new curriculum projects with the controversy, problems, and issues involved.

ELP513 Sociological Foundations of Education (3 crs.)

Attempts an analysis and understanding of social factors in the socialization of the individual and the process of education. Begins with the context of culture and studies the structure and functioning of the social system in those areas which particularly seem to impinge upon the specialization process and which particularly affect the school and the child. Considers the institutions which are of fundamental importance in socialization and education. Makes use of significant sociological data and principles which are applicable to educational practice and are indicative of what educational policies and practices might be.

ELP530 The Instructional Leader in the Middle School (3 crs.)

Comprehensive study and systematic examination of educational programs designed to pro- vide a transition between elementary school and secondary education. Special emphasis on the role of the middle school instructional leader in the following areas: (1) specific competencies in the unique physiological, psychological, socio-logical, and emotional characteristics of pre- and early adolescent children; (2) specific competencies in the development of appropriate curriculum and instructional programs designed to meet the needs of pre- and early adolescent children; (3) specific administrative and supervisory competencies in working with teachers, staff, community support personnel, and parents in the operation of educational programs for pre- and early adolescent children; and (4) specific competencies in research relative to existing junior high school/middle school educational programs in Pennsylvania and the nation.

ELP545 The Principalship (3 crs.)

Introduces the future administrator to the principles and practices of administration as these relate to individual school units and the principal's function as an educator, professional leader, supervisor, master planner, business executive, community relations agent, and educational diagnostician. Focuses on experiences which relate the theory presented in class to simulated situations a principal may (and likely will) encounter. Prerequisite: master's degree in educational administration or permission of student's adviser and student's instructor.

ELP569 Seminar: Diversity in Education (3 crs.)

Increases the awareness of administrators, educators, and related school personnel to the problems, challenges, and issues faced by various cultural minority students as they strive to become incorporated in their respective schools within the mainstream of American society. Stresses the various strategies, methods, and techniques educators need to know to write and execute administrative policies and practices and to design and implement curriculum and teaching strategies that reflect the ethnic diversity and cultural minorities found within their respective buildings and school districts. Emphasis placed on the Black and Hispanic populations.

ELP574 Finance and the School Principal (3 crs.)

Designed to provide future and practicing elementary and secondary level building administrators with the knowledge necessary to understand and manage the fiscal responsibilities of an administrator working at the building level. As site-based management becomes a reality in schools, building level administrators face greater responsibility and accountability in this area. Covers the practical aspects of budget development, accounting procedures, building level fiscal policies, activities fund and athletics fund management, purchasing procedures, computer techniques to manage fiscal affairs, and management approaches such as site-based management and total quality management as it applies to building level fiscal administration. Field-based experiences involving interaction with practicing administrators will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: ELP500 and ELP505.

ELP580 Statistical Methods in Education (3 crs.)

Designed to enable the student to interpret the scientific literature in education and psychology and to make the computations involved in the use of tests and original investigations that require statistical technique. Measures of central tendency, variability, and correlations are included.

ELP591 School Law (3 crs.)

Studies the major areas of school law with particular emphasis on the school code of Pennsylvania. Deals with such topics as: tort liability of school officials and teachers, the legal structure of public education, control of pupil conduct, desegregation, church-state relations and education, teachers' rights and responsibilities, pupils' rights, professional negotiations, the courts and the curriculum and the uses of school property and money. Prerequisites: ELP500 and ELP592.

ELP592 General School Supervision (3 crs.)

Designed for principals, supervisors, department chairs and/or future cooperating teachers. Main thrust is to develop those supervisory concepts and skills necessary to evaluate the instructional act and to implement remedial activities. Majority of class meetings are work sessions where future supervisors view video tapes of the instructional act which serve as a point of reference for writing critiques, group discussions, and simulated supervisor-teacher conferences.

ELP594 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

ELP597 Practicum in Educational Administration (3 crs.)

Provides experiences designed to develop and enhance the overall effectiveness of the would-be administrators' competencies. Practicum is an individually prescribed program based upon the stated competencies of the program and the past experiences of the student. It consists of planned experiences and emphasizes direct involvement in school administration at sites mutually acceptable to the student and the adviser of the practicum experience. The practicum experience provides the student with opportunities to bridge the gap between theory and practice and to realize first-hand involvement in the administration of schools. Prerequisites: ELP500, ELP592, ELP501, and ELP545.

ELP598 Advanced Practicum in Educational Administration (3 crs.)

Extends the planned administrative experiences in a school setting. Student is required to serve a portion of the practicum in more than one district in order to assure a wide range of practicum experiences. Prerequisites: ELP597, ELP591, and ELP545.

ELP600 Research for School Administrators (3 crs.)

Stresses research designs and methods, the terminology of research, the use of centers for research collection and dissemination for school administrators and emphasizes skills in designing and evaluating research studies. Prerequisite: ELP580.

ELP601-604 Practicum in Central Office Administration (3-6 crs.)

Designed to bridge the gap from theory to practice. Student becomes directly involved in the operation of the central office and will perform the functions and duties of central office personnel completing several projects throughout the field experience. A synopsis of experiences is shared in a seminar approach with the university adviser and other practicum students. College adviser performs periodic on-site visits to assess the growth and development of the intern. Prerequisites: ELP612 and ELP614.

ELP611 The Legal Aspects of Public School Administration (3 crs.)

Will identify, assess, and appraise the nature and function of the law and legal process as it impacts and applies to the administration of school districts and schools. Topics provide an in-depth examination of legal issues associated with the central administrative office and specifically with the position of superintendent of schools. Emphasis on a pragmatic approach of administrative survival in an increasingly litigious society. Prerequisite: ELP591 or approval of department chair.

ELP612 Educational Leadership, Policy and Governance (3 crs.)

Examines the theories of leadership and organization and their application to administrative practices. Sociological, psychological, and organizational models will be described and analyzed to gain insight into administrative practices and processes such as decision making, group motivation, goal setting, delegating, conflict resolution, and site-based management. Extensive research of current practices will be required. Additionally, course has been designed to target current issues and problematic situations facing the central office administrator in today's dynamic system of public education.

ELP613 Educational Facilities and Plant Management (3 crs.)

Designed for students in the Superintendent's Letter of Eligibility Program and for practicing educational administrators who want to update skills in educational facilities and plant management. Relates educational program to facilities planning and development; provides an opportunity for students to interact with professionals from a variety of disciplines related to planning and development of educational facilities, relates local planning to Pennsylvania Department of Education requirements and regulations; and provides field-based work in contemporary facility planning, development, and maintenance. Prerequisites: Admission to the Superintendent's Letter of Eligibility program or ELP500, ELP501, ELP545, and ELP591.

ELP614 Business and Finance in Public Education (3 crs.)

Identify and assess methods of financing public education. Addresses the complex business processes of educational planning and financing for staff, instructional process, and physical plant. Included for examination are: a historical review of school finance; public education's funding sources, including a study of federal and state financing; the nature of taxing authorities; the subsidy system; grants and entitlements to public education; and future trends and options in creative financial planning. The business operation of the public school is examined. An in-depth investigation of budget preparation, long-and short-term investing, bonding and underwriting, tax collecting, and construction planning will be addressed. Prerequisite: ELP500.

ELP615 School and Community Relations (3 crs.)

Viewing the school as a dynamic cultural entity interacting with external supra-systems, the graduate student assesses the school's interdependency on the community and its many publics. Importance of a sound public relations program for the school, and need to communicate and understand the community is stressed. The student designs a program to enhance effective lines of communication between the school and its publics.

ELP616 Negotiations and Personnel Management in Public Education (3 crs.)

Designed to provide a comprehensive overview of personnel theory and function from the perspective of central office administration. Topics and issues explored include an in-depth treatment of contract negotiations, grievance procedures, mediation and arbitration for both classified and professional employees. Theories and practices in staff recruitment, selection, assignment, orientation, evaluation, educational development, and retrenchment are examined. Personnel management theory is viewed from a holistic approach. Prerequisites: ELP500 and ELP545.

ELP618 Curriculum Theory and Development (3 crs.)

Designed for administrators who are/will be leaders in the curriculum area, and viewed from the macro-curriculum perspective instead of the micro-curriculum perspective. Philosophies of education and their influences on basic education are studied. Current and recent trends in education are analyzed and compared to basic educational philosophies. Major thrust is management, development, and evaluation of the total curriculum. Recent research on change and effective schools examined and students encouraged to develop a rationale for administrative action. Roles of supervisors, principals, and central office personnel examined as they relate to curriculum management, development, and evaluation.

ELP619 Leadership for Pupil Services (3 crs.)

Designed for students in administrator certification programs who want to develop skills necessary to provide leadership for pupil services programs in school organizations. Areas of focus include: organization and development of pupil services; team approaches for meeting individual student needs in inclusive learning environments; underlying assumptions of pupil services programs; supervision and staffing; financing; and crisis prevention and response management. Attention will be given to roles of building principals and central office staff in pupil services programs. Community support systems will be addressed with regard to the manner in which they provide assistance to and interact with students, parents, and schools (e.g., juvenile justice, public health, mental health, social services, employers).

ELP620 Thesis (3 crs.)

Elective course offered within the master's program in elementary/middle or middle/secondary administration. Students enrolled in ELP600 Research for School Administrators select a committee, a chair, and complete the proposal (the first three chapters of the thesis), including human subjects review. During ELP620 Thesis, student defends the proposal begun in ELP600, gathers data, completes the writing of the thesis, and defends completed thesis. For students with an interest in research and those who expect to pursue a doctorate.

English (ENG)

ENG050 Basic Writing (3 crs.)

Offers development of skills necessary for writing effectively. Includes instruction in pre-writing, writing, revising, editing, and proofreading. In addition to assignments on vocabulary, sentence structure, mechanics, and usage, students will work on writing effective paragraphs and compositions. A documented essay is the final project. Required of students who exhibit need of preparation for ENG101 or ENG106.

ENG101 College Writing (3 crs.)

Offers instruction in writing effective essays in accordance with a process model of pre-writing (including assigned readings and collecting materials for writing), drafting, peer reviewing, revising, editing, and proofreading. Students compose some writing from print, non-print, and on-line sources, using such appropriate documentation formats as the Modern Language Association (MLA) format for essays in the humanities. Students assigned to ENG101 on the basis of their performance on the SAT or after successful completion of ENG050.

ENG106 Writing Intensive First-Year Seminar (3 crs.)

Introduces thought provoking texts and subjects. Assists students in developing four basic skills: writing, reading, discussion, and critical-thinking. Students learn to communicate more effectively as writers and learn to read, discuss, and think more deeply and successfully. Introduces some university resources, such as the library and the Learning Center. Assists in making the transition from high school to the university by providing a small, interactive writing intensive course. Students are assigned to ENG106 on the basis of their performance on the SAT or after successful completion of ENG050.

ENG107 Introduction to Literary Studies (3 crs.)

Introduces the fundamental components of the major genres of literature (drama, fiction, poetry): plot-structure and character, narrative point-of-view and style, metaphor, and rhythm. Students are taught to identify and to evaluate these components in a range of representative titles, e.g., Sophocles' Oedipus cycle, Toni Morrison's Sula, Coleridge and Wordsworth's Lyrical Ballads. Includes reading and writing assignments focused on such identification and evaluation. Expect to do at least one documented paper. This course is a prerequisite for all 300- and 400-level English courses.

ENG110 Advanced Placement Writing (3 crs.)

Provides well-prepared students with enhanced course work in writing effective essays in accordance with a process model of pre-writing, drafting, peer reviewing, revising, editing, and proofreading, as well as sophisticated rhetorical analysis of audience, form, and content. Students compose some writing from print, non-print and on-line sources, using such appropriate documentation formats as Modern Language Association (MLA) format for essays in the humanities. Students are assigned to ENG110 instead of ENG101 or ENG106 on the basis of their performance on the SAT.

ENG111 Introduction to Literary Studies II: Advanced Critical Analysis (3 crs.)

Introduces the fundamentals of the writing and research process as well as critical approaches to writing in the English major. These critical approaches may include New Historicism, feminist criticism, queer theory, deconstruction, Marxism, cultural studies, postcolonial theory, and reader-response criticism. Students are taught how to write and workshop a critically informed literary analysis involving both primary and secondary texts and using standard practices in the discipline (accessing authoritative criticism, cultural, and/or historical information using specialized research tools, and cultivating an ability to apply critical perspectives in a way that will serve them well in diverse content areas and classroom settings). Course work includes reading and writing assignments that develop writing skills and original, critically informed analyses. Students will complete at least 20 pages of writing. This course is a prerequisite for all 300- and 400- level English courses.

 

ENG190 Gen Ed SPC Topics (3 crs. )

This is a course for any student across the disciplines who might be interested in Creative Writing. Its approach to literature will be from the writer’s perspective, with its primary focus on craft, technique and production of literary devices.  We will examine the basic tools of language (metaphor, image, narrative, point of view, dialogue, tone) across the genres: in poetry, fiction, essays, plays, and some more contemporary multi-genre forms.  Assignments will be pulled from both the critical and creative spectrums, and readings and discussions will be rigorous and lively. 

ENG233 American Literature I (1650-1865) (3 crs.)

First of a two-part chronologically based survey of American literature. Works of drama, fiction, and poetry by American writers of this period are studied. Representative writers are Taylor, Melville, Dickinson, and Whitman. Some attention given to history of ideas associated with the writers of this period. Expect to write at least one analytic paper dealing with one or more of the works read for the course.

ENG234 American Literature II (1865-1945) (3 crs.)

Second of a two-part chronologically based survey of American literature. Works of drama, fiction, and poetry by American writers of this period are studied. Representative writers are James, Wharton, O'Neill, and Stevens. Some attention given to the history of ideas associated with the writers of this period. Expect to write at least one analytic paper dealing with one or more of the works read for the course.

ENG236 British Literature I (700-1798) (3 crs.)

First of a two-part, chronologically based survey of British literature. Works of drama, prose, and poetry by British writers of this period are studied. Representative writers include Chaucer, Jonson, and Milton. Some attention given to history of ideas associated with the writers of this period. Expect to write at least one analytic paper dealing with one or more of the works read for the course.

ENG237 British Literature II (1798-1945) (3 crs.)

Second of a two-part, chronologically based survey of British literature. Works of drama, prose, and poetry by British writers of this period are studied. Representative writers are Wordsworth, Browning, Yeats, and Joyce. Some attention given to history of ideas associated with the writers of this period. Expect to write at least one analytic paper for the course.

ENG238 Technical/Professional Writing I (3 crs.)

Introduces the process, techniques, and forms of technical writing. Students follow a writing process from research through drafting to editing for clarity and effectiveness. Includes using graphics to convey information, accurately documenting electronic and on-line sources, and carefully considering audience. Assignments cover basic forms of technical communication such as memos, letters, resumes, instructions, abstracts, and presentations. A major research project in the disciplines gives students experience with the specific forms of technical or professional writing required in their academic area.

ENG240 World Literature (3 crs.)

Offers a survey of literatures in global and historical contexts. Readings will focus on literatures produced outside England and the U.S. Over half of the texts studied will be written by non-European writers. Particular focus will vary according to instructor. Course may focus on a theme (e.g., the heroic struggle, nation and identity) or a region (e.g., the history of African literature). Course work will include at least one analytical essay.

ENG243 The Art of the Film (3 crs.)

Studies film as a highly complex art form and focuses chiefly on direction, script, editing, and cinematography. Classic films by such internationally famous directors as Bergman, Kurosawa, Fellini, Herzog, Hitchcock, Lean, Allen, and Huston are screened. A wide variety of short films (experimental, documentary, avant-garde) by independent filmmakers are also shown and discussed. As many films are based on well known literary works, a novel (such as Heart of Darkness, The Great Gatsby, Wuthering Heights) or play (Hamlet, Hippolytus, A Streetcar Named Desire) is studied along with its cinematic counterpart. Students write critiques on feature films. This course satisfies general education requirements.

ENG248 Introduction to Culturally Diverse Literature of the U.S. (3 crs.)

Introduces literature by writers including African-American, Hispanic American, Asian American, and Native American descent. Representative authors may include but not be limited to John Edgar Wideman, Junot Diaz, Leslie Marmon Silko and Amy Tan. Expect to write at least one short analytical paper dealing with works read in the course. Course satisfies general education diversity requirements; fulfills general education literature requirement for Category B.

ENG250 Introduction to Literature (3 crs.)

Read, think, and write about literature and its elements as appropriate for the general education curriculum. Provides practice in formal and thematic analysis of literature. Expect to write at least one analytic paper dealing with these components in the work assigned. Course satisfies the general education requirement for a Category B literature course.

ENG256 Introduction to Mythology (3 crs.)

Introduces the major myths of classical Western and other cultures. Defines and demonstrates these myths as they are to be found in literature. Some attention is given to theories of myth, e.g., Frazer, Freud, Levi-Strauss. Expect to write at least one analytic paper dealing with mythical elements in works of literature read for the course.

ENG304 Literary Criticism (3 crs.)

Covers historical and recent literary criticism and its applications in the analysis of literary texts. While reading assignments will be primarily in theory, writing assignments may focus either on theories themselves or on their analytic application.

ENG307 Poetry Writing (3 crs.)

Provides the opportunity for students to develop interests and skills in writing poetry. Courses utilizes a workshop approach for discussion and critique of writing as well as individual conferences with the instructor. Students also read and analyze published poetry and engage in writing exercises. Students should expect to write and revise at least fifteen pages of poetry.

ENG308 Fiction Writing (3 crs.)

Provides the opportunity for students to develop interests and skills in writing fiction. Courses utilizes a workshop approach for discussion and critique of writing as well as individual conferences with the instructor. Students also read and analyze published works of short fiction and engage in various writing exercises. Students should expect to write and revise at least two stories and produce a final portfolio of their work.

ENG318 Studies in English Renaissance Literature (3 crs.)

Provides in-depth study of selected English Renaissance literature, from around 1500-1660. Content varies by instructor but will include works by at least two writers. Featured topics may include literary genres or modes (e.g., the sonnet, revenge tragedies or conduct books); themes (e.g., the representation of women or iconography); or topics important to the time period (e.g., the Reformation, New World exploration or the English Civil War). Expect to write at least one analytic paper requiring research.

ENG323 Reviewing the Arts for Publication (3 crs.)

Provides practical experience in writing critical reviews in the arts: music, dance, painting, literature, sculpture and architecture. Writing will be done in a variety of publication formats (mass circulation weekly, daily newspaper, professional journal). Some time will be given to readings in the history of the arts and related ideas.

ENG330 Shakespeare (3 crs.)

Presents a representative range, by chronology and by genre, of Shakespeare's plays. Emphasizes the study of the texts' poetic structure and of dramatic performance, illuminated by contemporary video productions of some plays. Expect to write at least one analytic paper on one or more of the plays read.

ENG333 Cultural Studies (3 crs.)

Involves analysis of cultural artifacts, institutions, rituals, objects, and/or processes that may be interpreted as representing a culture's system of beliefs, values, hierarchies, ideologies, or codes. This may involve work with literary texts as well as historical documents, legal codes, material objects, music, film, and other cultural productions. Possible topics might include studies of body representation in the Civil War era; church doctrine and discourses of gender in the Middle Ages; the rise of the phonograph and the Harlem Renaissance; the politics of fashion and cosmetics during the 1960s; the fanzine and ideologies of gender in punk subculture; or film noir and "race" in the Cold War. Expect to write at least one analytical paper. Specific content will vary according to instructor.

ENG343 Film Criticism (3 crs.)

Examination of major practical and theoretical concepts of film criticism. Through weekly screenings and assigned readings, students will become familiar with methods of film analysis and with the range of current critical discourse on film. A variety of critical approaches will be chosen to illustrate the advantages of a multiple perspective. Expect to write a film sequence analysis and at least one research paper dealing with one or more of the films studied in the course. Prerequisites: ENG243 or HCS240 or permission of instructor.

ENG345 Women's Literature (3 crs.)

Introduces poetry, drama, and fiction written by women. Representative authors include Emily Dickinson, Lorraine Hansberry, Doris Lessing. Expect to write at least one analytic paper dealing with works read in the course.

ENG358 Ethnic Literature (3 crs.)

Introduces literature by members of American minority groups such as Blacks, Hispanics, and Native Americans. Representative authors include Ralph Ellison, Amando Muro, and Leslie Marmon Silko. Expect to write at least one analytic paper dealing with works read in the course.

ENG366 History and Structure of the English Language (3 crs.)

Provides in-depth study of principles of English grammar, including phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and usage. Provides an overview of the geographical, social, and linguistic history of the English language and its speakers. Expect to write at least one researched essay dealing with some aspect of the English language.

ENG370 Queer Studies (3 crs.)

A concentrated interdisciplinary study of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and/or transgender (GLBT) literature in the context of the history of GLBT social and political movements and the branch of cultural theory known as queer theory. Works from a variety of genres by GLBT authors and/or containing queer thematic content will be examined in a non-homophobic environment. Students will examine continuing debates, sparked by the rise of queer theory, about topics such as the constructed or essential nature of sexuality and gender. Provides students with a better understanding of the artistic contributions and political struggles of GLBT figures as well as an invigorating analytical tool (queer theory) with interdisciplinary applications. Students should expect to write at least one analytical paper dealing with one or more works read for the course.

ENG375 African-American Literature (3 crs.)

Covers the origin and development of literary works by black Americans from the 18th century to the present day. Students will read autobiographies, poems, novels and essays by such major writers as Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison. Requires oral and written reports and essay examinations.

ENG376 Studies in Medieval Literature (3 crs.)

Provides an in-depth study of selected writers and/or topics in English and continental literature from ca. 800-1485. Possible topics include Chaucer and the 14th century; medieval drama; the literature of medieval women; Arthurian traditions; early medieval literature, 700-1066. Expect to write at least one research paper dealing with one or more works read for the course.

ENG377 Studies in Restoration and 18th Century British Literature (3 crs.)

Provides an in-depth study of selected works written by British writers from 1660 to 1800. Content, that varies depending on the instructor, may emphasize a genre, a theme, or a time period. For instance, may focus on the novel from John Bunyan to Jane Austen, the mythic vision of British nationhood, or poetry and drama from the Age of Johnson. Expect to write at least one analytical paper dealing with works read in the course.

ENG378 Studies in Early American Literature (3 crs.)

Provides an in-depth study of selected early American literature, roughly the beginnings through 1820. Content and focus varies by instructor; however, featured topics may include literature of European exploration, religious or political writings, seduction novels, and/or captivity narratives. Instructors may focus on genre, theme, or authors. Expect to write at least one analytic paper dealing with one or more works read for the course.

ENG380 Studies in 19th Century British Literature (3 crs.)

Provides an in-depth study of selected 19th century British literature. Content varies by instructor. Featured topics may include a historical movement like the Romantic Period, a theme like the woman question, or a specific genre like the novel. Expect to write at least one analytic paper dealing with one or more works read for the course.

ENG381 Studies in 19th Century American Literature (3 crs.)

Provides an in-depth study of selected 19th century American literature. Content and focus varies by instructor; however, featured topics may include the emergence of the American novel, the slave narrative, American transcendentalism, or the poetry of Dickinson and Whitman. Instructors may focus on genre, theme, or authors. Expect to write at least one analytic paper dealing with one or more works read for the course.

ENG382 Studies in 20th Century British Literature (3 crs.)

Provides focused study of two or more 20th century British authors' works. Particular topic varies according to instructor; may focus on a movement (e.g., modernism, the Angry Young Men), a theme (e.g., the immigrant experience in 20th century England), and/or a specific genre (e.g., the novel, the modernist long poem). Students will write at least one analytic paper.

ENG383 Studies in 20th Century American Literature (3 crs.)

Provides an in-depth study of representative American writers and works from the just-completed century. Selection of texts by at least two such writers will vary according to instructor. May concentrate on the question of modernity/postmodernity, the emergence of distinctive regional literature(s), or the response to major historic events of the period such as the Great Depression or World War II. Expect to write at least one analytic paper.

ENG385 Studies in Literature of the Postcolonial World (3 crs.)

Provides focused study of works by authors from Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, the Pacific, Latin America, and/or the Middle East writing after the age of European colonial rule. May focus on a theme (e.g., nation and identity, the poetics of decolonization), an author or movement (e.g., Chinua Achebe, the Negritude movement), genre (e.g., poetry in national liberation movements, the South Asian novel) or a region (e.g., Caribbean literature). Particular focus will vary according to instructor. Course work will include at least one analytical essay.

ENG387 English Internship I (3 crs.)

Contact department for further information on internships.

ENG388 Independent Study–Senior Paper (3 crs.)

Allows senior English majors to write a lengthy critical paper on a topic of their choice. Students wishing to exercise this option should submit a proposal to the curriculum committee of the English department no later than March 30 of their junior year. Must be taken as an independent study course in the final semester of the student's senior year.

ENG389 English Internship II (3 crs.)

Contact department for further information on internships.

ENG394 Selected Topics in English (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental interest not covered by regular course offerings.

ENG420 Studies in Writing (3 crs.)

Provides in-depth study of the history, theory, and/or teaching of writing. Content varies by instructor. Featured topics may include rhetorical theory and history, writing pedagogy, or politics and practices of literacy. Expect to produce at least 20 pages of writing in a combination of shorter and longer assignments, including an analytical paper.

ENG426 Adolescent Literature (3 crs.)

Acquaints secondary English pre-service teachers with award-winning literature and teaching resources to use with adolescents in grades 7-12. Includes examination of the psychological and developmental needs of the adolescent; how to accommodate variety of student abilities and interests within a classroom; and how to incorporate adolescent literature in the secondary English curriculum. Representative authors include Blume, Hinton, Cormier, Lowry, and Paterson. Expect to write at least one analytical paper and develop materials for instructional purposes.

ENG427 Advanced Poetry Workshop (3 crs.)

Provides the opportunity for advanced students to develop their abilities to write original, publishable poetry with special emphasis on the development of a significant body of work. Taught as a workshop; individual tutorials will also be arranged for student writers. In-depth readings and lectures will cover recent developments, both theoretical and practical, in the poetry field. Each student should expect to write and revise at least 15 pages of poetry, and to produce a final portfolio of course work. Prerequisite: ENG 307 or permission of instructor.

ENG428 Advanced Fiction Workshop (3 crs.)

Provides opportunity for advanced students to develop their abilities to write original, publishable fiction with special emphasis on the development of a significant body of work. Taught as a workshop; individual tutorials will also be arranged for student writers. In-depth readings and lectures will cover recent developments, both theoretical and practical, in prose genres including short fiction and the novel. Each student should expect to write and revise at least two or more short works of fiction, or chapters of a novel, and to produce a final portfolio. Prerequisite: ENG 308 or permission of instructor.

ENG438 Technical Professional Writing II (3 crs.)

Incorporate theories of technical and professional communication into writing practice. Students use argumentative rhetorical strategies, analyze audience needs, and consider ethical implications as they prepare advanced projects in technical writing. Emphasizes critical evaluation of information, project design and implementation, and organizational skills for collaborative projects. Students complete advanced assignments, such as writing a grant proposal, creating online user documentation, preparing a research report in a hyperlinked format, and making a persuasive presentation using computer-generated graphics. Serves as preparation for an internship in technical or professional writing; and a significant asset for students whose employment goals require strong writing skills and the ability to lead and to coordinate projects. Prerequisite: ENG238.

ENG464 Seminar in a Major Author (3 crs.)

In-depth analysis of representative works by a single author and familiarizes students with relevant secondary sources associated with the author. Particular author varies according to the instructor. Expect to write at least one lengthy documented paper dealing with works covered in the class. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the department.

ENG465 Seminar in Creative Nonfiction (3 crs.)

Examines prose that claims to be a factual representation of the truth in a narrative form. Genres that may be studied include autobiography, memoir, biography, history, documentary writing, essay, travel writing, nature writing, and writing about culture. Works by more than one author will be read; may emphasize determining characteristics of the genre rather than the chronological period in which it appears. Expect to write at least one lengthy analytic paper. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the department.

ENG466 Seminar in Literary Theory (3 crs.)

In-depth study of one or more theoretical perspectives in literary criticism. Particular theories and authors studied varies according to the instructor. May focus on a theoretical movement (e.g., deconstruction, reader-response) or the works of one or more important theorists (e.g., Fredric Jameson, Stanley Fish). May also be organized around a particular set of issues or concerns relevant to theories of literary criticism (e.g., race in postmodern theory, the meaning of the author in literary theory). Expect to write at least one lengthy analytic paper. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the department.

ENG467 Seminar in Drama (3 crs.)

Examines drama's fundamental components — plot, character, and what Aristotle calls thought (every effect produced in speech) — within the spatial context of a stage. Concerned, in particular, with performance of drama. Attendance at relevant area stage performances and viewing films and video tapes augment textual study. Requires thoughtful critical reading and critical writing beyond requirements of lower level courses. Both activities done in terms of a non-chronological cluster of significant dramatists, e.g., Marlowe, Ibsen, O'Neill, which may vary from instructor to instructor. Enables students to understand in-depth the components of drama and their various utilizations regardless of a dramatist's time period or individual style. Expect to write at least one lengthy analytic paper dealing with one or more of the components in a work or works read for the seminar.

ENG468 Seminar in Fiction (3 crs.)

Examines fiction's fundamental components — plot, character, and narrative point-of-view. Requires thoughtful critical reading and critical writing beyond requirements of lower level courses. Both activities done in terms of non-chronological cluster of significant fiction writers, e.g., Sterne, Bronte, Faulkner, which may vary from instructor to instructor. Enables students to understand in-depth the components of fiction and their various utilizations, regardless of a fiction writer's time period or individual style. Expect to write at least one lengthy analytic paper dealing with one or more of the components in a work or works read for the seminar.

ENG469 Seminar in Poetry (3 crs.)

Examines poetry's fundamental components — image, sound, and the interplay of concepts. Requires thoughtful critical reading and critical writing beyond requirements of lower level courses. Both activities done in terms of a non-chronological cluster of significant poets, e.g., Milton, Tennyson, Moore, which may vary from instructor to instructor. Enables students to understand in-depth the components and their various utilizations, regardless of a poet's time period or individual style. Expect to write at least one lengthy analytic paper dealing with one or more of the components in a work or works read for the seminar.

ENG490 Selected Topics in English (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental interest not covered by regular course offerings.

 

ENG505 Seminar in Poetry (3 crs.)

Provides in-service teachers and certification students with advanced study of poetry and poetics. Course may focus on a movement or school of thought (e.g. the Romantics, the Harlem Renaissance), an historical period, the poetry of a defined social group (e.g. Hispanic American poetry, African women's poetry), and/or a thematic concern. Helps teachers understand current critical and theoretical approaches to poetry. Specific topic will vary according to instructor.

ENG506 Seminar in Fiction (3 crs.)

Provides in-service teachers and certification students with advanced study of fiction. Course may focus on an historical period (e.g. 19th-century novel, short fiction of the 1940s), a movement or school of thought (e.g. modern novel, postmodern narratives), the fiction of a socially defined group (African-American novels, Native-American narrative), and/or a thematic concern. Helps teachers understand current critical and theoretical approaches to fiction. Specific topic will vary according to instructor.

ENG507 Seminar in Drama/Film (3 crs.)

Provides in-service teachers and certification students with advanced study of drama and/or film. Course may focus on an historical period (e.g. Elizabethan tragedy, modernist drama), a movement or school of thought (e.g. French New Wave cinema), the drama and/or films of a socially defined group (African-American cinema, gay/lesbian theater), a particular genre (e.g. tragedy, film noir), and/or a thematic concern. Helps teachers understand current critical and theoretical approaches to drama and/or film. Specific topic will vary according to instructor.

ENG511 Seminar in Cultural Studies (3 crs.)

Examines textual media (literature, film, etc.) in relation to other cultural practices and to social and historical structures. Might involve, for example, studies of film noir in relation to the postwar anticommunist hysteria; race in Renaissance literature and the rise of colonialist economy; gay "camp" style, postmodern poetics, and performance art. Introduces students to important theories and methodologies of cultural study and relates them to study of literary texts. One or more critical papers required. Specific content varies according to instructor. Prerequisite: ENG500.

ENG512 Seminar in Composition and Rhetoric (3 crs.)

Introduces graduate students to the field of composition and rhetoric, the area of English studies specifically concerned with methods, implications, and challenges of teaching writing. Depending on the instructor and the interests of the students, course may focus more or less on the following areas: historical contexts in classical rhetoric, such as the revival of Sophistic rhetoric; current theories as applied in composition studies, such as social constructionism; major movements in composition pedagogy, such as collaborative writing or computers and composition. One or more researched essays and class presentations required. Prerequisite: ENG500.

ENG515 Seminar in American Literature (3 crs.)

Provides in-service teachers and certification students with advanced study of American literature. Course may focus on an historical period (e.g. the American Renaissance, Realism, Naturalism), a movement or school of thought (e.g. American Transcendentalism, the Imagist poets), a particular genre (e.g. the novel, American drama), a socially defined group (e.g. slave narratives, Latino/a novels), and/or a thematic concern. Helps teachers understand current critical and theoretical approaches to fiction. Specific topic will vary according to instructor.

ENG516 Seminar in British Literature (3 crs.)

Provides in-service teachers and certification students with advanced study of British literature. Course may focus on an historical period (e.g. the Renaissance, the Victorian Age), a movement or school of thought (e.g. fin de siecle aestheticism, the Bloomsbury group), a particular genre (e.g. the lyric, the novel), a socially defined group (e.g. working class fiction, black British poetry), and/or a thematic concern. Helps teachers understand current critical and theoretical approaches to fiction. Specific topic will vary according to instructor.

ENG517 Seminar in World Literature (3 crs.)

Provides in-service teachers and certification students with advanced study of literature in a global context. Course may focus on an specific national and/or regional literature (e.g. Indian fiction, Central American poetry), a transnational movement (e.g. postcolonialsism, surrealism), a genre in global contexts (e.g. drama in Europe, poetry of the black Atlantic), a historical period (e.g. European literature of the fin de siecle, 20th century African novel), and/or a thematic concern.

ENG518 Seminar in Multicultural Literature (3 crs.)

Provides in-service teachers and certification students with advanced study of American literature in a multicultural context. At least two historically under-represented social groups will be represented by the authors studied. Course may focus on a genre (e.g. minority American poetry), a historical period (e.g. minority American literature in the postbellum, Native American and Chicano poetry of the Vietnam era), and/or a thematic concern. Helps teachers understand current critical and theoretical approaches to the cultural diversity of American literature. Specific topic will vary according to instructor.

ENG525 Seminar in Teaching English/language Arts (3 crs.)

Provides in-service teachers and certification students with current research and methodology for teaching the English/language arts. Course gives students the opportunity to explore topics such as the student-centered literature class, theories of the reader-response criticism as they apply to the classroom, incarnations of the writing process, reading/writing workshop, trends in assessment, technology in the English classroom, and other subjects as appropriate.

ENG530 Seminar in Creative Writing (3 crs.)

For graduate students who wish to develop their skills in writing original fiction, poetry, or drama, taught on a workshop basis. Students present in-progress portions of their work in class and take part in critical discussion based on the presentations of others. Whereas the emphasis is upon the production of substantial work in any one of these genres, the instructor makes directed reading assignments. Fiction writers should expect to complete at least two short stories or a novel chapter; poets should expect to complete a portfolio of at least 12 pages of poetry; playwrights should expect to complete two one-act plays or a full-length (three or more acts) play.

Ethnic Studies (ETH)

ETH100 Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3 crs.)

Introduces perspectives about ethnic realities in America. Through an interdisciplinary examination of intellectual thought presented through various formats, students facilitate the formation of a well-rounded view of ethnic groups, an awareness of their own ethnicity, and an appreciation for human diversity. Major emphasis on African-Americans, Asian Americans, Latino Americans, and Native Americans. Also focuses on immigration experiences of European ethnic groups.

ETH101 Introduction to African-American Studies (3 crs.)

Provides an interdisciplinary overview of the various perspectives that have impacted African-American life and culture. Introduces the Afrocentric conceptual framework as well as other intellectual paths of African-American thought. These intellectual frameworks are the foundation for critical understanding and discussion of African-American experiences and the relevance of African-American studies as an academic discipline.

ETH102 Introduction to Latino Studies (3 crs.)

Study of Latino life and culture in the United States through a survey of literature, art, films, and other cultural media. Students will be given the background information necessary to explore the issues presented in these and other works.

ETH390 Ethnic Studies Internship (3 crs.)

Contact Ethnic Studies for further information on internships.

Exercise Science (ESC)

ESC200 Lifestyle Management (3 crs.)

Designed to assist young adults in the understanding of and planning for a lifelong healthful lifestyle. Wellness topics discussed include the five components of health-related fitness, chronic disease prevention, stress management, nutrition, and weight management with an emphasis on lifetime fitness. Students will design and implement an individualized fitness and behavior modification program.

ESC207 Stress Management (3 crs.)

Explores stress reaction and its relationship to illness and disease. Provides intervention strategies to limit harmful effects in addition to other such skills necessary for successful life management.

ESC243 Physiological Basis of Sport (3 crs.)

Involves the study of the physiological basis for sport performance with a focus on how the body responds to acute exercise and how it adapts to chronic exercise. Restricted to coaching/exercise science minors until schedule clean-up. Prerequisite: BIO150.

ESC244 Mechanical Analysis of Sports Skills (3 crs.)

Provides studies and experiences in anatomical and mechanical principles of sports skills. Restricted to exercise science majors/minors and coaching minors until schedule clean-up.

ESC250 Introduction to Kinesiology (3 crs.)

Introduction to variety of subdisciplines within the discipline of kinesiology. May include biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor learning and control, sport and exercise psychology, and sport sociology. Restricted to exercise science majors/minors until schedule clean-up.

ESC321 Exercise Physiology (4 crs.)

Focus on development of knowledge in applied physiology as a basis for understanding the physiological responses and adaptations related to acute and chronic exercise stress. Includes applied learning experiences that facilitate student understanding. Three hour lecture and one hour lab per week. Open to exercise science majors only until schedule clean-up. Prerequisite: ESC250 [Pre or Co] and BIO350.

ESC325 Sport Psychology (3 crs.)

Provides knowledge about effects of psychological factors on behavior in sport (i.e., anxiety, motivation, concentration and confidence) and the psychological effect participation in sport or physical activity has on the performer (i.e., anxiety reduction, aggressive behavior and personality development.) Restricted to coaching minors until schedule clean-up.

ESC333 Biomechanics (3 crs.)

Study of qualitative and quantitative analysis of mechanical principles of human motion. Quantitative analysis will include the kinematic and kinetic description of linear and angular motion associated with sport skills and exercise activities. Restricted to exercise science majors. Prerequisites: ESC244, ESC250, BIO371 & PHY121. Offered Spring Semester only.

ESC336 Motor Behavior (3 crs.)

Subdiscipline of Exercise Science concerned with understanding the processes responsible for the acquisition, performance, and retention of motor skills as explored through motor learning, motor control, and motor development throughout a life span. Restricted to exercise science majors/minors until schedule clean-up. Prerequisites: ESC250.

ESC339 Exercise Science Seminar (1 - 3 cr.)

Discussion of selected area within exercise science. Main focus of to supplement learning through discussion, laboratory, and/or research of an area within exercise science. Prerequisites possible. Seminar topics announced each semester.

ESC340 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (3 crs.)

Provides knowledge and competencies in the care and prevention of athletic injuries. Also provides CPR and First Aid certification. Restricted to exercise science majors/minors and coaching minors. Prerequisite: for minors BIO150 and for majors ESC250 Pre/Co and BIO115 & Bio116

ESC350 Nutrition for Sport & Fitness (3 crs.)

Provides current and accurate recommendations regarding the role of nutrition in fitness and sport performance. Restricted to exercise science majors/minors. Health science students admitted during schedule adjustment. Prerequisite: ESC243 or ESC321.

ESC352 Psychology of Physical Activity (3 crs.)

Covers four major topic areas: research methods and potential biases in the behavioral sciences; the effects of exercise and physical activity on mental health; behavioral approaches and theories to understanding and influencing physical activity; and psychosocial factors as they relate to health, chronic disease, and pain. Students required to read and critically evaluate primary research articles as well as literature reviews. Emphasizes a biopsychosocial approach to health and illness. Issues unique to children, older adults, those with chronic disease and disability, women, and people of color highlighted. Sensitivity to diversity, including race, class, ethnicity, and gender emphasized. Course uses lectures and class discussions. Restricted to exercise science majors/minors until schedule clean-up. Prerequisite: ESC250 & PSY101.

ESC353 Research Design and Statistics for Exercise Science (3 crs.)

Provides an understanding and interpretation of research methods within Exercise Science. Learn basic concepts for designing a research project within exercise science. Introduces data collection, data analysis, presentation of the data, and ethical principles surrounding research. Exercise science majors only. Prerequisite: ESC244, ESC321 and MAT117.

ESC393 Selected Topics - Exercise Science (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

ESC400 Methods of Coaching (3 crs.)

Provides course work and practical field experience in a supervised sport setting. Must have completed 12 credits toward the coaching minor requirement. Restricted to coaching minors. Prerequisite: ESC340.

ESC420 Cardiac Rehab & Special Populations (4 crs.)

Provides a technical expertise in cardiac rehabilitation and basic ECG interpretation. Population specific issues related to children, females, the elderly, diabetes and cancer, as well as other chronic diseases, and how they relate to exercise will be explored. Three hours lecture and one hour lab per week. Restricted to exercise science majors. Prerequisites: ESC250 & ESC321.

ESC421 Exercise Physiology II (4 crs.)

Provides an understanding of the physiology of exercise with an emphasis on the physiological responses and adaptations to exercise, the relationship between health and fitness, and the physiology of athletic performance. Three hours lecture and one hour lab per week. Restricted to exercise science majors. Prerequisite: ESC321.

ESC422 Exercise Testing and Prescription (3 crs.)

Designed to aid in gaining the knowledge and practical application of testing, programming, and techniques associated with fitness training based on cardiorespiratory, flexibility, and resistance training guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). Restricted to exercise science majors. Prerequisites: ESC250 and ESC421 (Pre/Co).

ESC424 Internship (6/9/12 crs.)

Offers a practical, research, observational, study, and/or work experience within an area or career path of student's choice through constructive participation within the field of Exercise Science. Prerequisites: Must have a 2.50 QPA overall; must have completed all exercise science major course requirements with a grade of C or above.

ESC490 Selected Topics – Exercise Science (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

Finance (FIN)

FIN311 Financial Management (3 crs.)

Introduces concepts and techniques of financial management in the context of a business firm seeking to maximize the firm's value. Topics include financial markets, wealth maximization, cash flow and financial statements, valuation of stocks and bonds, cost of capital, risk and return, analysis of long-term financing, capital structure, working capital management, and international aspects of financial management. Prerequisites: ACC200, ECO113 or ECO102 and junior standing.

FIN312 Investments (3 crs.)

Deals with the basic principles of security analysis and analytical techniques. Includes a study of the economic functions and operations of the security markets, portfolio management, and the formulation of investment programs. Prerequisites: FIN311 and SCM200 or permission of department chair.

FIN313 Advanced Financial Management (3 crs.)

Explores financial theory and financial decision models necessary for handling complex problems. Applications are illustrated by means of case material. Prerequisites: FIN311 and SCM200 or permission of department chair.

FIN314 Financial Institutions (3 crs.)

Approaches financial institutions and capital markets from a managerial point of view. Topical coverage includes financial management principles and policies unique to commercial banks, savings institutions, pension funds, and insurance companies. Prerequisites: FIN311 and SCM200 or permission of department chair.

FIN320 Risk Management and Insurance (3 crs.)

Introduces the concept of pure risk and scope of exposure facing individuals, businesses, and other organizations. Study includes examinations of various risk control techniques with special emphasis on insurance. Prerequisites: FIN311 and SCM200 or permission of department chair.

FIN321 Personal Financial Planning (3 crs.)

Introduces the principles of personal financial planning. Includes financial planning process, client interactions, time value of money applications, personal financial statements, cash flow and debt management, asset acquisition, education planning, overview of risk management investment planning and retirement planning, special circumstances, plan integration, ethics, and the business of financial planning. Prerequisites: FIN312 and FIN320.

FIN322 Estate Planning (3 crs.)

Focuses on efficient conservation and transfer of wealth consistent with the client's goals. Study of the legal, tax, financial, and non-financial aspects of this process, covering topics such as trusts, wills, probate, advanced directives, charitable giving, wealth transfers, and related taxes. Prerequisites: BSL261, ACC306 (at least concurrently), and FIN320 (at least concurrently).

FIN324 Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits (3 crs.)

Provides knowledge of both public and private retirement plans. Public plans include Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid. Private plans include defined benefit and defined contribution plans and their regulatory provisions. Specifics of the various plans are analyzed as well as non-qualified deferred compensation plans. Issues individuals face in retirement, such as life-styles choices and medical issues also discussed. Prerequisite: FIN311.

FIN333 Applied Company and Security Analysis (3 crs.)

Develops the ability to understand and analyze how forecasts for the economy, stock market, industries, and companies are used in a traditional fundamental analysis approach to investing. Enables students to calculate and interpret the return and risk measures for investment instruments (e.g., bond, preferred stock, and common stock). Prerequisites: FIN311 and SCM200 or permission of department chair.

FIN340 Principles of Real Estate (3 crs.)

Introduces the field of real estate. Designed to provide an understanding of the fundamental determinants of real estate value, the real estate market within which such value is established, real estate laws, instruments and institutions which facilitate and regulate the managerial functions required for efficient growth, and the allocation of real estate resources. Prerequisite: FIN311 or permission of department chair.

FIN393 Selected Topics in Finance (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

FIN405 Real Estate Appraisal and Investment Analysis (3 crs.)

Basic course in real estate appraisal stressing techniques of appraisal, investment analysis, and the valuation theory underlying these methodologies. Practical application in appraising part of course. Prerequisite: FIN311 or permission of department chair.

FIN414 Bank Management (3 crs.)

Deals with the regulatory and managerial environment within which the bank manager operates. Concerned with the regulatory framework which controls the balance sheet policies of a bank as well as branching and merger activity. Other selected advanced topics of bank management, such as the management of deposits and capital adequacy, the bank's balance sheet, assets, and liquidity, are addressed. Prerequisite: FIN314 or permission of department chair.

FIN425 Global Financial Management (3 crs.)

Studies the international environment, the foreign exchange risk management, the investment decision, the financing decision, and management of ongoing business operations in global settings. Emphasis on the analysis and evaluation of the investment decision, financial decision, and operational and financial risk in foreign countries. Prerequisite: FIN311 and SCM200 or permission of department chair.

FIN434,435 Investment Management Program (1-3 crs.)

Students manage a real money security portfolio to obtain practical investing experience. Students establish investment philosophy, investment objectives and policies, identify investment strategies, and present recommendations for buying and selling investment securities toward the goal of constructing and managing a real portfolio. Prerequisites: FIN333 and departmental approval.

FIN442 Derivatives Markets (3 crs.)

Broad overview of different types of financial derivatives (forwards, futures, options, options on futures, and swaps), while focusing on the principles that determine market prices. To integrate the understanding of these instruments, the discussion emphasizes the relationships among futures, options, and swaps. Emphasizes the application of financial derivatives as risk management tools, not as instruments of speculation. Prerequisite: FIN312 or permission of department chair.

FIN490 Selected Topics in Finance (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

French (FRN)

FRN101 Beginning French I (3 crs.)

Designed for students who have never studied the language. Both textbook and authentic materials used to enable students to express themselves on personalized topics.

FRN102 Beginning French II (3 crs.)

Continuation of FRN101. Both textbook and authentic materials used to enable students to express themselves on a variety of topics concerning self, family, and friends. Prerequisite: FRN101 or placement.

FRN103 Intermediate French (3 crs.)

Continuation of FRN102. Both textbook and authentic materials used to enable students to express themselves on a variety of topics concerning self, family, friends, and their communities. Reading, writing, listening and speaking are combined to explore the history, geography, music, arts, and film of the French-speaking world. Prerequisite: FRN102 or placement.

FRN150 French Civilization (3 crs.)

Overview of French cultural traditions from early times to the present followed by an examination of the French way of thinking in terms of myth and reality through a survey of French education, politics, geography and sociology. Examines French-speaking civilizations in Africa, North America, and the West Indies. Taught in English; a reading knowledge of French helpful but not essential for non-majors.

FRN202 Intermediate Conversation Through the Media (3 crs.)

Designated to promote and improve speaking and listening comprehension skills in the language through explorations of various contemporary media. Utilizing radio and television broadcasts, Internet materials, video, film, and audio programs and the tradition of printed text, students consider current topics of interest through discussion, debate and oral presentations. Special attention given to vocabulary building and improving students' oral/aural proficiency. May be taken concurrently with FRN103 with permission of the department. Prerequisite: FRN103 or department placement.

FRN204 Ideas and Cultures from the French-Speaking World (3 crs.)

Introduction to comparative cultural studies of the French and Francophone world. Exploration of the rich cultural exchanges among Francophone communities with an emphasis on their geographical, historical and social contexts undertaken. Sustained attention will be given to oral and written expression. Prerequisite: FRN103 or placement.

FRN308 Diction et Comprehension (3 crs.)

Intensive pronunciation and intonation drills supported by examination of phonetic principles. Sound production is stressed and student will learn to distinguish stylistic nuances in phonetic variants. Graduated listening comprehension exercises train the student to understand various style levels, regional and national variations in accent, etc. Prerequisite: FRN202, FRN204 or permission of instructor.

FRN309 French Grammar (3 crs.)

Examines in detail the structure of the French language. Extensive oral and written exercises are designed to provide the more advanced student with a mastery of those elements of French which pose the greatest difficulties for the American student. Prerequisite: FRN202, FRN204 or permission of instructor.

FRN316 Composition and Stylistics (3 crs.)

Intended to help develop basic writing skills in sustained contexts: narratives, descriptions, dialogs, essays, etc. Emphasizes syntax of written French at formal and semiformal levels. Prerequisite: FRN202, FRN204 or permission of instructor.

FRN320 French for the Professions (3 crs.)

Emphasizes skills in communication in the daily world of business, health professions, social work, law enforcement, etc. May include techniques of translation, a study of the economic and business systems in the French-speaking world, and extensive practice in using forms and expressions frequently used in correspondence of the above mentioned professions. Content may be adapted to students' needs. Prerequisite: FRN202, FRN204 or permission of instructor.

FRN330 Masterpieces of French Literature (3 crs.)

Designed to pursue selective readings of classical French literature in all genres from the medieval period to the present day. Students will engage in critical discussions of the textual examples in efforts to trace the evolution of particular literary themes and styles. Prerequisite: FRN202, FRN204 or permission of instructor.

FRN331 Masterpieces of Francophone Literature (3 crs.)

Introduction to rich variety of authors writing in French-speaking world outside of metropolitan France. Works by authors from North and sub-Saharan Africa, Québec, and other regions of Canada, as well as the Caribbean region, Indian Ocean and South Pacific can be included. Prerequisite: FRN202, FRN204 or permission of instructor.

FRN340 Genres Litteraires (3 crs.)

Offers an intensive critical study of a single literary genre (novel, short story, essay, poetry, theatre) within the French and/or Francophone traditions. Content will vary depending on the instructor. Prerequisite: FRN202, FRN204 or permission of instructor.

FRN380 Aspects De La Civilisation FranÇaise/Francophone (3 crs.)

Particular topics, historical events or political and artistic movements that have assisted in fashioning French and Francophone cultures will be critically explored. Prerequisite: FRN202, FRN204 or permission of instructor.

FRN400 Seminar: Advanced Studies in French Language and Literature (3 crs.)

Detailed examination of specific aspects of French literature authors, genres, literary and philosophic schools, or linguistic problems such as translation and dialects. Seminar may be taken more than once provided a specific topic is not repeated. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

FRN490 Selected Topics (3 crs.)

Geography (GEO)

GEO101 World Geography (3 crs.)

Study of basic global patterns and problems and the distinctive characteristics and interconnections of world culture regions with human ways of living viewed in their interactions and associations with natural, human, and technological resources of aspects of the environment. Course made functional in everyday living through perception of relations between concepts of the course and current world problems.

GEO103 Geography of the United States and Canada (3 crs.)

Introductory regional analysis of population, land utilization, and economic activity through a comprehensive study of interrelationships between humans and the physical and cultural environments. Provides a conceptual framework within which past, present, and future rural and urban environments of the United States and Canada become explainable.

GEO105 Physical Geography (3 crs.)

Studies way the basic natural phenomena of air, water, and ground mutually interact and the way in which these interactions vary from one part of the earth to another to yield different natural environmental regions. Two hours lecture/two hours lab/week.

GEO140 Cultural Geography (3 crs.)

Examines the diverse cultural landscapes and behavioral patterns of the world. The dynamic aspects of our technological era are viewed as they influence cultural realms differing in race, language, religion, economy, and population distribution. The origin and diffusion of skills and tools used by societies to transform and adjust to their environments will be surveyed.

GEO202 GIS I: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3 crs.)

Introduction to the fundamental mapping and computer concepts and skills that underlie Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and every other geotechnology. Topics include representation (raster vs. vector), display, map scale, coordinate systems, data acquisition, and data management.

GEO203 Climatology (3 crs.)

Deals with regional and applied climatology. Areas of emphasis are climatic controls, classification, U.S. precipitation regimes, world climate types, relationship of climate to other physical phenomena, and importance of climate in selected aspects of human activities.

GEO217 Geography of Australia and Oceania (3 crs.)

Appraises development of the island nations and possessions of the southwest Pacific as it examines the several geographic patterns evolved by different cultures in the various physical settings of this region.

GEO222 Map and Air Photo Analysis (3 crs.)

Discussion and independent study of maps and aerial photographs to familiarize students with the nature and properties of maps and aerial photographs and to fundamental analytical techniques used to measure and describe spatially organized information. Laboratory exercises include qualitative and numerical reading, analysis and interpretation of a wide variety of maps and aerial photographs.

GEO224 Soils (3 crs.)

Studies geoenvironmental aspects of soils: their nature and properties, classification and distribution, interpretation of soil surveys, and factors affecting land use decisions. Local soil types, surveys, management and conservation practices, and problems of environmental quality studied. Prerequisite: ESS110 or permission of the instructor.

GEO226 Hydrology (3 crs.)

Presents basic concepts of hydrology with emphasis on the relationship of water to natural and human systems. Major topics include the dynamics of surface water flow, hydrogeology, water pollution, and water resources analysis.

GEO230 Economic Geography (3 crs.)

Investigates and delineates the spatial patterns of the human process of making a living. Each major economic activity is considered in terms of the basic resources available in the physical environment and the existing technical advancement of the culture. Basic geographic considerations relevant in analyzing economic patterns such as locational factors, research tools, and location theory are introduced.

GEO244 Land Use (3 crs.)

Reviews the relationship of people to the land and how technological advances and expanding population have put increasing pressure on lean resources and have created a variety of complex land use dilemmas which affect persons at all levels of society. Rural to urban migration, energy-consumptive settlement patterns, urban sprawl, private land ownership and control, and federal, state and local land use regulations will be studied. Spatial approach of land and the interaction of the physical and cultural environment in the decision-making process will be emphasized.

GEO301 Introduction to Biogeography (3 crs.)

Basic concepts and factors which are important in understanding the processes and influences involved in studying the distribution of terrestrial organisms over the earth will be presented. Some topics of importance include biodiversity; past and present patterns of the distribution of terrestrial organisms; the abiotic, biotic and human influences on those patterns; and a variety of factors related to the various time scales at which organisms can be studied.

GEO305 Geography of Europe (3 crs.)

Regional course designed to develop unbiased understanding of the economic problems of Europe, exclusive of Russia and surrounding regions. Geographic relationships underlying land utilization, boundary disputes, and dominant international problems are considered. Prerequisite: GEO101.

GEO306 Geomorphology (3 crs.)

Studies physical and chemical processes that have in the past and are presently forming the landscape. Description and classification of landforms and the theoretical and dynamic aspects of landform evolution are studied. Geomorphic techniques of quantitative analysis, advanced interpretation of topographic maps and air photographs, and field work are stressed. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisite: ESS110.

GEO308 Geography of Latin America (3 crs.)

Comparative study of the geographical regions of Middle and South America. Latin American relations with the United States and the rest of the world are interpreted through the analysis of the economic, social, and cultural activities of people in relation to the physical factors of this environment. Prerequisite: GEO101.

GEO310 Transportation Geography (3 crs.)

Analyzes overall roles of transportation within the urban context. An integral part is the discussion of current urban transportation problems. Field work involving an evaluation of local transportation needs will be required. Course topics and requirements are flexible enough to meet the needs of students coming from urban studies, economics, business and elementary education.

GEO313 Geography of South and Southeast Asia (3 crs.)

Examines the diverse cultural and physical features giving form to the present political/economic situation in this region and shaping the future.

GEO314 Industrial Geography (3 crs.)

Interpretative survey of the effects in the United States of geographic conditions upon industrial production and commerce, of development of commercial areas, and availability of resources to markets in relation to other regions of the world.

GEO317 Geography of East Asia (3 crs.)

Examines the vast and complex physical and cultural patterns of China, Korea, and Japan. Analysis of present and future economic and political structure is emphasized.

GEO320 Historical Geography (3 crs.)

Emphasizes the reciprocal and causal relationships between the natural environment found in the United States and the historical movement and settlement of man on the varied American environment. Emphasizes interaction between human choice on one hand and the nature of coast lands, islands, rivers, mountains and soil, plains, and climate conditions.

GEO322 Urban Geography (3 crs.)

Surveys the city, its forms, functions, internal and external relations, and evolution. Emphasis on large urban agglomerations, particularly those of the Western World. Individual and group field work examining local and regional urban areas of several classes is integral to the course.

GEO326 Political Geography (3 crs.)

Gives attention to boundary problems, the value and control of colonies, fishing agreements, problems concerning commercial aviation, world trade, world food supplies, control and development of natural resources, and the geographic aspects of problems concerning world peace. Prerequisite: GEO101.

GEO339 Remote Sensing (3 crs.)

Explores viewing and interpreting the earth from aircraft and satellite-borne imaging systems. Examines remote sensing of the Earth and uses the interaction of electromagnetic energy with matter to determine physical properties of surfaces. Imagery will include those from Landsat TM, SPOT, TIMS, and radar.

GEO352 Cartography (3 crs.)

Introduces basic tools of map making. Explains techniques for displaying data and develops skills in compilation, design, and execution of maps.

GEO360 Internship in Geography (3 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

GEO361 Internship in Geography II (1-4 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

GEO363 GIS II: Intermediate Geographic Information Systems (3 crs.)

Continues development of the student's understanding of GIS and extends understanding into spatial analysis. Fundamental concepts covered previously, including scale, earth models, map projections and coordinate systems, are also developed. New major concepts include Boolean logic, overlays, map algebra, binary modeling. Technical skill development focuses on data collection and integration, digitizing, and design of spatial data display. Primary emphasis on using real-world examples in GIS modeling and analysis.

GEO390 Internship in Urban Studies I (3 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

GEO391 Geography Seminar (3 cr.)

Opportunity for advanced students to explore in greater depth those aspects of geography and geographic thought not fully developed in other courses. Geography viewed in light of its historical development and the leading edges of current research. Distinctive areas of specialization opened for in-depth consideration. Drawing upon departmental, interdepartmental and outside sources, seminar designed to stimulate and excite interest in a rapidly expanding professional field concerned with current social and environmental problems. Required for all arts and science and secondary education majors in geography.

GEO393 Selected Topics in Geography (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

GEO394 Internship in Urban Studies II (3 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

GEO402 Medical Geography (3 crs.)

Introduces student to a geographical approach in the analysis of problems regarding environmental health. Dynamic interaction between the total person and the total environment (physical, biological, cultural, economic) lie at the core of geography, a discipline that integrates natural and social sciences. Consideration of such interactions is essential for an understanding of the changes that occur in the distribution of health and disease, when, for instance the environment is altered, or human lifestyles undergo substantial modification.

GEO404 Groundwater and Hydrogeology (3 crs.)

Examines the fundamental concepts of groundwater and hydrogeology in the context of real-world applications on the foundations of theory. Emphasis on the principles of groundwater flow, well installation, field data collection, and the analysis of physical and water chemistry as they relate to professional groundwater investigations. Grades based on exams and application-oriented assignments (problem sets). Required field trip(s) will supplement classroom material (field trip dates and times will be determined during class). One or more of the following courses are suggested prior to enrolling in GEO404: ESS110 or ESS210, and GEO226 or permission of instructor.

GEO415 Regional Geographic Studies (3 crs.)

Opportunity to study the physical and human landscapes within a particular region of the world not covered by regular courses. Departmental faculty bring their regional expertise into the classroom and provide students with a focused examination of the region with respect to current political, social, economic, physical, and environmental issues. Faculty highlight their own work in the region and place their research within the broader regional context.

GEO420 GIS III: Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3 crs.)

Examines advanced topics in GIS analysis such as spatial data uncertainty, error propagation, spatial data display, transformations of geographic phenomena, and visualization. Skills focus on advanced spatial analysis, terrain modeling, georectification of data, and network analysis. Students design and implement an independent GIS project during the course.

GEO425 Image Processing (3 crs.)

Computer processing of remotely-sensed imagery is explored and laboratory exercises enhance understanding of image processing. Intermediate and Advanced processing techniques performed on imagery from local and non-local areas. Techniques include spatial modeling, multispectral classification, and learning new techniques in processing satellite-borne imagery and other data. Successful completion of GEO339 Remote Sensing is suggested.

GEO440 Field Techniques (3 crs.)

Studies geoenvironmental aspects of the local landscape by direct field observation. Various procedures and techniques are utilized to collect data concerning landforms, geology, soil, streams, air quality, population, transportation, housing characteristics and land use. Instruments, maps, air photographs, and statistics are used to aid in the research, analysis, and evaluation of the field problem.

GEO441 Quantitative Methods (3 crs.)

Broad-based education in the geographical sciences requires a proficiency in applying statistical techniques to environmental problems. Provides a comprehensive and empathetic approach to statistical problem solving using practical geographic examples.

GEO444 Environmental Land-Use Planning (3 crs.)

Studies the spatial pattern of land-use development in rural and urban areas and interaction between urbanization and environment. Examines the physical and cultural requirements of environmental land-use planning including the study of the land-use classification, planning and zoning procedures, economic activity and the city as an ecosystem. City planning techniques, land-use mapping and field study of local region are utilized.

GEO446 Water Resources Management (3 crs.)

Roles of water resources management policies and institutions are examined within central theme of unified river basin management. Stresses interrelationships among watershed planning; relevant legislation; agency authority and coordination; and the geography of watershed management. North American case studies used to illustrate multiple use issues, including aquatic ecology, wetlands, floodplain management, recreation, water supply, hydropower, industry, and commercial shipping.

GEO450 Geography-Geology Field Studies (1-3 cr.)

One week to 10-day regional field study observing and analyzing the physical and cultural landscape. Emphasis placed upon the physical and historical geology and geography of a prescribed route including several states. Prerequisites: ESS212, ESS311, GEO103 or permission of the instructor.

GEO490 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

GEO503 FUNDAMENTALS OF GEOENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH (3 CRS.)

Builds student skills common to developing, implementing, and disseminating research projects in the major sub-disciplines of geoenvironmental studies. Generates opportunities to develop critical reading, writing, and presentation skills. Students will develop a literature review and a research proposal, as would be appropriate for either an independent research project or a master's thesis. Also develops fundamental skills for preparing grant proposals, professional reports, and oral and graphic presentations.

GEO514 Urban Environment (3 crs.)

Examines the impact of information technologies (IT) on the arrangement of human activities. The new technologies in information should make it possible to share information on a global scale. Information on problems ranging from hunger, employment opportunities, environmental degradation, traffic congestion, housing, and many other situations can be shared in a very short span of time over vast areas. Use of new opportunities in information availability and information sharing should assist anyone concerned with a vast range of human problems with their potential solutions. Explores the problems and prospects for using information technology to communicate with people in similar or very different cultural and physical environments to guide the growth and development of human activities.

GEO517 Applied Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (3 crs.)

Reviews advanced geographic information systems (GIS) applications and the use of geographic information management technology in environmental analysis. Spatial mapping and data applications will be related to renewable resource management, transportation and logistics, infrastructure management, natural resources and land use planning, public health and safety, environmental hazards, mineral exploration, environmental assessment and monitoring, map and database analysis and research and education. Emphasis is on how GIS can assist in answering questions, solving problems, and analyzing spatial data. State-of-the-art GIS software is used to show applications of geographic information technology for geoenvironmental and natural resource management projects.

GEO522 Geoenvironmental Hydrology (3 crs.)

Focuses on components of the hydrologic cycle including humidity, precipitation, interception, infiltration, soil moisture, evaporation, ground water, and stream flow. Particular emphasis is placed on using models to analyze these hydrological components and address practical hydrological issues such as storm water management, erosion, water quality, and stream and wetland restoration. Local water resources and watersheds are used as the basis for projects and field reports. Many projects will focus on human alterations to the hydrological system.

GEO524 The Geologic Environment (3 crs.)

Concerned with major concepts of physical and applied geology and their relationship to human activity. Analysis of minerals and rocks, earth structures, global tectonics and surficial processes examined in a lecture, laboratory and field investigation format.

GEO528 Geography of Economic and Environmental Systems (3 crs.)

Interpretative survey of the effects manufacturing and economic activities have on land-use development and the environment. Techniques of economic-industrial analysis, mapping procedures, environmental planning policies, and field study of the local region are utilized.

GEO530 Mapping Sciences (3 crs.)

Advanced methods in computer-assisted mapping and map analysis (geographic information systems or GIS). Emphasis placed upon techniques of establishing, managing spatial (geographic) data bases, cartographic modeling and analysis, and digital map composition using state-of-the-art GIS software. One hour lecture, three hours computer laboratory per week.

GEO531 GEOMORPHOLOGY (3 CRS.)

Geomorphology is the systematic description, analysis, and interpretation of landscapes and the processes that change them. Emphasizes both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of landscape change and has three principal objectives: 1) to provide a solid grounding in the basic concepts of process and Quaternary geomorphology, 2) to apply these concepts to the central Appalachian Highlands region, and 3) to examine these relationships in the field. Inclass lecture, discussion, laboratory assignments, outside readings, a written paper and presentation, a local field trip, and a two-day field trip to Maryland and Virginia.

Prerequisites: Introductory geology course or equivalent

GEO532 Disease and the Environment (3 crs.)

Seminar in geoenvironmental health hazards such as solid waste, air, and water pollution. Emphasis on public health problems these hazards pose, the application of geographic methods, and tools of analysis. Means available to cope with geoenvironmental hazards and associated policy debates are examined. Lecture information limited. Students expected to participate actively in every seminar meeting.

GEO536 Problems of the Atmospheric Environment (3 crs.)

Examines and analyzes various weather and climate topics, both natural and human-influenced. Topics include brief review of atmospheric basics, air pollution, ozone, ENSO, climate change, climate modeling, and greenhouse warming. Potential solutions to problems explored. Presented in seminar format and includes journal paper discussion and evaluation, writing opinion papers on controversial atmospheric issues, group projects, class presentations, and a term paper. Interrelationships among the various atmospheric problems are emphasized.

GEO542 Land-Use Regulations (3 crs.)

Provides student with knowledge of the components of community level land use regulations. The following community level system components are examined: comprehensive plan, zoning ordinance, subdivision regulations, taxation, other minor land acquisition techniques.

GEO545 Image Processing of Remotely Sensed Data (3 crs.)

Microcomputer processing of remotely sensed data in digital format forms the primary focus. Each student has numerous hands-on computer experiences in extraction and selection of multiband pixel data from satellite platforms. Image processing and enhancement techniques emphasized. Supervised and unsupervised classification strategies performed on numerous data sets extracted from selected regions of the world. Students utilize the broad based data sets for more specific applications research.

GEO546 Geoenvironmental Research I (3 crs.)

Research course to be worked out with member of the geography-earth science department.

GEO548 Geoenvironmental Research II (3 crs.)

Research course to be worked out with member of the geography-earth science department.

GEO594 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

GEO599 Independent Study (3 crs.)

GEO609 Internship I (3 crs.)

Provides opportunity to practice geoenvironmental theory and concepts as an observer and participant in the process. Placement on a limited basis with consulting firms and state and local governments enhances the student's preparation in the field.

GEO610 Internship II (3 crs.)

Provides opportunity to practice geoenvironmental theory and concepts as an observer and participant in the process. Placement on a limited basis with consulting firms and state and local governments enhances the student's preparation in the field.

GEO612 Thesis I (3 crs.)

GEO613 Thesis II (3 crs.)

German (GER)

GER101 Beginning German I (3 crs.)

Designed for students who have never studied the language before. Both textbook and authentic materials used to enable students to express themselves on personalized topics.

GER102 Beginning German II (3 crs.)

Continuation of GER101. Both textbook and authentic materials used to enable students to express themselves on a variety of topics concerning self, family, and friends. Prerequisite: GER101 or placement.

GER103 Intermediate German (3 crs.)

Continuation of GER102. Both textbook and authentic materials used to enable students to express themselves on a variety of topics concerning self, family, friends, and their communities. Reading, writing, listening, and speaking are combined to explore the history, geography, music, arts, and film of German-speaking society. Prerequisite: GER102 or placement.

GER150 German Civilization and Culture (3 crs.)

Stresses the culture, the social and artistic factors which have contributed to the evolvement of the civilization and culture of German-speaking peoples. Examines trends in world history that had an impact on the cultural development of Austria, Germany, and Switzerland. Taught in English.

GER151 German Cinema (3 crs.)

Survey of the cinematographic production of the German-speaking countries from the 1920s until today. Works of movements like the expressionists, the new German cinema, or of individual filmmakers like Murnau, Pabst, Riefenstahl, Fassbinder, and Herzog will be analyzed. Acquaints students of all disciplines with the cultural and societal perspectives found in the German-speaking world: Austria, Germany, and Switzerland.

GER203 Intermediate German Conversation (3 crs.)

Consists of material designed to develop proficiency in the speaking and writing of everyday German. May be taken concurrently with GER103 with permission of the department. Prerequisite: GER103 or department placement.

GER204 Ideas and Cultures from the German-Speaking World (3 crs.)

Introduction to comparative cultural studies of the German-speaking world. Introduces the traditions, the diverse manifestations, and the richness of Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Liechtenstein, and will present the relevant moments of Germany's presence in the world. Prerequisite: GER103 or department placement.

GER215 German for the Professions (3 crs.)

Emphasizes skills in communication in the daily world of business, health professions, social work, law enforcement, etc. May include techniques of translation, a study of the economic and business systems in the German-speaking world, and extensive practice in using forms and expressions frequently used in correspondence of the above mentioned professions. Content may be adapted to students' needs. Prerequisite: GER200, GER203 or permission of instructor.

GER309 German Phonetics (3 crs.)

Presents a careful analysis of the sounds of German. Provides an introduction to the principles of phonetics combined with intensive drills in the pronunciation of standard German (in terms of accent, intonation, and stress). Special attention paid to the identification and correction of individual pronunciation errors. Prerequisite: GER203, GER204 or permission of instructor.

GER312 German Grammar (3 crs.)

Presents a thorough review of finer details in the structure of the German language. Students will be trained in the use of grammatically correct German through extensive oral and written practice. Prerequisite: GER203, GER204 or permission of instructor.

GER313 Advanced Composition and Stylistics (3 crs.)

Provides an intensive examination of elements of style in German. Emphasizes the writing of correct German with a view to avoiding Anglicisms in syntax and vocabulary. Prerequisite: GER203, GER204 or permission of instructor.

GER320 Berlin (3 crs.)

Analyzes the sociological, political, and historical significance of the concept of metropolis in Germany. Provides a survey of the history of the German capital and its culture. Literature, film, and paintings by some of the major citizens of Berlin will be analyzed. Upper-level class taught in German. Content will vary depending on the instructor. Prerequisite: GER103, GER203, GER204 or permission of the instructor.

GER322 Readings in 19th and 20th Century German Literature (3 crs.)

Studies principal authors and literary movements from Realism to the present, with particular emphasis on such writers as Storm, Hauptmann, Mann, Hesse, Brecht, Böll, Grass. Prerequisite: GER203, GER204 or permission of instructor.

GER390 German Internship (3 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

GER400 German Seminar (3 crs.)

Focuses on an intensive study of special linguistic problems of a particular period or literary movement; or individual works of an important author. May be taken more than once, provided a specific topic is not repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

GER490 Selected Topics in German (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Gerontology (GRN)

GRN100 Introduction to Gerontology (3 crs.)

Provides basic knowledge about gerontology from biological, psychological, and social perspectives, with an emphasis on examining aging among diverse groups. Traditional topics include physical and mental health aspects of aging, work and retirement in later life, and an overview of aging in special populations.

GRN301 Gerontology Internship (3 crs.)

Provides an off-campus, professional learning experience in the field of aging. Contact the program director for information.

GRN303 Gerontology Internship II

Provides additional off campus, professional learning experience in the field of aging. Contact the program director for information.

GRN391 Selected Topics in Gerontology (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of program minor not covered by the regular courses.

GRN480 Valuing Diversity in Later Life (3 crs.)

Examines the unique experiences of aging among various racial, ethnic, and cultural groups, with an emphasis on assessing needs and identifying strengths.

GRN481 Reflecting on the Impact of Gender in Later Life (3 crs.)

Explores the unique experiences of aging women and men with an emphasis on overcoming discrimination and stereotypes to promote improved quality of life.

GRN482 Using Spirituality to Promote Optimal Aging (3 crs.)

Examines the powerful influence of religion and spirituality in the lives of elders, including ways of working with beliefs and religious systems to improve service delivery.

GRN483 Using Applied Statistics in Gerontology Professions (3 crs.)

Provides necessary skills to apply, understand, and critically evaluate the unique outcomes of research designs involving older adults.

GRN484 Evaluating Gerontology Programs, Services, and Products (3 crs.)

Engages students in applied research including the evaluation of existing aging-related social service programs and for-profit services and products aimed at the older adult market, with an emphasis on the use of qualitative methods.

GRN491 Advanced Selected Topics in Gerontology (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer advanced courses in areas of program minor not covered by the regular courses.

GRN510 Foundations of Applied Gerontology I: The Social Context of Aging (3 crs.)

Provides an in-depth overview of the field of aging for diverse career professionals with an emphasis on understanding issues important to elders today such as economics, social relationships, and the importance of advocacy.

GRN511 Foundations of Applied Gerontology II: Cognitive Aging, Mental Health, and Wellness (3 crs.)

Examines individual differences in later life including personality, memory and cognition, and the social psychology of aging, with an emphasis on geriatric assessment and application of findings that promote positive aging.

GRN512 Foundations of Applied Gerontology III: Biological Aging, Physical Health, and Wellness (3 crs.)

Students will examine the biological and physiological dimensions of health and wellness of older adults with an emphasis on distinguishing normal (i.e., healthy) aging versus pathological (i.e., disease) processes in later life and on applying interventions to achieve optimal fitness in later life.

GRN520 Thinking Critically for Gerontology Professionals (3 crs.)

Provides students with the skills necessary to understand and critically evaluate aging research, with an emphasis on applying results to real world issues.

GRN610 Advancing Social & Public Policy in Gerontology (3 crs.)

Examines the impact of aging and health care public policy (e.g., Medicare, Social Security) on the social service delivery system, with an emphasis on improving the social, economic, and physical environments of elders.

GRN621 Creating Successful Models of Aging (3 crs.)

Students will examine model theories, programs and services for seniors, with an emphasis on revision and adaptation for career-specific use.

GRN640 Attracting & Keeping Older Clientele (3 crs.)

Focuses on issues important to the business professional including the economics of aging, social policy, marketing techniques, and applied market research design.

GRN641 Managing an Older Workforce (3 crs.)

Focuses on issues and skills important to the effective management of an aging workforce including hiring, performance evaluation, training, retraining, and leadership.

GRN650 Applied Projects & Research in Aging (3 crs.)

Students choose one of two options depending on career goals: 1) applied internship placement that focuses on working with and/or advocating for older adults; or 2) complete a formal thesis with a gerontology theme with the goal of preparing for advanced graduate level work.

GRN651 Integrating Gerontology into Professional Careers (3 crs.)

Capstone course provides an in-depth analysis of serving older clients/consumers with an opportunity to integrate previously learned material in an individually tailored applied project.

GRN690 Learning Something New: Advanced Selected Topics in Aging (3 crs.)

Students will have the opportunity to study concepts and applications in the area of diverse aging individuals not covered by regular graduate coursework (to be taught by interdisciplinary faculty over summer terms).

Health Care Administration (HCA)

All Health Care Administration courses are only offered in Gettysburg or Harrisburg.

HCA400 Introduction to Health Care Systems (3 crs.)

Introduces the major components of the health care system in the United States, including governmental, for profit, and not-for-profit organizations. Discusses the influence of social, political, and economic forces on the delivery of health care. Examines current problems facing the health care industry and evaluates alternative programs from other nations.

HCA451 Legal Aspects of Health Care (3 crs.)

Examines the federal and state regulation of health care providers, focusing primarily on hospitals, nursing homes, physicians, and insurers. Reviews general principles of liability and confidentiality for health care providers. Assesses issues associated with the introduction of medical evidence and testimony. Evaluates the role of the legal system in cases involving all aspects of the human life cycle, ranging from conception to the end of life. Prerequisite: HCA400.

HCA452 Health Care Financial Management (3 crs.)

Examines the most used tools and techniques of health care financial management including health care accounting and financial statements; managing cash, billings, and collections; making major capital investments; determining cost and using cost information in decision-making; budgeting and performance measurement; and pricing. Prerequisite: HCA400.

HCA453 Human Resources Management for Health Care Professionals (3 crs.)

Examines the development and functions of human resources management in the context of public, private, and not-for-profit health care settings including hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, and continuing care retirement communities among others. Evaluates the roles of management and the functional specialist in the development and implementation of personnel policy and administration. Emphasizes the impact of American culture and public policy upon the human resources and industrial relations functions. Prerequisite: HCA400.

HCA454 Health Care Strategic Management (3 crs.)

Explores the determinants of organizational survival and success. Assesses the need to achieve a fit between the internal and external environment. Analyzes cases to examine environmental and competitive issues. Prerequisite: HCA400.

HCA485 Independent Research in Health Care Administration (1-6 crs.)

Students do in-depth research in an area of health care that interests them. The project will demonstrate the student's ability to do independent research, culminating in a well-written report. Contact the research coordinator of the department for further information. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

HCA490 Selected Topics in Health Care Administration (3 crs.)

Provides the opportunity for the department to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

HCA498 Internship in Health Care Administration (1-3 crs.)

Students broaden their knowledge of health care administration by participating in an internship. Contact the internship coordinator of the department for further information. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

HCA499 Internship in Health Care Administration (1-3 crs.)

Students broaden their knowledge of health care administration by participating in an internship. Contact the internship coordinator of the department for further information. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.

History (HIS)

HIS105 World History I (3 crs.)

Surveys the development of human cultures from their Paleolithic origins through the formation of early agrarian societies and their growth to major world systems by 1500. Major themes include biological and environmental relationships, economic and social systems, states and empires, and artistic, philosophical, and religious traditions.

HIS106 World History II (3 crs.)

Continues HIS105 with emphasis on growing interaction among world societies since 1500. Major themes include industrialization and changes in modern political power relations and ideologies, environments, and social structures. Prerequisite: Usually taken following HIS105.

HIS201 Early History of the United States (3 crs.)

Traces the major social, political, and cultural themes of American history from the initial contacts among Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans through the Civil War.

HIS202 Recent History of the United States (3 crs.)

Examines the social, political, and economic currents of American history since the Civil War. Emphasizes changes taking place in agriculture, labor, urban society, social relations, and industry.

HIS203 Theory and Practice of History (3 crs.)

Covers briefly the history of the discipline. Introduces historiographical issues, methodology, and the craft of argumentation; includes library skills, the use of computers, analysis of professional historians' research. Hands-on approach provides opportunities to work with primary sources (documents, oral sources, quantitative data, visual/material evidence). Seminar with discussion, oral presentations, written exercises, and a major paper or project. Usually taken during sophomore year.

HIS301 The West in American History (3 crs.)

Studies the history and significance of the continuously advancing West in the development of the United States and present day life in America. Frontier society and migration are included is the importance of the American frontier on the nation's history. Prerequisite: One course in American history.

HIS302 American Economic History (3 crs.)

Analyzes growth of the American economy from the colonial era through the development of 20th century corporate capitalism. Particular emphasis placed on role of labor technology, innovation, and capital in the process of industrialization. Prerequisite: HIS201, HIS202, or permission of instructor.

HIS304 American Diplomatic History (3 crs.)

Studies U.S. foreign relations from colonial times to present and the factors which influenced them (e.g., the psychological outlook, the aims and the policies of the decision makers; public opinion; domestic and international politics; geography, and technology). Prerequisite: HIS201 or HIS202 or permission of instructor.

HIS305 The Civil War Era (3 crs.)

Studies the background, development and results of sectional rivalries between northern and southern sections of the United States. The war and its aftermath are considered from political, military, economic, and sociological points of view. Prerequisite: HIS201 is recommended but not mandatory.

HIS306 History of the South as a Region: 1815 to Present (3 crs.)

Studies the social, economic and political forces in the 19th and 20th century South. Factors that made the South a distinctive part of the American nation are considered and emphasis given to the international conflict and the problems and the progress of the New South. Prerequisite: One course in American history.

HIS307 Contemporary U. S. History since 1945 (3 crs.)

Stresses recent economic, social, and cultural developments of the American people. Traces the growth of the city and the development in our economy and deals with the diverse effects of these forces upon American life and thought. Prerequisite: HIS201 or HIS202 or permission of instructor.

HIS309 History of the American Worker (3 crs.)

Covers the historical development of the American working class between the 18th and 20th centuries. Readings focus on the process of unionization and the relationship between industrial workers and the social, educational, political, and economic life in America.

HIS314 History of Jacksonian America (3 crs.)

Analyzes the social, intellectual, political, economic, and religious events, trends, issues, and problems in American life from the 1810s until the 1850s.

HIS318 History of U.S. Women (3 crs.)

Focuses upon historical factors that shaped the lives of American women in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. Changing standards of behavior, expectations of marriage and family, and options of work outside the home will be explored, as well as women's demands for equality in education, careers, and citizenship. Women's differing experiences based on race, ethnicity, religion, region, social class, and age will be discussed.

HIS320 Europe in the Early and High Middle Ages: 300 to 1270 (3 crs.)

Surveys the important political, economic and cultural developments in Europe from the time of the late Roman Empire to the end of the crusading movement. Special emphasis on the great cultural achievements of the 11th through the 13th centuries. Prerequisite: HIS105 or permission of instructor.

HIS321 Late Medieval Europe: 1270 to 1517 (3 crs.)

Examines the decline of medieval civilization and the emergence of the modern, with particular emphasis upon growth of the modern state, the Italian and northern renaissances, and the crises of the Catholic Church in the 14th and 15th centuries. Prerequisite: HIS105 or permission of instructor.

HIS325 History of the Tsarist Russia (3 crs.)

Studies the development of the Tsarist system (1462-1917) and of the 1917 Russian revolutions. Major attention focused on tsars, clergy, nobles, bureaucrats, intelligentsia, and peasantry in terms of their character, relations, institutions, and beliefs. Special concern given to causes of the 1917 revolutions and the legacy of pre-Soviet Russia. Prerequisite: HIS105, HIS106, or permission of instructor.

HIS326 History of the U.S.S.R. (3 crs.)

Considers the history of modern Russia in three phases: a study of the basic aspects of Marxist-Leninist ideology; chronological coverage of the history of Soviet Russia from the 1917 revolution to the present; and a study of conditions within present-day Russia and her relations with the rest of the world. Prerequisite: HIS105, HIS106, or permission of instructor.

HIS330 History of Modern Germany: 1919 to Present (3 crs.)

Survey of German history from the end of World War I to the present, emphasizing social and political developments. Particular attention paid to the dissolution of the Weimar Republic and the establishment of the National Socialist totalitarian state. Prerequisite: HIS106 or GER150 or permission of instructor.

HIS331 History of Modern France: 1750 to Present (3 crs.)

Examined origins and course of the French Revolution and assesses the consequences for social, economic, institutional, political, and intellectual trends. These themes then are followed through successive revolutions, wars, and governmental changes down to the present. Prerequisite: HIS105 and HIS106 or permission of instructor.

HIS332 English History: 1066 to Present (3 crs.)

Surveys British history from the Norman Conquest to the late 20th century, emphasizing the unique character of English institutional and social developments. Major topics include growth of common law and Parliament, the changes in institutions and religion during the Tudor-Stuart era, the impact of the Industrial Revolution, the acquisition and evolution of empire, and the role of Great Britain in the 20th century. Prerequisite: HIS105 and HIS106.

HIS338 Colonial America (3 crs.)

Explores changing patterns of life in North America from the late 15th century to the mid-18th century. Themes examined include the European exploration and settlement of the Americas, the demographic and ecological consequences of colonization, and the development of distinct regional cultures in colonial America.

HIS341 African-American History (3 crs.)

Traces the experiences of African-Americans from the early colonial period to the present while emphasizing the following themes: the formation of a racial identity among diverse African-Americans, the rise of slavery and abolitionism, the struggles of African-Americans after the Civil War, and the evolution of 20th century civil rights movements.

HIS342 U.S. Immigration and Ethnicity (3 crs.)

Examines the history of immigration and ethnicity in the United States between 1820 and 1980. Traces processes, politics, and cultures of new Americans with special emphasis on legal barriers to full citizenship. Focus on gender relations and the experiences of recent ethnics included.

HIS344 Modern Middle East: 1500 to Present (3 crs.)

Surveys the modern Middle East from 1500 to present. Investigates how the world was transformed by the rise of Islam as a guiding force within some of the most powerful and stable empires, like the Ottoman and Saffavid Empires, in history. Discusses in some depth the impact of colonialism and the rise of nationalist movements. Major emphasis placed on contemporary issues: the Iranian Revolution, Iraq-Iranian War, Arab-Israeli Conflict, the Palestinian Question, and the problems of national development in the area.

HIS345 Military History of the United States (3 crs.)

Studies the military history of the United States by placing the American military within the larger context of the changing economic, technological, social, and intellectual environment of the United States of which environment the American military is a product and extension.

HIS348 History of the Ancient World (3 crs.)

Survey of the political, social, and cultural institutions of the Near East, Greece, and Rome, with special emphasis upon the contributions of each to the civilization of the following periods. Prerequisites: HIS105, HIS106, or permission of the instructor.

HIS349 History of Latin America (3 crs.)

Surveys the history of Latin America from the pre-Columbian civilization to the present with emphasis on the social, cultural, political, and economic themes that explain the present problems and potentials of the continent. Prerequisite: HIS106 or permission of instructor.

HIS350 History of Modern Japan (3 crs.)

Deals with the evolution of traditional Japanese social, economic, and political institutions. Impact of rapid modernization on these institutions and the transformation of Japan into a world power will be the major themes of this course. Japan's re-emergence as an economic and political force in Asia since World War II examined. Prerequisite: HIS105 recommended.

HIS351 World History since 1945 (3 crs.)

Examines the major events and key developments that have occurred since World War II. Course is global in scope and particular emphasis is placed on the interrelationships that have come to characterize the entire world's events and institutions since 1945. Prerequisites: HIS105 and HIS106.

HIS352 The US and Vietnam (3 crs.)

Begins with an overview of pre-colonial Vietnam, examines the motives and consequences of 19th and 20th century French colonialism to 1954, and finally analyzes the American war in Vietnam and its impact on both Vietnam and the United States.

HIS353 Modern Southeast Asia (3 crs.)

Provides an understanding of modern Southeast Asian history from the early 1500s through the post-colonial period. After a brief introduction to Southeast Asia's early history, the main themes explored are nature and impact European colonization, growth of nationalist resistance movements and the subsequent emergence of modern nation states. Concludes by addressing the main issues confronting post-colonial Southeast Asia.

HIS354 Traditional China (3 crs.)

Surveys China's history from ancient to early modern times (ca. 1600) by investigating major developments in Chinese society, political systems, economy, and culture. Prerequisite: HIS105.

HIS355 History of Modern China (3 crs.)

Concerned with the evolution of traditional Chinese institutions and philosophies. Decline of the imperial system examined from the point of view of internal disintegration and external aggression. Course then traces development of nationalist movements in China since 1911 and describe the impact of the KMT-CCP Civil War to 1950. China's emergence as a world power examined. Prerequisite: HIS105 is recommended.

HIS360 History of Mexico (3 crs.)

Surveys Mexican history from pre-conquest to the present. Major topics include the Spanish Colonialism, the Mexican Revolution, and Mexico's present cultural and economic influence within Latin America. Prerequisite: HIS106 or permission of instructor.

HIS366 History of Brazil (3 crs.)

Surveys Brazilian development from the Colonial to the Modern era including an examination of Portuguese conquest and control, the monarchy, industrialization, the influence of minorities, and the literature and arts. Prerequisite: HIS106 or permission of instructor.

HIS376 History of Africa South of the Sahara (3 crs.)

Surveys sub-Saharan African history beginning with brief introduction to pre-colonial history. Emphasis on the colonial period beginning with the Berlin Conference of 1885 and the post-colonial era. Historical periods studied include pre-colonial history up to the 14th century, exploration age up to 1885, colonial development to 1945, and post-World War II Africa. Prerequisites: HIS105 and HIS106.

HIS381 Modern South Asia: 1500 to Present (3 crs.)

Traces the emergence of modern South Asian from 1500 to present. First half focuses on selected major themes such as the unity and diversity in Hindu religious tradition and culture, the institution of the caste, the emergence of centralized empires, and advent of Islam and its impact on the South Asia. Second half concentrates on the gradual transformation of the British East India Company from a trading company to an imperial power, the construction of Indian nationalism, social and economic changes in Indian society as a result of imposition of colonial rule, and the development of independent nation states of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh.

HIS387 History Internship (3 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

HIS389 History Internship (3 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

HIS391 History Internship (3-6 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

HIS393 Selected Topics in History (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

HIS397 Seminar in Comparative History (3 crs.)

Examines themes common across world civilizations from c. 1000 to the present and considers their development in specific cultural settings. Although specific states or world regions may be considered, readings are broadly comparative and intended to form a synthesis of discrete national or regional histories. Includes a writing requirement. Usually taken during the senior year. Prerequisite: HIS203.

HIS402 Revolutionary America (3 crs.)

Explores the fundamental changes in American life during the 18th century and their culmination in the American Revolution. Analyzes those themes within the conceptual framework of the modernization of traditional societies and in the context of broader Western and American developments.

HIS407 Women in Comparative Perspective (3 crs.)

Topical exploration of female experiences in selected global cultures. How different societies have constructed gender (or defined the social meaning of being a woman) over time explored in a comparative perspective. Intellectual discourses of religion, education, and politics structure cultural comparisons of women's work, their position within the family, attitudes toward sexuality, civil rights, and access to public power. Through readings, discussions, films, and occasional lectures the class examines the historical development of modern gender conventions in various world regions and of controversies about the human rights of women.

HIS410 The Islamic World (3 crs.)

Explores the many contours of the Islamic World from 600 to 1500 CE, focusing on Islam as a religion and as an organizing principle of many diverse societies. Examines how politics, warfare, society, and cultures developed in the Islamic World. Includes pre-Islamic Arabia, the rise of Islam, Arab expansion and adaptation, nomadic-urban encounters, and development of socio-political institutions, religious sects, and cultural-scientific achievements.

HIS413 Pennsylvania History (3 crs.)

Deals with development of Pennsylvania from the eve of European settlement to the present. Attention given to political, economic, and social trends and institutions from the 17th through the 20th centuries. Pennsylvania's role in national and international history also studied.

HIS418 Introduction to Applied History (3 crs.)

Explores the practical application of historical skills and practices in a variety of settings (including business, government, and historical institutions such as museums, historic sites, archives, and historical societies), and the issues historians face when they preserve, interpret, and present the past to the general public. Through hands-on experience, students examine areas such as archive and manuscript curating, historical editing, oral history, material culture studies, museums, historic preservation, historical media production, and history on the World Wide Web. Special emphasis placed on the financial, legal, ethical, political, and interpretive issues faces by historians presenting the past to diverse audiences.

HIS419 Advanced Topics in Public History (3 crs.)

Provides intensive examination of some of the specialized historical methods used by historians working for museums, historic sites, historical societies, government agencies, and other types of historical organizations. Emphasis may be on one or more of the following: oral history, local history, material culture studies, historical editing, historic preservation, or museum studies. Students gain hands-on experience by designing and executing significant public history projects and by conducting historical fieldwork.

HIS423 Issues in 20th-Century Europe (3 crs.)

Chronological and topical study of political, economic, social, and intellectual trends of our era. Modern wars, the struggle between authoritarianism and democracy, the East-West split, and the European economic community are major themes.

HIS428 Issues in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era (3 crs.)

Covers political, economic, social, and intellectual aspects of the Progressive Movement, tracing its origins in the 19th century and showing how progressivism was a part of the background of the New Deal. Special attention given to the all-important transition of the concept of liberalism from laissez-faire individualism to state regulation. Emphasis placed upon the differing interpretations of the Progressive Movement which have been developed by various historians.

HIS430 U.S. Cultural History (3 crs.)

Focuses upon significant cultural developments in American History, and upon the importance of culture to major trends and events in the U.S. past. Course addresses cultural theory, definitions of culture, multiculturalism in history, and the roles of culture and communication in the interpretation of history. Individual subjects covered each semester will include some combination of the following: mass media (including radio, television, print), folklore, religion, material culture, and performance culture.

HIS433 Oral History (3 crs.)

Introduces students to methods and uses of oral history. Students learn to analyze and use oral history sources, and will practice oral history protocols including the conduct of recorded interviews, the storage of oral history recordings, and the transcription of oral history interviews. Students will also be introduced to alternative uses for oral history including audio and video documentary, and digital methods of exhibition. Prerequisite: HIS203.

HIS454 China and the Outside World (3 crs.)

Investigates China's relations with the outside world during its pre-modern history. Since China is somewhat geographically isolated from the rest of Eurasia, historians have tended to assume Chinese civilization is mostly the product of indigenous developments. The course challenges this assumption by looking at how China and people outside of its borders have influenced each other.

HIS490 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

HIS494 Introduction to Archives (3 crs.)

Introduces the nature of archives and concepts of archival administration. Stresses relationship of archives to other kinds of documentary materials, and surveys basic archival activity. Examines state, local, business, labor, university, and church archives and defines the problems of these specialized archives.

HIS499 Historiography (3 crs.)

Traces development of historical consciousness from classical antiquity down through the use of scientific history in the late 19th century. Further analyzes the intellectual foundations, social purposes, and methods of contemporary, (i.e., 20th century) historical inquiry. Prerequisite: Nine credits in history or permission of instructor.

HIS512 Seminar in Comparative Labor History (3 crs.)

Compares history of the working classes and labor movements in various countries including those in the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia. Explores the ways workers as producers and citizens intervened to shape the course of the industrial world, and the evolving role of the state in the contested relationships of workers and employers, and cross-cultural patterns of protest and change. Emphasizes the role of gender and race in labor issues.

HIS513 Seminar in U.S. Women's History (3 crs.)

Explores topics and themes pertinent to shaping the past experience of American women, including personal, property, and political rights; ideologies of gender; rural and urban work; education; class, race, and ethnicity; social policy; and sexuality. Readings and discussion in the seminar focus on both empirical and theoretical literature of the field.

HIS514 Population in History (3 crs.)

History of Western (European and American) populations and family structures in relation to changing economic, social, and ecological factors during the era of modernization, i.e., the 17th through the 19th centuries. Also searches for principles applicable to contemporary Third World population problems. Prerequisite: HIS106 or HIS202 or permission of instructor.

HIS515 Seminar in 20th Century U.S. Social History (3 crs.)

Reviews United States history since 1945 through the topical approach. Problems such as internationalism, civil rights, extremism, and comparable topics are considered as they reflect the impact of the assumption of world leadership and responsibility on traditional American concepts, ideals, and values.

HIS516 Seminar in African American History (3 crs.)

Deals with the experience of the black man in America from colonial times to the present. Origins and developments of white attitudes toward black Americans and the origin and development of the attitude of blacks emphasized. Students examine topically and in-depth attitude development, slavery, segregation, the Civil Rights movement, and the contribution of black leaders to American life. Prerequisites: HIS201 and HIS202 or permission of instructor.

HIS519 Seminar in International Relations (3 crs.)

Treats United States diplomatic history from 1914 to the present. Considers interpretations of major diplomatic events such as American entry into World War I, World War II, the Cold War, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War, as well as peacemaking at Versailles, Yalta, and other negotiated settlements. Also develops dominant themes in United States diplomacy, including foreign economic interests, Caribbean intervention, isolationism, collective security, the nuclear arms race and disarmament.

HIS525 Seminar in U.S. Regional History (3 crs.)

Introduction into the major historiographical issues and research methods of regional and local U.S. history. Focuses attention on questions of regional identity and themes of the relationship between region and nation, and the relationship between region and world. Trains students in analyzing regional and local primary sources. Alternates emphasis between the American West and the American South.

HIS526 Seminar in the Civil War Era (3 crs.)

Considers new and old interpretations regarding this political watershed's coming and consequences (roughly 1830 to 1880), emphasizing social, cultural, and political perspectives.

HIS532 20th Century Europe (3 crs.)

Intensively studies critical themes in European History between 1914 and the present. Topics investigated include imperialism, domestic politics, culture and society, international relations, gender, the evolution of Russia and the USSR, as well as the legacies of World I and World War II.

HIS534 Seminar in Modern German History (3 crs.)

Analysis of critical issues in German history since 1871, with emphasis on the period since 1919. Particular emphasis given to collapse of the Weimer Republic and Hitler's dictatorship.

HIS535 Seminar in Medieval Studies (3 crs.)

Focuses upon the reading and interpretation of various writings of the Early Middle Ages as well as secondary accounts dealing with the age which have come to be recognized as standard works in the field. The selection of works affords a coverage of the economic, political, philosophical, religious, and literary aspects of the period.

HIS558 Seminar in East Asia and the Modern World (3 crs.)

A comparative look at major themes in the histories of China and Japan from earliest times to the present. Premodern topics include prehistory, the development of state Confucianism, the spread of Buddhism, roles of scholars and warriors, the impact of Inner Asia, political decentralization, gender, and peasant society. Includes study of how traditional cultures have been transformed as a result of contact with the West since the 19th century.

HIS594 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

HIS598 Independent Study (3 crs.)

HIS599 Readings in History (3-6 crs.)

Opportunity for independent readings in an area of special interest to the student of history, such as the major field of American, European, and non-Western history, including political, economic, social, intellectual and cultural developments. Prerequisites: permission of the department and instructor.

HIS600 Computerized Historical research Methods (3 crs.)

Seminar in historical research techniques, analysis of source materials, and preparation of a research paper. Students expected to perform research and prepare and present a model seminar paper. Emphasizes the important role electronic resources have assumed in basic historical research methods. Students should schedule this course as early as possible in the program.

HIS601 Research in Local and Regional History (3 crs.)

Intensive study and hands-on research of micro regions or localities defined by their natural geographic, economic, or cultural characteristics. Course examines the theoretical and methodical issues of local and regional historical research and then has students apply those concerns in the intensive study of two or more localities. Students are required to complete a research paper demonstrating mastery of the techniques of local and regional historical research.

HIS609 Internship I (3 crs.)

HIS610 Internship II (3 crs.)

HIS612 Thesis I (3 crs.)

HIS613 Thesis II (3 crs.)

Honors (HON)

HON396 University Honors Colloquim (3 crs.)

Capstone course for the University Honors Program. Utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to explore a theme. Students complete research and service learning projects on the theme from the perspective of their discipline. Students present their projects at the University Honors Symposium.

Human Communication Studies (HCS)

HCS100 Introduction to Human Communication (3 crs.)

Overview highlighting four aspects of human communication general theoretical overview of historical aspects and current models, small group and leadership dimensions of human communication, interpersonal communication, and public speaking strategies. Emphasis on developing student sensitivity to and understanding of the necessity to adapt one's communication styles to various environmental and sociological communication situations.

HCS200 Human Communication Theory (3 crs.)

Fundamental examination of human communication from a theoretical perspective. Included are explorations into theories of the processes, myths, effects, ethics, and criticism of this pervasive phenomenon. Students analyze interpersonal, group, public, cultural, gender-based, and mass communication theories to discover how they become vital to explaining daily living and interactions. Students begin to understand the underpinnings of theories that are the foundation and guidelines of the discipline. Prerequisites: HCS100 Intro to Human Communication with a C or better and declared human communication major or minor.

HCS210 Public Speaking (3 crs.)

Emphasizes the preparation and delivery of speeches to mass audiences. Advanced instruction is given and practice provided in logical organization of the speech and analysis of the audience, the speaker, the occasion, and the topic. Prerequisites: HCS200 Human Communication Theory with a C or better and a declared major or minor in Human Communication.

HCS220 Nonverbal Communication (3 crs.)

Designed to familiarize the primary concepts and the body of literature relating to nonverbal communication. Approached from a theoretical examination relating to the spatial, temporal, vocal, kinesic, occulesic, and olfactic constructs of nonverbal communication. Will acquire an understanding of nonverbal cues and how they impact communication interactions. Students can also improve speaking and listening abilities by understanding how nonverbal actions affect communication with others.

HCS230 Small Group Communication (3 crs.)

Experiential perspective, combining theory and practice, into the study of group experiences. Topics include group formation, decision-making, roles and leadership, conflict, risky shift, and groupthink. Students gain understanding and build skills through practical application of these topics. Prerequisites: HCS200 Human Communication Theory with a C or better and declared human communication major or minor.

HCS240 Interviewing (3 crs.)

Practical approach to the information exchange process. Students participate in information-gathering/giving interviews, job placement interviews for both applicant and employer, survey interviews as a way of gathering research data, problem-solving interviews, persuasive interviews, performance evaluation interviews, and medical and counseling interviews. Emphasis on the strategies of writing quality questions, analysis of data, and appropriate responses to questions. Students also learn to write effective letters of application, resumes, and follow-up correspondence. Prerequisites: HCS200 Human Communication Theory with a C or better.

HCS250 Interpersonal Communication (3 crs.)

Balanced survey of theories on dyadic transactions with ongoing application and exercises. Critical thinking skills developed through discussion and application of significant theories. Will explore topics, in depth, through article presentations, individual research, and case studies. A dynamic, interactive course; students expected to engage in participation and discussion. Prerequisites: HCS200 Human Communication Theory with a C or better.

HCS260 Computer-Mediated Communication (3 crs.)

A twofold approach to computer technology and its impact on human communication: discussion and familiarization, both cognitively and experientially, with the various forms of computer-mediated communication; and creation and application of some basic CMC instruments such as basic HTML, the webpage, the web form, the listserv, and the discussion bulletin board.

HCS270 Intergroup/Intercultural Communication (3 crs.)

Investigates the process by which we acquire, manage, and execute those cultural qualities, patterns of thinking, values, assumptions, and concepts which constitute our subjective cultural experience. A primary objective is for students to improve their interactive skills and develop sensitivity toward individuals of other cultural groups and sub-groups.

HCS280 Professional Communication (3 crs.)

Performance course designed to improve and polish student speaking and writing skills for effective communication in professional settings. Speaking component emphasizes structure, audience adaptation, style of presentation, and the use of presentational technologies. Writing component emphasizes writing of professional correspondence, business reports, and executive summaries. Successful completion indicates students have demonstrated high levels of skill in the development and execution of both oral and written communication which are appropriate for the workplace. Prerequisites: HCS200 Human Communication Theory, HCS210 Public Speaking, and ENG101 College Writing with a C or better.

HCS305 Communication for Training and Instruction (3 crs.)

Opportunity to examine how communication is the tool for imparting knowledge and understanding in educational and training environments. Cornerstone activity will analyze, understand, and employ learning theory to prepare a training program. Prerequisites: HCS200 Human Communication and HCS280 Professional Communication with a C or better.

HCS310 African-American Communication (3 crs.)

Examination of body of oral discourses, styles, and traditions of African-Americans. Students will discover a foundation for understanding the nature and power of the spoken word, develop appreciation for communication theory, through the rhetoric of resistance, to the human communication of oppression, and explore Afrocentric communication theory and African-American rhetoric.

HCS325 The Rhetoric of African-American Struggle and Progress (3 crs.)

Emphasizes bibliographical-historical-critical analyses of significant speeches, lyrics, and other artifacts by African-American men and women. Students will examine artifacts from slave narratives, the antebellum period, Civil Rights, Black Power Struggle, and the present. Included are public addresses and artifacts by Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, W. E. B. Dubois, Booker T. Washington, Angela Davis, Malcolm X, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Jessie Jackson, Al Sharpton, Tupac Shukur, Public Enemy and others.

HCS333 Communicating Identity (3 crs.)

Examination of identity from the standpoint of human communication, which maintains that identity is (in)formed and (re)produced through communication. Addresses the difficulty of defining identity and examines theoretical explanations of identity in order to understand how features of identity (including sex/gender, race/ethnicity, age, and sexual orientation) are communicated interpersonally, in groups, and in mass media. Conducted as a seminar. Prerequisites: HCS200 Human Communication Theory and HCS250 Interpersonal Communication with a C or better.

HCS335 Popular Culture and Gender Construction (3 crs.)

Examination of impact of different forms of popular culture including cinema, television, popular music, fashion, and sports. Based on various cultural studies frameworks, students explore how these forms construct gender ideals and how those ideals can be challenged.

HCS340 Gender and Communication (3 crs.)

Assessment of gender, as a social construction, that influences our perception of other people's behavior in our everyday interactions. Investigates the division of males and females into separate gender categories (the masculine and the feminine spheres) and how this division becomes the basis for the gender roles our society prescribes.

HCS350 Theories of Organizational Communication (3 crs.)

Combines theory and application. Theoretically, students analyze different perspectives on organizational theory; communication, relationships, and media within the organization; dynamics of organizational culture; and strategic communication and public relations. In terms of application, students analyze real-life case studies of organizational communication, and develop and simulate resolutions to the cases.

HCS360 Research Methods in Communication (3 crs.)

Divided into three units: An overview of ethical practices in scientific approaches; an examination of survey designs for quantitative analysis; and an examination of qualitative research methods. Students learn SPSS, in order to perform statistical analysis of data (t-tests, ANOVA, etc.), and develop skills for translating results from raw numbers to meaningful analysis. Students further skills in research design and participate in interviewing, observation, and ethnographnic data collection techniques. Prerequisites: HCS200 Human Communication Theory with a C or better and junior status.

HCS365 Language and Meaning (3 crs.)

Philosophical examination of relationship between thoughts, words, and actions. Theories of symbolic interaction, social constructionism, and semiotics are the basis for course. Exploration given to application of theory to contexts as diverse as specific social movements, health care, public discourse, diversity, conflicts, debates, political campaigns, and family dynamics. Prerequisites: HCS200 Human Communication Theory with a C or better.

HCS370 Rhetorical Criticism (3 crs.)

Emphasizes the process of critical analysis. Students use methodologies of analysis, advanced in recent years, as the analytical tools for examining rhetorical artifacts, construct interesting research questions, and employ the methodologies of analysis to answer those questions. Prerequisites: ENG101 College Writing and HCS200 Introduction to Human Communication Theory with a C or better, and junior status.

HCS385 Resolving Conflict through Communication (3 crs.)

Skill-building course focusing on communication skills which assist in the settlement of disputes. Students use communication techniques such as listening, interviewing, responding, and persuading and apply them to conflict situations. These skills are applied to non-adversarial methods of conflict resolution such as interest-based negotiation and third-party mediation.

HCS390 Internship I (3 crs.)

Offers a planned program of full or part-time work in a field related to human communication which supplements classroom learning. Placement must be approved by the student's academic advisor. Approval of the department chair and the college dean is required. Prerequisites: 2.5 QPA in major, 2.25 overall, and junior status.

HCS391 Internship II (3 crs.)

Offers a planned program of full or part-time work in a field related to human communication which supplements classroom learning. Placement must be approved by the student's academic advisor. Approval of the department chair and the college dean is required. Prerequisites: 3.25 QPA in major, 3.0 overall, and senior status.

HCS392 Internship III (3 crs.)

Offers a planned program of full or part-time work in a field related to human communication which supplements classroom learning. Placement must be approved by the student's academic advisor. Approval of the department chair and the college dean is required. Prerequisites: 3.5 QPA in major, 3.25 overall, and senior status.

HCS393 Selected Topics in Speech (3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interests not covered by the regular courses. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

HCS400 Senior Seminar (3 crs.)

Required capstone course for all HCS majors that emphasizes a summative experience in the advanced studies of selected areas of the field of human communication. Students expected to produce, from their own scholarly investigation, results that are potentially presentable at professional conferences and in scholarly publications. Prerequisites: HSC360 Research Methods in Communication with a C or better, senior status, and approval of the instructor.

HCS410 Feminist Perspectives on Communication Theory and Research Methods (3 crs.)

Critical examination of traditional theories of human communication and research methods in terms of their invalid claims to universalism and their value implications which have perpetuated a world view that is masculine biased. Students develop an understanding of the interaction process, in different communication contexts, as well as the role of the researcher in assessing communicative encounters. Students deconstruct traditional perspectives on basis of the insights gained through diverse feminist perspectives and discover alternative approaches to communication studies.

Information Systems Studies (ISS)

ISS515 Information Systems Project Management (3 crs.)

Introduces the student to the principles and practices necessary to be an effective information systems team member or project manager. Covers project scope, time, costs, quality, and human resource management techniques as applied to the kinds of project management problems and issues unique to the IS environment. The student will obtain hands-on experience using MS Project as well as other types of project management software. Specific course emphasis will focus on the techniques of project management, leadership, teamwork, and project risk management. Case work will be a major part of this course.

ISS520 Programs, Data, and File Structures (3 crs.)

Advanced programming, data organization, and accessing design techniques.

ISS530 Modeling and Decision Systems (3 crs.)

Explores a wide range of analytical techniques that may be employed in business decision-making processes. Topical coverage includes simulation, project management, financial analysis, optimization, break-even analysis, and inventory management. While the theoretical foundations of these concepts are addressed, emphasis is on applications and solution techniques relevant to practical business situations. Utilization of current computer technology is an integral part of the course.

ISS540 Data Communications, Networks, and Distributed Data Processing (3 crs.)

Covers communications environments, communication system components, networks and control, common carrier services, design of communications networks, network management and distributed environment, local area data networks, future networks.

ISS550 Database Design (3 crs.)

The data environment, basic technical concepts and system resources for data, database concepts, use and management of databases.

ISS560 Introduction to E-Business (3 crs.)

Covers the Internet and electronic commerce concepts related business operations and management, technology utilization, and industry-specific applications. It is intended to introduce students to the current business, management, technology, and legal issues in e-business. Topics span a wide range and include web strategies, e-marketing, e-human resources, e-finances, B-to-B systems, e-legal issues, website design, technology needs, and database-driven web sites.

ISS570 Information Analysis (3 crs.)

Designed to provide student with the necessary skills to accomplish the systems analysis and logical design of information systems. It will include the role of a modern systems analyst as a problem solver in the business organization. Course will progress through the system development life cycle (SDLC) and include project planning, project management, and feasibility assessment. Different methodologies, models, tools and techniques used to analyze and design and build systems will be introduced.

ISS580 Web Programming (3 crs.)

Includes, but not limited to, the following topics: introduction to the Internet and the World Wide Web, programming, using Microsoft Express and Visual InterDev, JavaScript programming, Dynamic HTML programming, ActiveX controls, electronic commerce and security, web servers, active server pages, CGI and PERL, and XML. A major portion of this course will be to build a website based upon an e-commerce business.

ISS590 Information Systems Development I (3 crs.)

First in a two semester sequence where students apply the knowledge they have gained in MSIS program. While studying various software development paradigms, the students practice those techniques by performing requirements analysis and design of a state-of-the-art information systems project to solve a given business problem. This course stresses team management, project planning, and risk assessment in addition to technical skills.

ISS600 Information Systems Development II (3 crs.)

Second in a two semester sequence where students apply the knowledge they have gained in MSIS program. The projects started in ISS 590 are implemented and tested. Technical knowledge and experience with configuration management tools, inspection and testing strategies is paired with project management and risk analysis techniques.

Interdisciplinary Arts (IAP)

IAP111 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Arts (3 crs.)

Introduces the variety of the creative and performing arts—theater, music, painting, sculpture, dance, photography, literature, and film —and demonstrates the ways in which these arts can influence and enhance one another. Through class discussion, guest lectures by arts faculty, and attendance at campus arts events, students learn how to better appreciate and respond to the different artistic media by exploring the ways in which a creation in one art form can inspire re-creation in another. Course satisfies a Category B General Education: Humanities requirement and is a introductory course for the Interdisciplinary Arts major.

IAP449 Interdisciplinary Arts Senior Thesis (3 crs.)

Capstone course required for IA majors in the first semester of their senior year. Working collaboratively under the guidance of the course instructor, students conduct individual research projects resulting in either a substantive work of creative writing or a documented thesis paper with an interdisciplinary approach to the arts. Prerequisite: IAP111.

IAP451 Interdisciplinary Arts Showcase (3 crs.)

Provides IA majors with opportunity to design, prepare, and present a public exhibition of their work in the form of an illustrated lecture, a performance piece, a multimedia presentation, a dramatic reading, or a work of film, video, or computer animation. Prerequisites: IAP111 and IAP449.

IAP452 Interdisciplinary Arts Internship (3 crs.)

Offers IA majors the opportunity for full- or part-time work in an arts-related profession. All work programs must be reviewed and given prior approval by the program director and the dean, and supervised by a Shippensburg University faculty member. Prerequisites: IAP111 and IAP449.

International Studies (INT)

INT200 Introduction to International Studies (3 crs.)

Introductory course for International Studies Minor and Area Studies Certificates. Uses an interdisciplinary approach to assist in understanding other cultures, countries, and world regions, and the global forces that link them together. Facilitates recognition of potential tensions in cross-cultural encounters, international relations and globalization.

INT300 International Studies Seminar (3 crs.)

Capstone course for the International Studies Minor. Uses an interdisciplinary approach to investigate a region of the world or global topic. Involves seminar discussions of readings, speakers, and audiovisual media, and a research project related to the course topic. Prerequisites: INT 200 or permission of instructor.

INT390 International Studies Internship (3-6 crs.)

Opportunity to apply knowledge of international studies to practical applications at an internship site. Prerequisites: INT200 and 6 additional credits of International Studies courses.

Management (MGT)

MGT305 Organizational Behavior (3 crs.)

Emphasizes contributions of many disciplines to management practices considering the interrelationship among individual, group, and organization with an international focus added. Examines analytical and behavioral skills necessary to enhance managerial potential and facilitate individual contributions to organizational effectiveness. Applies concepts of learning, motivation, intra- and inter-group behavior, leadership, decision making, power, conflict, and politics to an understanding of teamwork and the issues of quality within and among organizations. Prerequisites: Junior standing or departmental permission.

MGT337 Issues in Entrepreneurship (3 crs.)

Covers a series of applied topics in a very hands-on method. Concepts, theories, and business practices from a variety of disciplines covered from an entrepreneurial prospective. This perspective used to drive students to a more thorough understanding of the necessities of an entrepreneur or manager-entrepreneur. Consists of a series of discipline modules considered the tools of the entrepreneur.

MGT340 Human Resource Management (3 crs.)

Investigates the role of organization as it pertains to the attraction, selection and retention of human resources. Human resource strategies, methods, techniques, and procedures are examined with emphasis on job analysis, human resource planning and forecasting, recruitment, selection, training and development, compensation, and benefits. Impact of state and federal legislation on human resource techniques discussed. Prerequisite: MGT305 or departmental permission.

MGT342 Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining (3 crs.)

Introduction to employee-management organizational relations in the private and public sectors in both union and non-union settings. Topics such as negotiation, administration and content of labor agreements, dispute resolution, and organizational relations abroad may be included. Prerequisite: Upper division status or departmental permission. Students cannot receive credit for both MGT342 and PLS381.

MGT346 Human Resource Management Law (3 crs.)

Investigates in-depth federal and state legislative, judicial, and administrative regulation of the employer/employee relationship in the private sector. Presents overview of labor law. Topical coverage may include equal employment opportunity, affirmative action, wage-hour law, employee pension and benefits, workers' compensation, unemployment compensation, privacy, occupational health and safety, and legal basis for collective bargaining. Prerequisite: BSL261 or departmental permission.

MGT348 Compensation Administration (3 crs.)

Emphasizes an in-depth analysis of the equity issues as they relate to human resource compensation and organizational effectiveness. Topical coverage includes internal equity, external equity, individual equity, legal framework, and cost. Prerequisite: MGT340 or departmental permission.

MGT349 International Human Resource Management (3 crs.)

Examines major social, legal, political, and economic forces impacting the international human resource administration. Emphasis placed on the response of the international human resource specialist to these forces. Discussion, cases, and outside readings among the course materials used. Prerequisites: Junior status and MGT340 or departmental permission.

MGT361 Employment Interviewing (1 cr.)

Explores the various types of interviews utilized in the selection and management of human resources. Students will have the opportunity of conducting each of the different interviews discussed. Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission.

MGT368 Senior Seminar I (3 crs.)

MGT369 Senior Seminar II (3 crs.)

MGT370 International Business (3 crs.)

Overview of the issues facing managers of import-export firms, trading companies, international service companies, and multinational corporations. Topics include international trade, exchange rates, government relations, international organization, economic integration, and the impact of culture on the various functions of management. Prerequisite: Junior standing or department permission.

MGT380,381 Global Business Exploration Program I and II (1-3 crs.)

Improves working in teams skills, while simultaneously improving the content knowledge of international issues. Makes students aware of the parochialism and ethnocentrism in management in a non-U.S. setting and decreases the U.S. centric view of international management. GBEP researches outstanding learning opportunities, assists students with study abroad challenges and increases the learning experience through a collaborative student-led team project management.

MGT394 Leadership (3 crs.)

Designed to: provide a theoretical and conceptual understanding of leadership; develop a knowledge framework of leadership that will contribute to development as a management professional; and develop the skills and practical guidelines necessary to be an effective leader. Prerequisite: MGT 305.

MGT431 Change Management (3 crs.)

Examines new business attitude and its effect on organizational performance. Topics will include the intrapreneurial mind, business planning within organizations, managerial versus intrapreneurial decision making, corporate versus intrapreneurial culture, climate for intrapreneurship, intrapreneurial leadership qualities, establishing intrapreneurship in organizations, dealing with organizational change and development, evaluating organizational opportunities, establishing a long-term perspective to business evaluation, acquiring corporate resources and backing, and gaining corporate support for new business ideas. Prerequisites: ACC 201, FIN 311, and MGT 305.

MGT432 Entrepreneurship (3 crs.)

Focuses on the concepts, skills, and know-how, information, attitudes and alternatives relevant for start-up and early-stage entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial managers. A difficult and complex course with two fundamental objectives: To teach the use of entrepreneurial perspective in order to make better decisions and increase the odds of success; and teach effective entrepreneurial and general management practice from the perspectives of the founder and the vital stakeholders who can make a substantial difference in the ultimate success or failure of the entrepreneurial process. Central focus is the critical role of opportunity creation and recognition, as the principal success factor in new enterprise formation and building. Especially relevant for aspiring entrepreneurs bent on launching and growing a business. Prerequisites: MGT 337 and MGT 433.

MGT433 Small Business Management (3 crs.)

Studies the concerns and trends unique to small businesses. Emphasis on the profitable operation of an ongoing small business. Designed for students who are primarily interested in owning and managing the small business enterprise. Case analysis and analysis of actual small business operations will be used. Consideration will be given regarding how to market and produce new and existing products and how to determine pricing and demand elasticities. Basic objective to enhance the students' probability of successfully running and growing a small business by mixing a variety of instructional exercises including the textbook, Internet exercises, a simulation, and a promotional newsletter or brochure. Prerequisites: ACC201, FIN311, MGT305, MKT305.

MGT447 Business and Society (3 crs.)

Examines role of business in a social system including interrelationships with government, the community, employees, and other major publics. A major focus is social responsibility of business. Consideration given to such areas as international business, business ethics, pollution, and impact of governmental regulations. Prerequisite: Senior status or departmental permission.

MGT470 International Management (3 crs.)

Study of the unique problems associated with the management of firms operating in an international environment. Focus on the strategic and comparative issues. Prerequisite: MGT370 or departmental permission.

MGT490 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

MGT497 Strategic Management (3 crs.)

Examines strategic decision making under conditions of dynamic uncertainty, with focus on integrating the domains of the various majors in the college to facilitate understanding of each employee's and each discipline's role in the total organization. Importance of achieving a fit between the internal and external environment for organizational survival and success is a central issue. Consideration given to influence of social, demographic, technological, political/legal, economic, and global environments, as well as industry environment of competitors, buyers, suppliers, and substitutes. Course is cross-functional capstone course for all business majors. All students expected to participate in designated AACSB International student learning outcome assessments. Prerequisites: MKT305, FIN311, SCM330, MGT305, Senior standing.

 

Management Information Systems

ISM142 Business Computer Systems (3 crs.)

Examines role of information systems within the functional areas of an organization. Characteristics of the different types of business information systems, such as transaction processing, management reporting, division support, etc., will be discussed. Software exposure will include selected features of the Windows operating system and selected applications software packages.

ISM240 Introduction to Programming Concepts (3 crs.)

Introduces the process of application programming through exploration of programming syntax, object creation, and logic structures. Characteristics of object vs. non-object orientation also discussed. Additional topics include arrays, file processing, data base interfacing, graphics, object linking and embedding, dynamic link libraries, screen design, and front-end application development through languages such as Visual Basic. Prerequisite: MIS142 or equivalent.

ISM242 Design and Development of User Information Systems (3 crs.)

Emphasizes the theory and concepts of end-user computing. Topics include study of formal and informal information systems; evolution of end-user computer systems; role and impact of end-user computing on Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software. Concepts and techniques of modeling and decision support systems will be incorporated in development and implementation of end-user applications using Internet development tools. Prerequisite: MIS142 or permission of department chair.

ISM300 Information Technology and Business Operations (3 crs.)

Designed to address the challenging role of information technology and management information systems in today's global business organizations. Deals with different types of information systems, planning and developing databases, and other organizational issues dealing with information technology.

ISM340 Business Programming (3 CRS.)

Introduces the fundamental principles of structured computer programming techniques using the C++ programming language. Topics include basic C++ syntax, conditional statements, loops, arrays, functions, and file I/O. Students create programs for a wide range of business scenarios, debug the programs, and test the results for correctness. Prerequisite: MIS142 or equivalent or permission of department chair.

ISM344 Business Systems Analysis and Design (3 crs.)

Provides an in-depth study of the tools and techniques of systems analysis, including feasibility, preliminary and detail systems investigations. Provides the framework necessary for design, development, and implementation of a business information system. Prerequisites: Upper division status.

ISM355 Database Applications (3 crs.)

Designed to provide the fundamentals of a database environment and addresses data and information management issues. Students develop understanding of the various roles within the data administration function of an organization. Covers the fundamental design of relational database management systems and applications. Prerequisite: ISM240 or equivalent.

ISM393 Selected Topics in Business Information Systems (3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

ISM420 Telecommunications and Distributed Processing (3 crs.)

Examines technology, organization, and operations of telecommunications and distributed data processing systems. Topics discussed include hardware/software facilities, transmission systems, system design considerations, and network configurations. Hands-on exercises and case studies used to illustrate the application of telecommunication and distributed processing technology. Prerequisite: MIS344 or permission of instructor.

ISM442 Electronic Commerce and Technology Integration (3 crs.)

Covers the Internet and electronic commerce concepts related to three specific areas: business operations and management, technology utilization, and industry-specific applications such as finance and marketing. Class lectures and hands-on application development applied to the examination of business and technical issues involved in designing, implementing, and managing business operations and commerce via electronic means, including the Internet. Prerequisite: MIS355 and upper division status.

ISM446 Information Systems Project Development (3 crs.)

This senior capstone course provides an in-depth coverage of the analysis, design, and development of projects within the various environments including business. Cooperative project teams will propose, design and build solutions for selected academic or business applications. Coverage includes: analysis of current project requirements, management of project activities; design of proposed solution; activity scheduling; establishment of practical quality controls; publication of project documentation; project delivery and closure. Project management concepts, earned value management, and brainstorming techniques will be covered with related software introduced. Prerequisite: Senior status.

ISM490 Selected Topics in Business Information Systems (3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

 

Marketing (MKT)

MKT305 Principles of Marketing (3 crs.)

Introduction to language and issues of marketing with emphasis on learning to develop responsive marketing strategies to meet consumer needs. Topics include market segmentation, product development, promotion, distribution, and pricing. Introduction to such topics as the external environment, marketing research, international marketing, ethics, and careers in marketing may be included. Prerequisites: Business majors, upper division status; non-business majors, ECO102 or ECO113 and junior standing.

MKT306 Buyer Behavior (3 crs.)

Presents comprehensive, systematic and conceptual framework for understanding buyer behavior. Models from behavior sciences are studied. Topics such as demographics, lifestyle, information processing, and individual and group decision-making are also studied. Prerequisite: MKT305 or departmental permission.

MKT315 Sales Management (3 crs.)

Emphasis on all aspects of managing a sales force. Topical coverage includes the sales process, recruiting, selection, compensation, training, and evaluation of salespeople. Other topics may include sales forecasting, sales quotes, number of sales territories needed, routing, and analysis of sales volume. Students exposed to sales careers they can pursue. Prerequisite: MKT305 or departmental permission.

MKT325 Advertising and Promotional Strategy (3 crs.)

Studies the increasing importance of this marketing communication activity in contemporary society. Students consider persuasive communications efforts beyond advertising and become involved in real-life projects to experience and understand the relationship between theory and practice. Prerequisite: MKT305 or departmental permission.

MKT335 E-Marketing (3 crs.)

Examines use of electronic data and applications for planning and executing the conception, distribution, promotion and pricing of ideas, goods, and services to create exchanges that satisfy individual and organizational objectives. Covered are e-business models, e-commerce, business intelligence, customer relationship management, supply chain management, enterprise resource planning, on-line issues, and Internet marketing strategies. Prerequisite: MKT305 or departmental permission.

MKT342 Business-to-Business Marketing and Analysis (3 crs.)

Focuses on marketing products and services to other businesses. Examines organizational buying, market planning and analysis, and business marketing mix/strategy development. Emphasizes differences between consumer and business marketing management. Role of salespersons as consultants to business customers such as manufacturing firms, transportation companies, banks, retailers, and management advisory service firms is covered. Explores electronic business applications in customer relationship management. Prerequisite: MKT305 or departmental permission.

MKT349 Logistics Management (3 crs.)

Examines management aspects of moving and storing raw materials, semi-finished and finished goods throughout the supply chain. Topics include transportation, inventory control, warehousing, materials management, packaging, customer service, international logistics, and site location. Relationships among these elements are stressed. Prerequisites: MAT181 and junior standing or departmental permission.

MKT350 Transportation Industry Theory and Practice (3 crs.)

Study of the transportation industry, concentrating on mode description, history, costs, rates, services, and government regulation. Exposes student to market-rate considerations, carrier finances, operational factors, and current issues. Passenger, urban and international transportation also considered. Prerequisite: ECO102 or ECO113 or departmental permission.

MKT352 Principles of Retailing (3 crs.)

In-depth analysis of store operation and management, merchandising techniques, methods for promotion, advertising and selling, pricing methods, and ways of controlling inventories. Examines current trends in retailing. Prerequisite: MKT305 or departmental permission.

MKT360 International Marketing (3 crs.)

The socio-political-legal-economic environment of international marketing operations, which may include cross-cultural consumer behavior, international marketing research, forms of regional market agreements, international product, pricing, distribution and promotion policies, multinational corporations, and world trade patterns. Prerequisite: MKT305 or departmental permission.

MKT365 Relationship Marketing (3 crs.)

An introduction to the theoretical and applied perspectives of relationship marketing. Focuses on the driving forces that cultivate relationships between customer and company. Relationship marketing topics include (but are not limited to) brand and supplier loyalty/commitment, relationship-based buying, psychological relationship theory (with emphasis on applying such theory to marketing practices), and applications of customer relationship management (CRM). Prerequisite: MKT305 or departmental permission.

MKT370 Services Marketing (3 crs.)

Examines marketing theory and methods applied to profit and nonprofit service industries such as health care, finance, transportation, retailing, tourism, sports, arts and consulting. Conceptual understanding of services and the analytical tools used in solving services marketing problems are discussed. Prerequisite: MKT305 or departmental permission.

MKT380 Sports Marketing (3 crs.)

Analysis of sports, especially as marketing tools affect the performance, participants, spectators and society in general. Internal and external factors analyzed as they affect marketing and management actions. Prerequisite: MKT305 or departmental permission.

MKT390 Selected Topics in Marketing (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

MKT430 Marketing Research (3 crs.)

In-depth study of the tools of marketing research, including methodology and techniques used in measuring characteristics of markets for products and services. Topics include the research process, data collection, sampling, data analysis, and presentation of results. Contains hands-on development of capabilities to study characteristics of the marketplace. Prerequisite: MKT305, MKT306, SCM200, or departmental permission.

MKT490 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

MKT495 Marketing Analysis and Strategy Development (3 crs.)

Capstone synthesis course for marketing majors. Requires students to apply information and skills learned in business core and marketing courses to case situations and research projects. Critical thinking, use of marketing research, and strategic decision making are stressed. Emphasizes the use of written and oral communication skills as part of the marketing core requirements. Prerequisites: MKT305, MKT306, MKT430, or departmental permission.

Mathematics (MAT)

MAT050/051/052/053 Developmental Mathematics (1-3 crs.)

Studies real operations, factoring, rational expressions, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, simultaneous equations, word problems, formula manipulations. Emphasis on drill in computational algebra. Students exempted from, or placed in, this on the basis of an examination. Prerequisite: Open only to students who, through testing, show a deficiency in mathematical competency.  MAT 050 is 3 credits, MAT 051/052 are 1 credit, and MAT053 is 2 credits.

MAT105 Mathematics for Liberal Studies (3 crs.)

Examines mathematical structures and applications in a way designed to emphasize the creative and cultural aspects of mathematics. Topics may include voting systems, fair division problems, game theory, coding, networks, critical paths, linear programming, symmetry and patterns. Not open to math majors.

MAT110 Fundamentals of Mathematics I (3 crs.)

Designed to satisfy the mathematical needs of students in elementary education and related curricula. Topics covered include a study of problem solving strategies, mathematical reasoning, elementary set theory, number systems other than base 10, elementary number theory, and an axiomatic development of the real number system. Students solve mathematical problems using hands-on materials and electronic technologies. Emphasizes goals and procedures addressed in current state and national standards for school mathematics.

MAT111 Fundamentals of Mathematics II (3 crs.)

Designed to strengthen mathematical content knowledge of students majoring in elementary education. Focus on topics such as proportional reasoning, data analysis and probability, geometry, measurement, and algebraic reasoning. Students solve mathematical problems using hands-on materials and electronic technologies. Emphasizes goals and procedures addressed in current state and national standards for school mathematics. Prerequisite: MAT 110 or permission of the department chair.

MAT117 Applied Statistics (4 cr.)

A first course in the concepts and methods of statistics with illustrations from across the humanities and the social, behavioral, and biological sciences. Emphasis on inferential methods and interpretation of statistical results provided. Specific topics include numerical and graphical descriptions of data, random sampling methods, probability and sampling distributions, correlation and linear regression, and inference methods such as confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for means and proportions (one and two sample), chi-squared test, ANOVA, and common non-parametric techniques. A graphing calculator with statistical capabilities (such as TI-83+) is required. Recommended as general education statistics course for students majoring in social and life sciences, but not limited to students in those majors. Not open to students who have passed SCM 200, MAT 165, or MAT 313; or math majors.

MAT120 Basic Mathematical Models (3 crs.)

Mathematical models, used in almost every field of study, help us understand complex situations by representing data in various ways. This course teaches how to collect data and represent it graphically, numerically, and algebraically. It also teaches how to convert between these representations and choose the most appropriate representation. Topics include construction and manipulation of linear, polynomial, and exponential functions. Not open to students who have passed MAT140, MAT175, MAT181 or MAT courses above the 100 level.

MAT140 Finite Mathematics (3 crs.)

Provides background necessary for Applied Calculus (MAT181). Studies functions and graphs; polynomial functions; rational functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of equations and inequalities (including matrix notation) and a brief introduction to probability. Prerequisites: MAT120 or college level high placement. Not open to math majors.

MAT165 Probability with Statistical Reasoning (3 crs.)

Introduction to probability, with applications to statistics. Topics include counting methods, elementary probability, discrete continuous probability distributions (binomial, normal, Poisson, hypergeometric), and sampling distributions. Includes a discussion of describing data sets numerically and graphically, along with a limited introduction to the use of probability in inferential statistics (one-sample hypothesis tests and confidence intervals for a mean). A TI83/84 graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: college level high placement or MAT 120. Not open to students who have passed SCM200, MAT117 or MAT 313; or math majors.

MAT175 Precalculus (4 crs.)

Designed to prepare students for MAT211. Provides intense study of the topics which are fundamental to the study of calculus. Emphasis placed on functions and their graphs with special attention to polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions, and analytic trigonometry. Upon completion, students should be able to solve practical problems and use appropriate models for analysis and prediction. Prerequisite: MAT120 or college level high placement. Not open to students who have successfully passed MAT211.

MAT181 Applied Calculus (3 crs.)

Designed for students in the College of Business. Topics include differentiation and integration of functions of a single variable with applications including graphing and simple optimization. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT140 or advanced level placement. Course not open to students who have successfully (C or better) completed MAT211.

MAT211 Calculus I (4 crs.)

Introduction to study of differential and integral calculus from algebraic, numerical, and graphical points of view. Concept of limit and applications of derivatives will be covered. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT175 or advanced level placement.

MAT212 Calculus II (4 crs.)

Continuation of Calculus I. Will include methods of integration, applications and infinite series. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT211.

MAT213 Calculus III (4 crs.)

Generalization of single-variable calculus to higher dimensions. Parametric curves and applications covered. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MAT212.

MAT225 Discrete Mathematics (4 crs.)

Study of topics usually associated with analysis of discrete and/or finite mathematical models. Topics from logic, set theory, Boolean algebra, mathematical proof, recursion, induction, combinatorics, discrete probability, matrices and graph theory covered. Prerequisite: MAT120 or college level high placement.

MAT313 Statistics I (4 crs.)

Topics include exploratory data analysis, basic probability, the Central Limit Theorem, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, linear regression, experimental design, analysis of variance and goodness of fit tests. A statistical software package will be utilized throughout course. Prerequisite: MAT211.

MAT318 Elementary Linear Algebra (3 crs.)

Introduction to the study of matrices, linear systems, determinants, eigenvalues, and the geometry of linear operators. Topics from Euclidean n-space include linear transformations, linear independence, span, bases, inner product, and vector spaces. An introduction to structural proof techniques will be a part of the key concepts for the course. Prerequisite: C or better in MAT 212 or MAT 225.

MAT320 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (3 crs.)

Introduction to abstract algebraic structures and formal mathematical proof. Structures may include groups, rings, or fields. Prerequisite: C or better in MAT225 and MAT318.

MAT322 Differential Equations (3 crs.)

Study of first order differential equations. Topics include modeling with differential equations, initial value problems, first and second order linear differential equations, systems of linear differential equations and numerical methods, as well as material chosen from the following topics: Laplace transforms, advanced numerical methods, and partial differential equations. Prerequisite: MAT212.

MAT326 Mathematical Modeling (3 crs.)

Study of construction of mathematical models to solve real world problems. Entire modeling process from construction of the model, fitting data to the model, analysis, and verification of the model covered. Both continuous and discrete models examined. Examples taken from a variety of disciplines. Prerequisites: Either CSC180 or CSC110 and either MAT213 or MAT318 or by permission of the instructor.

MAT333 Geometry (3 crs.)

Rigorous treatment of foundations of Euclidean geometry and an introduction to spherical and hyperbolic geometries. Topics may include transformational geometry, coordinate geometry, congruence, similarity and constructions. Also provides an historical development of attempts made through the centuries to clarify and expand upon the geometric axioms. Prerequisite: MAT225.

MAT393 Selected Topics in Mathematics (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

MAT395,396 Mathematics Internship (3 crs. each)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

MAT400 History of Mathematics (3 crs.)

Focuses on the development of mathematical ideas relevant to K-12 mathematics. Some examples include episodes in the development of number systems, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, number theory, and analytic geometry. Some time spent on multicultural issues, sometimes referred to as "ethnomathematics." Prerequisite: MAT320 or at least junior standing.

MAT410 Numerical Analysis (3 crs.)

Primarily methods of numerical approximation to the value of functions, polynomials, and systems of equations. Topics include accuracy of approximate calculations, interpolation and interpolating polynomials, solution of algebraic and transcendental equations. Numerical solution of simultaneous linear and nonlinear equations, principle of least squares, difference equations, and quadrature formulas are studied. Prerequisite: MAT212 and either CSC180 or CSC110.

MAT413 Statistics II (3 crs.)

Study of statistical methods and their application to various data sets. The entire statistical process of data collection, fitting data to a model, analysis of the model, verification of the model, and inference will be covered. Topics include hypothesis testing, two-population means, bivariate relationships, regression, ANOVA, experimental designs, two-way tables, time series, survival analysis and multivariate analysis. Examples taken from a variety of disciplines. Concepts reinforced through class projects. Prerequisite: MAT 313.

MAT421 Number Theory and Cryptography (3 crs.)

Introduction to a selection of topics from the related fields of Number Theory and Cryptography. Topics may include congruence arithmetic, primitive roots, quadratic residues, perfect numbers, Pythagorean triples, sums of squares, Fermat's Last Theorem, and primality testing, various substitution ciphers including affine, Vigenere, and Hill ciphers and the RSA public key encryption system with several variations. Algorithms for each encryption scheme discussed will be introduced and implemented. Prerequisite: MAT 320.

MAT422 Partial Differential Equations (3 crs.)

Introduction to Partial Differential Equations, a fundamental branch of applied mathematics. Three classical equations from mathematical physics are discussed: the wave equation, the heat equation and Laplace's equation. Techniques which include separation of variables, Fourier series and fundamental solutions are introduced to address these equations. A introduction to numerical methods is also included. Prerequisites: MAT213 and MAT322.

MAT425 Advanced Algebraic Structures (3 crs.)

Detailed study of one or more of the higher level algebraic structures such as groups, rings, fields, or abstract vector spaces. Emphasis on structure theorems such as the fundamental theorem of group homomorphisms and uses the sophistication developed in MAT 320. Prerequisite: MAT 318 and MAT 320.

MAT430 Complex Analysis (3 crs.)

Introductory course in the theory of functions of a complex variable. Topics include complex numbers, analytic functions, contour integration, Cauchy's Theorem, and infinite series. Methods of a logical proof are developed and used throughout. Prerequisite: MAT212 and MAT320.

MAT441 Real Analysis I (3 crs.)

Designed to give a fundamental understanding of the concepts used in elementary calculus. Methods of a logical proof are developed and used throughout. Topics include real numbers, sequences, limits, continuity, derivatives and the Riemann integral. Prerequisites: MAT213, and MAT320.

MAT450 Combinatorics (3 crs.)

Concerned with computing within discrete mathematical structures and combinatorial problem solving. Topics include sets and graphs; counting and enumeration techniques including recurrence relations and generating functions; and graph theory algorithms. Prerequisite: MAT320.

MAT456 Deterministic Methods of Operations Research (3 crs.)

After a brief historical introduction, presents a detailed study of mathematics related to linear programming. The theory includes the simplex method, duality theory, sensitivity analysis, and matrix games. Some applications will be given. Prerequisites: MAT212 and MAT318.

MAT476 Probability (3 crs.)

In-depth development of probability and distribution theory. Topics include counting techniques, Bayes' Theorem, random variables, moment-generating functions, univariate and multivariate probability distributions, and the Central Limit Theorem. Prerequisites: MAT213, and MAT318.

MAT486 Mathematical Statistics (3 crs.)

Continuation of MAT476. Topics include transformations of random variables, order statistics, convergence in distribution, point and interval estimation, likelihood ratio tests, hypothesis testing, linear models, analysis of enumerative data, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: MAT476.

MAT490 Selected Topics in Mathematics (3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer experimental courses at the senior level in areas of mathematics not covered by regular courses. Topics such as foundations of mathematics, number theory, graph theory, cryptography, and advanced applications of mathematics are appropriate at this level.

MAT516 Mathematical Modeling (3 crs.)

Involves the process of developing mathematical models as a means for solving real problems. Course will encompass several different modeling situations that use a variety of mathematical topics. The mathematical fundamentals of these topics will be discussed, but with continued reference to their use in finding the solutions to problems. Connections to NCTM Standards, current curriculum projects and the use of various technologies will be made throughout the course.

MAT527 Number Theory Discovery (3 crs.)

Number theory, one of the oldest branches of mathematics, is very much an alive subject, with discoveries made every day. Course is intended to focus on topics that relate specifically to the natural numbers. These will be treated as motivational problems to be used in an activity-oriented approach to teaching mathematics at the middle and high school levels. Pace will be non-frantic and designed to promote understanding of the topics covered. Topics include prime number facts and conjectures, divisibility theory for integers, magic squares, Pascal's triangle, Fibonacci numbers, modular arithmetic, and mathematical art.

MAT528 Algebra for Teachers of Mathematics (3 crs.)

Classically algebra has its origins in the solution of equations. The term algebra comes from the Arabic word meaning reductions or restoration and had to do with the idea that in equations whatever was done to one side had to likewise be done to the other in order to maintain or restore equivalence. Modern algebra developed from several classical problems such as: efforts to systematically understand the solutions of polynomials of higher degree; problems of geometry such as construction of regular polygons, trisection of angles, etc., and problems in number theory, e.g. Fermat's Last Theorem. In this sense, algebra is applied mathematics. Thus the abstraction of algebra is not for its own sake but because it results in insight and mathematical power. We will study the integers, rationals, reals, polynomials and complex numbers from the point of view of being examples of some of the fundamental objects of algebra — rings and fields.

MAT534 Geometrical Concepts (3 crs.)

Focuses primarily on the foundations and applications of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. Incorporates collaborative learning and the investigation of ideas through group projects and the use of technology. Topics include finite geometries, geometric transformations, triangle and circle properties not previously encountered, and spherical geometry. Course will provide deeper understanding of geometry that is needed to teach geometry and to illustrate connections between it and other branches of mathematics.

MAT538 Topics in Discrete Mathematics (3 crs.)

Discrete mathematics is the primary source of examples for the Problem Solving and Reasoning and Proof Standards in the 2000 NCTM Principles and Standards for School Mathematics. Provides an in-depth look at one or more of the many branches of discrete mathematics, with particular emphasis on Problem Solving and Reasoning and Proof in the Secondary Math Curriculum. Specific topics will be taken from the fields of graph theory, recurrence relations, generating functions, game theory, design theory, coding theory, combinatorics or cryptography. Prerequisite: MAT320 or familiarity with mathematical proof.

MAT543 Concepts of Calculus (3 crs.)

Many schools teach some form of calculus for 11th or 12th grade students. Current reform efforts in calculus have shifted the emphasis toward conceptual understanding of key ideas. Conceptual questions take many forms, including interpreting graphical data, using numerical estimation, proving properties of functions and operations, and understanding the foundations of the basic calculus tools. Course will follow a standard textbook for single variable calculus along with material correlated with the AP Calculus exam, and will emphasize the theory behind the main ideas to prepare teachers for creation, discussion, and assessment of conceptual calculus problems.

MAT551 Technology in the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics (3 crs.)

Provides opportunities to explore the utilization of desktop and handheld technologies, which enhance the teaching and learning of mathematics. Applications of calculators to the school curriculum to be explored include the use of graphing, symbolic, and scientific calculators as well as peripherals such as CBLs and CBRs. Opportunities to investigate computer supported symbolic manipulation systems, geometry programs, spreadsheet applications, and Internet resources. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor.

MAT552 Mathematical Discovery (3 crs.)

Treats problems from many areas of mathematics with emphasis on understanding, learning, and teaching problem solving. The history of problem solving in general and its application to particular problems is investigated.

MAT572 Probability for Middle and High School Teachers (3 crs.)

Explores introductory topics such as computing probabilities for simple, compound events, mutually exclusive and conditional events. Further topics include the study of random variables, expected value, discrete distributions including binomial and Poisson, continuous distributions including normal, uniform, and exponential, simulations, and sampling distributions of sample statistics. TI-83 graphing calculators and the statistical package Fathom will be used throughout the course.

MAT573 Statistics for Middle and High School Teachers (3 crs.)

Involves the study of statistical methods. Both graphical and numerical representations of data, including histograms, box plots, scatterplots, and measures of center and spread will be introduced. Process of data collection and experimental design will be explored. Course will conclude with topics involving inference, including confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for means and proportions. Real data sets from a variety of disciplines will be utilized. The TI-83 graphing calculator and the statistical package Fathom will be used throughout the course. Prerequisite: MAT 572.

MAT600 Elements of Research (3 crs.)

Devoted to research techniques and procedures in mathematics and/or mathematics education. Instructor discusses research methods and each student selects a topic on which to do a research study. This study is presented to the class in oral and written form.

Military Science (MIL)

MIL131,132 Military Science I (2 crs.)

Introduces fundamentals of the U.S. Army through individual skills training and group exercises. Meets two hours per week each semester. Offers opportunity to participate in several different types of adventure training, on and off campus.

MIL231,232 Military Science II (2 crs.)

Provides instruction in basic tactics and military skills and the opportunity to participate in field training exercises. Highlights various leadership skills necessary to overcome management problems. Meets two hours per week each semester. Includes numerous voluntary sessions of adventure training, on and off campus.

MIL240 Leader's Training Course (LTC) Practicum (4 crs.)

Provides military training to qualify students to enroll in advanced officer training (substitutes for first two years of on-campus instruction). Designed to challenge and develop the participants' ability to handle new and demanding situations. Practical aspects of leadership are stressed throughout program. Intensive course where one learns by doing. Meets four weeks at Fort Knox, Kentucky, during the summer months. Room, board, travel expenses, medical care, and pay are provided to all participants.

MIL331,332 Military Science III (2 crs.)

Emphasizes leadership and managerial skills development. Participants set well-defined goals and develop procedures for goal attainment. Meets three hours per week each semester; also requires participation in three 45-minute physical training sessions per week and weekend seminars. Offers a wide range of adventure training opportunities, both on and off campus. Prerequisite: Sucessfully met basic course requirements.

MIL350,351 Military Science IV (3 crs.)

Emphasizes leadership and managerial skills. Develops decision-making capabilities in military operations, logistics, and administration. Students will plan, organize, conduct, and evaluate selected training events. Meets four hours per week. Offers a variety of adventure training and leadership opportunities. Prerequisite: must meet basic course requirements.

MIL399 Seminar in Military Leadership Topics (3 crs)

Emphasizes leadership and managerial skills as they apply to the military contemporary operating environment. Develops decision making skills in military environment.  Students will meet with department head. Students will develop a topic to present and complete a comprehensive information paper on their chosen topic. Expect to write at least three analytic papers and one term paper. Prerequisite: Must gain Department Head of Military Science Department approval and have completed the MSIV curriculum).

Music (MUS)

MUS101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402 Brass Ensemble (1 cr.)

Select group of brass instrumentalists who perform in concert and on tour.

MUS103, 203, 303, 403, 409 Marching Band (1 cr.)

Group of musicians, silks and majorettes who perform at all home football games, several away games, parades, and exhibitions.

MUS104, 204, 304, 404 Concert Band (1 cr.)

Select group of wind and percussion instrumentalists who perform several concerts on campus and throughout the mid-Atlantic region.

MUS105, 106, 205, 206, 305, 306, 405, 406 Concert Choir (1 cr.)

Mixed vocal ensemble of 80-90 voices who perform a variety of literature from the different periods of music history. Activities include on-campus concerts and an annual tour.

MUS107, 108, 207, 208, 307, 308, 407, 408 Women's Chorale (1 cr.)

Women's chamber choir who perform a variety of treble-voice literature from the different periods of music history. Activities include on-campus concerts and an annual tour.

MUS110 Fundamental Music Skills (3 crs.)

Develops both knowledge and performance skills in music. Presents the rudiments of music including notation, scales and tonality, intervals and chords, rhythm and meter and phrases. Participants sight-sing, sing in harmony, perform simple piano accompaniments, learn to play a melody instrument, and read rhythm patterns. Regular performance proficiencies required. Content particularly geared to needs of aspiring elementary teachers.

MUS113, 114, 213, 214, 313, 314, 413, 414 Jazz Ensemble (1 cr.)

Group provides performing opportunities for students interested in jazz literature from the big band era to present. Several concerts on campus and in the mid-Atlantic region are performed each year.

MUS117, 118, 217, 218, 317, 318, 417, 418 Madrigal Singers (1 cr.)

Select vocal ensemble comprised of mixed voices. Ensemble performs music of the renaissance as well as works for chamber choir from various periods. They perform a holiday Madrigal dinner, two campus concerts, and an annual spring tour.

MUS121 Introduction to Music (3 crs.)

Assists the non-music major in developing an aesthetic sensitivity toward music. Objectives are to assist the student in becoming perceptively aware of the components of music and musical form; and to acquaint the student with great musical literature that makes up the nucleus of our Western heritage. Listening to music and developing listening skills emphasized. May have a concert attendance requirement.

MUS132, 133, 232, 233, 332, 333, 432, 433 University-Community Orchestra (1 cr.)

Group introduces members to significant masterworks of the western orchestral literature. The ensemble offers two or three concerts per year.

MUS140 Class Piano, Level I (3 crs.)

Group instruction and guided practice at the piano for students who have not studied piano, or who have studied less than one year. Students develop beginning skills in reading, technique, accompanying, and applying theoretical principles to the piano (harmonization, transposition, improvisation), and perform solo and ensemble works. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MUS141, 142, 241, 242, 341, 342, 441, 442 Inspirational Chorale (1 cr.)

Ensemble that performs the sacred music of the African-American culture. Styles included are traditional and contemporary gospel music, hymns, anthems, spirituals, and praise and worship. Activities include concerts on campus and periodic tours.

MUS150 Basic Guitar (3 crs.)

Studies guitar performance as both a folk and a classical instrument. Content includes playing technique, posture, instrument position and arm and hand position. Fundamentals of different (multiple) tuning, scales, chords, reading music notation and tablature, tonal and rhythm patterns, meter and phrasing addressed. Literature will include easy to medium-easy folk and classical material. Student will be able to play melodies and create accompaniments to melodies. Regular performance proficiencies required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MUS158, 159, 258, 259, 358, 359, 458, 459 Woodwind Ensemble (1 cr.)

Group is comprised of woodwind instrumentalists who perform in concert on campus and throughout the mid-Atlantic region.

MUS212 Music Theory I (3 crs.)

A first course for the student who wishes to increase knowledge of the elements of music: melody, harmony, rhythm, texture, and form. Designed to give students basic skills in the use of these elements through written and aural exercises, sight-singing, keyboard musicianship, analysis of short works, and simple composition. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MUS222 Music of the Renaissance and Baroque Periods (3 crs.)

Surveys the literature of the period from 1450 to 1750. Styles and characteristics of music of this time are studied with regard to their historical context. Active analytical listening to specified works emphasized. May have a concert attendance requirement. Prerequisite: MUS121 or permission of instructor.

MUS224 Music of the Classic and Romantic Eras (3 crs.)

Studies musical language and forms of the late 18th century as their characteristics evolved into those of the middle and late 19th century. Music of the two periods is considered as a continuous development of style and aesthetic values. Students listen to and analyze selected repertoire. May have a concert attendance requirement. Prerequisite: MUS121 or permission of instructor.

MUS226 20th Century Music (3 crs.)

Students gain insight, understanding and increased enjoyment from 20th century music through a study of selected works by its most influential composers. Focus on the main lines of development of 20th century music as reflected in its treatment of traditional components of music (melody, harmony, rhythm, timbre, form); and in its creation of new modes of musical expression. A listening repertoire of the century's most significant works and a knowledge of its most important composers is developed through live performances, recordings, and reading. May have a concert attendance requirement. Prerequisite: MUS121 or permission of instructor.

MUS227 Opera and Music Theatre (3 crs.)

Explores major points in the development of music drama from grand opera to musical comedy. When scheduling permits, class will attend a live production of an opera or musical comedy, either on campus or in a nearby city.

MUS260 Voice Class, Level I (3 crs.)

Studies the human voice in artistic singing, with practical application of the basic principles needed to prepare and perform: an understanding of the anatomy of the voice, proper breath support, tone quality, diction, and interpretation of solo vocal music of varied styles. Students identify and begin to develop a repertoire suitable for their voice types while they apply this knowledge of the fundamental principles through singing experiences in class. Music of the art song, folk and musical theater repertories emphasized, along with general care of the voice in all styles of singing. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MUS261 World Music (3 crs.)

Develops an understanding of music in the culture of selected countries. A wide range of videos and recordings assist in the analysis of musical styles, forms, and practices.

MUS270 Brass Instrument Class (3 crs.)

Opportunity for guided practice and study of the performance characteristics of the five brass instruments. Emphasizes perfecting performance skills while gaining some repertoire as appropriate to serve university and community music organizations. Examines various instruction books, teaching methods, and diagnostic techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MUS273 Woodwind Instrument (3 crs.)

Provides guided practice and study of the characteristics of the five main woodwind instruments. Emphasizes the development of performance skills on four instruments and the understanding of pedagogy for all woodwinds. Examines various instruction books, teaching methods, and diagnostic techniques. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MUS312 Music Theory II (3 crs.)

Builds upon the knowledge and skills developed in Music Theory I. Includes work in advanced harmony, form and analysis and beginning counterpoint through aural and written exercises, composition, and analysis of larger works. Prerequisite: MUS212 or equivalent.

MUS315 Music in the United States (3 crs.)

Presents major genres of American music from the colonial period to present. Presents a balanced perspective of the origins, culture and the development of American music. Unique American contributions such as minstrel music, Tin Pan Alley, musical theater, ragtime, blues, jazz, country, rock and art music are presented along with the music of Billings, Gottschalk, MacDowell, Ives, Copland, Bernstein, and others. Prerequisite: MUS121 or permission of instructor.

MUS330 Women in Music (3 crs.)

Surveys key musical accomplishments of women, especially in the elements of music historically dominated by men. Considers a variety of styles, with particular emphasis on secular and sacred art music and American jazz. Discussions may include critiques of concerts and topical films and research on the relationship between music and gender.

MUS340 Class Piano, Level II (3 crs.)

Builds upon skills developed in Class Piano I. Emphasizes more advanced solo and ensemble performance and advance skills in sight reading, harmonization (through an increased harmonic vocabulary), transposition, improvisation, and accompaniment.

MUS360 Voice Class, Level II (3 crs.)

Continues study of artistic singing with greater emphasis on solo performance. Explores vocal literature from the Renaissance lite song to 20th century art song. Student will expand his or her concept of the basic principles of singing and further develop his own performance practices. Prerequisite: MUS260 and/or permission of instructor.

MUS380 Basic Conducting (3 crs.)

Presents fundamental procedures of directing vocal and instrumental ensembles. Includes studies in score reading and audiation, meter and beat patterns, tempo and mood as they all relate to conducting gestures. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MUS393 Selected Topics in Music (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular offerings.

MUS427 Opera and Music Theatre (3 crs.)

Explores major points in the historical development of music drama from grand opera to musical comedy. When scheduling permits, class attends a live production of an opera or musical comedy either on campus or in a nearby city. Prerequisite: MUS121 or permission of instructor.

MUS461 World Music (3 crs.)

Studies folk music of selected countries as a product of the local culture, with analysis of musical styles, forms, and practices. Emphasis on listening to a wide range of recorded examples, utilizing the large folk record collection in the SU library.

MUS490 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

Philosophy (PHL)

PHL101 Introduction to Philosophy (3 crs.)

Acquaints student with range of subject matter and some of the methods employed in philosophy. Some basic questions concerning the nature of reality, knowledge, and morality are raised and alternative answers philosophers have given are analyzed and evaluated.

PHL102 Critical Thinking (3 crs.)

Course in informal logic aimed at developing the ability to analyze and evaluate short argumentative passages as well as entire articles. Arguments are found in a wide range of contexts while the articles are those typically appearing in philosophical periodicals and anthologies.

PHL105 Introduction to Ethical Theories and Problems (3 crs.)

Examines and assesses theories of right and wrong, good and bad; and attempts to apply such theories to some contemporary moral issues. Overall aims at developing the ability to formulate, analyze, and evaluate moral arguments and to work out a consistent reasoned moral personal viewpoint.

PHL210 Ethics (3 crs.)

Examines and assesses some recent approaches to ethics, including ethical theories and anti-theoretical viewpoints. Investigation of relation between recent ethical discourse and some contemporary moral issues included. Prerequisite: PHL105, Intro to Ethics or Permission of the Instructor.

PHL230 The Ethics of War and Terrorism (3 crs.)

Examines some basic ethical concepts and the natures of war and terrorism. The concepts are applied to some cases or examples of wars and terrorism. The course investigates whether there can be such a thing as an ethical war or act of terrorism.

PHL248 History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (3 crs.)

Examines the important philosophical themes up to approximately 1500. Among the philosophers examined are Parmenides, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Augustine, and Anselm. Goal is to appreciate the historical environment of these philosophers and to understand how their radically different world views relate to their environments.

PHL249 History of Modern Philosophy (3 crs.)

Examines important philosophical themes since approximately 1500. Among the philosophers studied are Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Focus on how philosophical skepticism, humanism, idealism, empiricism, and rationalism affected, and were effects of, the prevailing political, religious, and scientific elements of the times.

PHL285 Philosophy of Science (3 crs.)

Careful examination of concepts and methods used in the sciences with a view to their proper place in the structure of human knowledge. Examination encompasses both the rapidly developing fields of behavioral sciences and the more established physical sciences.

PHL295 Comparative Religions (3 crs.)

Considers the great religions of the world and their relationship to the cultures and civilizations of which they are a part, including a look at their position in the contemporary world. Study is made of the philosophy, theology, and ethical systems of these great faiths and of the lives of the great leaders and scholars of these religions. Investigates the literature they have produced.

PHL301 Formal Logic (3 crs.)

Deals with the study of argumentation and presenting of evidence by means of formal deductive systems such as propositional logic and predicate logic. Application of formal methods is supplemented by the study of philosophical problems about their effectiveness and limitations.

PHL332 Ethical Issues and Computer Technology (3 crs.)

Studies some of the approaches to ethics and their application to individual decisions and questions of social policy related to computer technology. Some specific issues discussed are professional ethics, property rights, privacy, and the social implications of computer technology.

PHL334 Concepts in Islam (3 crs.)

Investigates the religion of Islam and some of its essential concepts. Examines the different ways in which Muslims have interpreted and practiced the Islamic faith through analysis of theological, philosophical, historical, legal, political and literary texts. Particular attention given to the diversity of Islam as it has evolved over time. Specific topics are the status and role of the Prophet Muhammad, the nature and interpretation of the Quran, Islamic law, Sufism, and women and Islam.

PHL335 Concepts in Christianity (3 crs.)

Investigates the religion of Christianity and some of its essential concepts. Different ways Christians have interpreted their religion, from gnostics to American fundamentalists, are examined. Some developments in Christian doctrine investigated are: the God/Man debate, the problem of evil, the role of Christianity in government, the fate of the soul, and Christian ethics. Development of specific Christian traditions, such as Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, and Protestant Reformers will also be studied.

PHL336 Concepts in Buddhism (3 crs.)

Investigates the religion of Buddhism and some of its essential concepts. History, development, nature, and contemporary relevance of these essential concepts are examined. Concepts are considered from the perspective of the different forms of Buddhism, such as Zen, Theravada, and Mahayana. Included are avidya (spiritual ignorance), anatta (no-self), anicca (impermanence), dukkha (suffering), and nirvana (extinction, enlightenment).

PHL337 Existentialism (3 crs.)

Aims to understand and appreciate contemporary expressions of existentialism. Examines historical sources of this world view, including Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, and Husserl. Within this framework, the richly rewarding works of Sartre and others can be developed meaningfully. Given the nontraditional tone of existentialism, looks beyond theoretical writings to the existential fiction of Kafka, de Maupassant, de Beauvoir, Hemingway, and Camus.

PHL393 Selected Topics in Philosophy (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses. Prerequisite: Instructor's option.

PHL490 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

Provides the opportunity for the department to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses. Prerequisite: Instructor's option.

Physics (PHY)

PHY105 Problem Solving in the Sciences (3 crs.)

Provides a transition into the physical sciences and engineering programs. Utilizes a structured approach to enhance the student's ability to read and master physics subject matter and solve associated problems, particularly word problems. Develops a facility with microcomputer operation through an integrated problem solving approach. Subject matter content deliberately chosen so challenge is in the problem-solving aspects. Prerequisite: Competence in high school algebra and trigonometry or pre-calculus math taken concurrently.

PHY108 Astronomy (3 crs.)

Introductory, non-mathematical course on astronomy and astrophysics. Main goal is to provide a qualitative but extensive survey of what is known about planets, stars, galaxies, black holes, pulsars, quasars, and the origin of the universe. Topics such as Newton's laws of motion, gravitation, radiation spectra, and thermodynamics are discussed and treated quantitatively.

PHY110 Physics for Society (3 crs.)

Introductory non-mathematical course about modern physics with emphasis on those topics having great influence upon our present society. Topics typically covered include space travel, Einstein's relativity, radioactivity, nuclear energy, elementary particles of matter, solid state properties of matter, lasers, and low temperature phenomena.

PHY115 Physical Science—A Laboratory Approach (3 crs.)

Introduction to the physical sciences, course is laboratory oriented and provides for individual differences and abilities. Emphasis on developing awareness in observation, resourcefulness in gathering data, and analysis of experimental evidence. Experience is provided for the handling of simple equipment appropriate to the elementary classroom.

PHY121 Introductory Physics I - Lecture (3 crs.)

Introductory course in dynamics, thermodynamics, and kinetic theory. Some topics introduced are the description of motion, Newton's laws of motion, equilibrium conditions, concept of work and energy, momentum, periodic phenomena, rotational motion, the concepts of heat and temperature, kinetic theory of gases and the behavior of real and ideal gases. Origin, characteristics, transmission, and detection of sound also studied. Strongly recommended students take concurrently PHY123. Prerequisite: Competence in high school algebra and trigonometry or pre-calculus math taken concurrently.

PHY122 Introductory Physics II - Lecture (3 crs.)

Introductory course in electricity and magnetism, optics, atomic physics and nuclear physics. Topics introduced are behavior of electric charges, the electric field, D.C. circuits resistance, capacitance, inductance, electromagnetic induction, geometric and physical optics, wave and particle analysis of light, optical spectra, X-rays, atomic structure, and radioactivity. Strongly recommended students take concurrently PHY125. Prerequisite: PHY121 or competence in high school algebra and trigonometry or pre-calculus math taken concurrently.

PHY123 Introductory Physics I - Laboratory (1 cr.)

Provides an experimental approach to concepts developed in its lecture counterpart PHY121. Two periods/week. Co-requisite or prerequisite: PHY121.

PHY125 Introductory Physics II - Laboratory (1 cr.)

Provides an experimental approach to concepts developed in its lecture counterpart PHY122. Two periods/week. Co-requisite or prerequisite: PHY122.

PHY150 Engineering Graphics (3 crs.)

Presents graphical representations used by draftsmen, technicians, engineers, and other persons in industry. Student will acquire the fundamentals of standard graphical practices. Includes theory of multiview and isometric projection, auxiliaries, sections and standard dimensioning practices, as well as skill in drawing and the proper drafting room procedures. Two double periods lab and lecture/week.

PHY205 Intermediate Physics I (4 crs.)

Introductory study of the laws of mechanics governing motion of objects acted upon by forces. Beginning spent on kinematics (the study of motion in terms of position, velocity, and acceleration). Newton's laws, which determine how forces generate motion, studied next. Remainder spent on direct applications of Newton's laws. These include the description of motion in terms of energy, the description of collisions and a brief study of rotational dynamics. Also presents a brief introduction to some of the elementary concepts involved in theories of special and general relativity. Vectors and differential calculus used. Three periods lecture and two periods lab/week. Prerequisite: MAT211 (or equivalent course) may be taken concurrently.

PHY308 Modern Physics (4 crs.)

Designed to present an elementary but rigorous treatment of fundamentals of physics of the 20th century. Covers the Theory of Special Relativity, early 20th century experiments showing need for a revision of classical physics, and the ensuing development of quantum mechanics. A sequential and detailed study of the one dimensional Schroedinger Equation presented. Three periods lecture and two periods lab/week. Prerequisites: PHY313 (or its equivalent) and MAT213 (at least concurrently).

PHY313 Intermediate Physics II(4 crs.)

Introductory study of electricity and magnetism. Begins with study of stationary charges and introduction of electric field, electric potential, capacitance and Gauss's law. Charges in motion then introduced, leading into topics on magnetism, induction, Ampere's law, and Faraday's law. Some D.C. and A.C. circuit analysis covered. Vectors, differential calculus, and integral calculus are used. Three periods lecture and two periods lab/week. Prerequisites: PHY205 (or equivalent course) and MAT212 (or equivalent course). The latter may be taken concurrently.

PHY314 Intermediate Physics III (4 crs.)

Introduction to wave motion, geometrical and physical optics, and heat and thermodynamics. Matter waves are studied with applications to the science of sound. Study of electromagnetic waves leads into various aspects of the nature of light and optical instruments. Concludes with a study of heat, temperature, the kinetic theory of gases, and the laws of thermodynamics. Three periods lecture and two periods lab/week. Prerequisites: PHY205 (or its equivalent) and MAT212 (at least concurrently).

PHY325 Semiconductor Devices (4 crs.)

Lecture/Lab course covers modern topics in Solid State Physics with an emphasis on semiconductor devices and device fabrication. Topics covered include the free electron gas, carrier modeling, the band model, pn-junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors, field effect transistors and optoelectronic devices. The techniques for fabricating and characterizing semiconductor devices are also covered in both the lecture and the laboratory. Prerequisites: PHY308 and MAT322, or CHM362 and PHY442, or permission of the instructor.

PHY330 Transitional Mechanics (4 crs.)

Designed for second semester sophomores in physics and a precursor to Mathematical Physics. Also useful for mathematics and chemistry majors. Provides a bridge between freshmen-level and upper-division mechanics. Emphasis on development of linear algebra methods (vectors, determinants, matrices, linear equations and transformations, fourier series) with a strong correlation to physical systems through applications to Special Relativity (with 4-vectors) and to simple harmonic oscillators: undamped, damped, driven and coupled. Three periods lecture and two periods lab/week. Prerequisites: PHY313 and PHY314 and MAT213 (at least concurrently).

PHY390 Physics Internship (3 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

PHY393 Selected Topics in Physics (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

PHY400 Mechanics (4 crs.)

Intermediate course in the treatment of Newton's laws of motion, vector analysis, and rectilinear and curvilinear motion in a plane. Further study in areas of statics and dynamics, including concurrent and non-concurrent forces, movements and torques, energy, rotational motion, moments of inertia and oscillatory motion included in laboratory and problem solving periods. Three periods lecture and two periods lab/week. Prerequisites: MAT 213, MAT 318, MAT 322 (at least concurrently) and PHY 314.

PHY401 Electricity and Magnetism (4 crs.)

Advanced course in general electricity and magnetism. Electric and magnetic fields, D.C. and A.C. circuits, capacitance, inductance, electromotive force and electrical instruments are among the topics developed. Three periods lecture and two periods lab/week. Prerequisites: MAT 213, MAT 318, MAT 322 (at least concurrently), PHY 313.

PHY410 Heat and Thermodynamics (4 crs.)

Intermediate course in heat. Basic concepts and principles are developed more intensely in the study of properties of gases and in thermodynamics. Some topics studied are temperature measurements, expansivity, specific heats, thermal conductivity of solids and liquids, thermal properties of gases, change of phase, and heat engines. Three periods lecture and two periods lab/week. Prerequisites: MAT 213, MAT 318, MAT 322 (at least concurrently), PHY 314.

PHY415 Optics (4 crs.)

Both geometrical and physical optics and applications. Optical instruments, wave propagation, interference diffraction, polarization, and atomic molecular spectra are studied. Spectrascopes, spectrometers, polariscopes, photometers, and interferometers are some of the instruments used. Three periods lecture and two periods lab/week. Prerequisites: MAT 213, MAT 318, MAT 322 (at least concurrently), PHY 314.

PHY430 Nuclear Physics (4 crs.)

Introductory treatment of nuclear structure, quantum mechanics, elementary particles, nuclear reactions, radiation measurement, detection and safety, particle accelerators, and reactors. Lab experiments include statistics of counting, range of alpha particles, absorption of alpha, beta, and gammas, half-life, neutron induced activity. Three periods lecture and two periods lab/week. Prerequisite: PHY308.

PHY441 Quantum Mechanics (3 crs.)

Introduction to physical concepts and mathematical formulations of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. Enables a detailed study of the Schrodinger Equation and its properties. The Schrodinger Equation is solved exactly for the particle in a square well potential, the simple harmonic oscillator, and the hydrogen atom. Both perturbation theory and variational calculation are developed as methods for handling more complicated systems. Spin is introduced as an ad hoc concept and the properties of simple magnetic systems studied. Heavy emphasis on applications to simple systems. Three periods lecture periods/week. Prerequisite: PHY308, MAT 318, MAT 322 (at least concurrently).

PHY442 Mathematical Physics (4 crs.)

Fairly rigorous development of mathematical techniques widely used in upper division physics courses. Topics generally include functions of many variables and partial differentiation, infinite series and expansion techniques, curvilinear coordinates, vector calculus and a study of ordinary and partial differential equations often encountered in physics. Three periods lecture periods/week. Prerequisites: MAT 213, MAT 318, MAT 322 (at least concurrently), PHY 205.

PHY450 Quantum Materials (4 crs.)

Lecture/lab course covers material topics in modern solid state physics with an emphasis on applications to nanotechnology. Topics covered include carbon nanotubes, organic conductors and semiconductors, photonic crystals and microfluidies. Topics in Biological and self-assembled systems including, biomolecular motors, motor proteins and the organic-to silicone interface are also covered. Techniques for manipulating and characterizing materials at the nanoscale are also covered in both the lecture and the laboratory. Prerequisites: PHY308 and MAT322, or CHM362 and PHY442, or permission of the instructor.

PHY490 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

Political Science (PLS)

PLS100 U.S. Government and Politics (3 crs.)

Foundation for understanding the philosophical heritage, constitutional principles, civil rights and liberties, and the formal and informal institutions that form the U.S. government. Focus on political factors and dynamics of democracy, the Constitution, political parties, interest groups, the media, elections, and the branches of U.S. government.

PLS141 Introduction to International Politics (3 crs.)

Deals with the nation state, interstate relations and the international political system in the 20th century. Attention given to the formulation and execution of foreign policy; political, economic, military and cultural interactions among states; and the organization and maintenance of the international community.

PLS201 Introduction to Political Science (3 crs.)

Examines the philosophy behind the discipline of political science and the different fields within political science. Introduces political science theories and theory building. Examines political behavior, political structures, decision-making, and the foundations of political systems. Provides tools to conduct literature reviews, access information, assess political developments, and develop and critique theories and research.

PLS231 State and Local Government (3 crs.)

Study of the organization and functions of government at the state, county, township, and city levels. State-local and national-local relations are stressed. Prerequisite: PLS100 or permission of instructor.

PLS251 Introduction to Comparative Politics (3 crs.)

Cross-national study of the principles, forms, and functions of democratic, fascist, and communist governments. Political parties and electoral systems, legislative representation, federalism, constitutional order, bureaucracy, and dictatorship are examined in the functional and comparative manner. Prerequisite: PLS100 or permission of instructor.

PLS271 Introduction to Public Administration (3 crs.)

Basic introductory course in field of management in governmental offices. Includes organization of executive offices, controls over administration, budgeting and personnel procedure,s and methods to achieve administrative objectives. Prerequisite: PLS100 or permission of instructor.

PLS291 Contemporary Issues (3 crs.)

Focuses on political or policy issues. Covers background of the issues, current developments, and prospects for change. Topics vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: PLS100 or permission of instructor.

PLS300 Advanced American Government and Public Policy (3 crs.)

In-depth description of the structure, functions, and public policy making involvement of U.S. governmental institutions. Focuses on legislative, executive, administrative, and judicial institutions and process, the impact of interest groups, political parties, public opinion, and federalism. Examines the policy-making process, both in general and with reference to specific types of public policies. Prerequisite: PLS100.

PLS301 Political Science Research Methods (3 crs.)

Evaluates the process of research in political science, focusing on research design; discusses ethical issues in research; trains students in techniques of data collection and processing; provides computer-based training in quantitative analysis and interpretation of statistics. Prerequisite: MAT117 and PLS201 or PLS271.

PLS302 Public Policy Analysis (3 crs.)

Examines the policy making process(es) and implications for the conduct of policy analysis. Reviews the policy implementation process(es) and implications for the conduct of policy analysis. Focuses upon specific quantitative and qualitative policy analysis/program evaluation techniques. Prerequisite: PLS301.

PLS311 The Legislative Process (3 crs.)

Analyzes the powers and rules of legislatures and legislators in modern democracies with special reference to the American Congress. Emphasis placed on the decision-making process, including internal and external pressures upon legislators. Prerequisite: PLS100 or permission of instructor.

PLS312 The American Presidency (3 crs.)

Analyzes the structure and functions of the American institutionalized presidency, including an examination of the power and roles of the president and the decision-making process. Prerequisite: PLS100 or permission of instructor.

PLS313 The Judicial Process (3 crs.)

Describes the operation of the federal and state court systems; evaluates the processing of cases; examines the mechanisms of judicial recruitment; discusses the impact of decisions on the political process.

PLS321 Public Opinion and Political Media (3 crs.)

Deals with the nature of public opinion and its role in the political process. Explores how the American political system operates in an age of mass communication, how citizens and politicians are affected by the media, and how the media influences the political process. Prerequisite: PLS100 or permission of instructor.

PLS322 Interest Groups in American Society (3 crs.)

Studies the origins, organizations, opportunities, tactics of interest groups (pressure groups) and an assessment of the legitimacy of their role in democratic and quasi-democratic politics. Investigates problems connected with the existing incentive to join groups, the iron law of oligarchy, access points to government decision-making functions to private interest pressure groups. Prerequisite: PLS100 or permission of instructor.

PLS323 Campaigns, Elections & Political Parties (3 crs.)

Explores operation of the electoral system both theoretically and practically, and examines the roles of citizens in the electoral process. Reviews the development and status of political parties in American society. Prerequisite: PLS100 or permission of instructor.

PLS324 Women in American Politics (3 crs.)

Intended and designed for males and females, examines the changing political role of women in the United States and compares women across American subcultures. Investigates political attitudes and values, voting behavior, and recruitment of women for political leadership.

PLS325 African American Politics (3 crs.)

Examines the relationship between African American citizens and the American political system in order to gain a broader prospective of the American political process. Representation and strategies for empowerment discussed. Provide consideration of the behavior of African Americans within the political institutional settings and at various levels of government. Also addresses the positive and negative impact of the Civil Rights Movement, the Supreme Court, and Affirmative Action as it relates to the integration of African Americans in the American political system. Prerequisite: PLS100 or ETH101.

PLS331 City Politics and Administration (3 crs.)

Studies the development, structure, and political operation of city government in the United States, including the interactions between cities, states, and the national government. Analyzes common city problems and public policy solutions. Prerequisite: PLS100 or permission of instructor.

PLS332 Federal–State–Local Relations (3 crs.)

Fosters understanding of the continuity, current dimensions, and interrelated nature of the issues characterizing American governmental relations and the feasibility of various approaches offered for their assuagement. Prerequisite: PLS231 or permission of instructor.

PLS341 International Law and Organization (3 crs.)

Analyzes the role and dynamics of international law and organizational political system. Includes the scope and nature of international law and organization, the concepts and procedures for maintaining international peace and security, substantive rules, and international law and the function of the United Nations and regional organizations. Prerequisite: PLS141 or permission of instructor.

PLS342 American Foreign Policy (3 crs.)

Study of the principles of American foreign policy including process and policy formulation and execution. Roles of the president, Congress and the State Department and other governmental agencies are investigated. Prerequisite: PLS100 or PLS141 or permission of instructor.

PLS356 Politics of Developing Regions (3 crs.)

Examines the forces that shaped and continue to impact the governments and politics of the Third World. Emphasizes two lines of inquiry: colonialism and patterns of post-colonial relations between north and south; and the challenges faced by Third World nations in their efforts for political, economic and social advancement in an increasingly integrated world. Prerequisite: PLS141.

PLS357 Group Mobilization and State Change (3 crs.)

Comparative analysis of efforts by minority groups in the developing world to mobilize for state change. Analyzes separatist movements based on ethnic, linguistic, racial, religious, and caste identities and political movements whose goal is to change a government's policy agenda. Focuses on topics such as ethnonationalism, religious separatism, environmental justice, women's uplift, economic justice, global integration, and human rights. Prerequisite: PLS100.

PLS361 Political Theory from Ancient Times through the 19th Century (3 crs.)

Surveys the major political ideas of the world from ancient times to the present. Consists of critical appraisal of the ideas and thinkers and their impact on modern political institutions. Prerequisite: PLS100 or permission of instructor.

PLS362 20th Century Political Ideologies (3 crs.)

Considers the major ideologies and -isms of the Western World that have arisen or have acquired political significance during the 20th century. Examines ideologies and -isms in terms of the root political concepts and theories they express and in terms of the interplay between the ideas and the political environment of major ideologies. Prerequisite: PLS100 or permission of instructor.

PLS363 American Political Thought (3 crs.)

Critical study of the political ideas underlying and associated with personalities and institutions in the United States from colonial times.

PLS365 Constitutional Law: The Federal System (3 crs.)

Analyzes leading American constitutional decisions relating to national legislative, executive, and judicial powers and to the position of the states. Prerequisite: PLS100 or permission of instructor.

PLS366 Constitutional Law: First Amendment Freedoms (3 crs.)

Examines body of constitutional law associated with the First Amendment including establishment and free exercise of religion; and the freedom of speech, press, and assembly. Discusses issues surrounding the freedom of expression and the right to privacy.

PLS367 Constitutional Law: Criminal Law and Equal Protection (3 crs.)

Examines body of constitutional law associated with the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Eighth Amendments and evaluates the protection of criminal defendants' rights in the United States today. Discusses case law surrounding the Fourteenth Amendment's Equal Protection Clause.

PLS371 Public Management (3 crs.)

Studies the principles and functions of public managers. Covers traditional as well as new patterns of organization theory and management and the fundamentals and theory of planning. Prerequisite: PLS271 or permission of instructor.

PLS372 Public Personnel Administration (3 crs.)

Studies the development and functions of public personnel administration. Roles of various levels of management in the development and implementation of personnel policy and administration covered as well as those of the functional specialist. Impact of American culture and public policy upon public personnel administration also emphasized. Prerequisite: PLS271 or permission of instructor.

PLS373 Public Financial Administration (3 crs.)

Deals with fiscal policy determination, accountability, and management of financial resources. Administrative and political aspects of the budgetary process covered. Appropriate references made to the impact of federal programs upon state and local governments and the fiscal relations existing between various levels of government. Prerequisite: PLS271 or permission of instructor.

PLS374 Public Service Ethics (3 crs.)

Explores the historical and specific contemporary issues concerning ethics in the public sector. Ethical problems and their relationship to politics surveyed. Emphasizes ethical questions encountered by individuals who enter public service and will evaluate attempts to enforce ethical conduct among public servants by statutes and codes of conduct. Prerequisite: Nine hours in political science or permission of instructor. PHL105 and/or PHL210 recommended.

PLS381 Principles of Labor Relations (3 crs.)

Introduction to labor-management relations in private and public sectors. Topics such as domestic industrial relations systems; institutional labor movements; negotiation, administration and contents of labor agreements; contract dispute resolution; and labor relations abroad may be included. Prerequisite: PLS271 or MGT340. Students taking PLS381 cannot enroll in MGT342 and vice versa.

PLS384 Regional and Urban Planning (3 crs.)

Introduces the fundamentals of planning and the direction it is taking in the second half of the 20th century. Practical situations studied in the locality of the university. Field studies also pursued. Prerequisite: PLS231 or permission of instructor.

PLS391 Selected Topics in Political Science (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

PLS395 Internship I (3 crs.)

PLS396 Internship II (3 crs.)

PLS397 Internship III (3-6 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

PLS399 Senior Seminar (3 crs.)

Required senior capstone course. Review of important concepts and advances in the field undertaken through original readings and discussion. Students complete an independent research project that integrates knowledge of the content and methods specific to the study of political systems and processes. Evaluation includes a senior thesis, oral presentation, and career development statement with resume. Prerequisites: PLS100, PLS201, PLS300, PLS301 plus two (2) additional courses in major, with senior standing.

PLS431 Pennsylvania Local Government (3 crs.)

Concerns the structure and administrative functions of local governments in Pennsylvania. Extensive emphasis placed on analyzing local governmental functions and problems emanating from the jurisdictions' political, social, and economic environments. Prerequisite: 9 hours in political science or permission of instructor.

PLS501 Organizational Theory and Behavior (3 crs.)

Examines organization theory relevant to the administration and leadership in complex organizations. Focus is on topics of bureaucracy and development of administrative thought; human behavior in organizations including individual motivation, group and interpersonal dynamics, and leadership modes; organization structure, process, and dynamics; organizational development and change; and emerging perspectives in the field.

PLS502 Human Resources Management (3 crs.)

Case study course reviewing personnel administration integratively as an administrative, behavioral, and technical area. Role of the line manager in personnel administration is covered, as well as the technical roles of central personnel agency and the operating personnel office.

PLS503 Foundations of Public Budgeting and Finance (3 crs.)

Provides knowledge base required to understand the principles underlying public sector budgeting and decision making. Public sector decision models are explained and the theory of public goods examined in depth. Evolving techniques for satisfying public needs through the private sector (e.g. privatization) are investigated and outcomes analyzed.

PLS504 Ethics for Public Service Managers (3 crs.)

Examines specific contemporary ethical concerns in the public sector and the ethical conduct required by statutes and codes of conduct. Appropriate case studies discussed, emphasizing the constantly changing standards in the public sector.

PLS511 State Government (3 crs.)

Studies state governments in the American federal system and analyzes state government institutions and processes with special reference to Pennsylvania.

PLS512 Intergovernmental Relations and Programs (3 crs.)

Examines the developing area of intergovernment relations among federal, state, and local governments. Special emphasis placed upon the work of the Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations and implementation where feasible by state and local governments.

PLS521 Collective Bargaining and Labor Relations in the Public Sector (3 crs.)

Reviews whole area of relations between public employees and public employers and impact on public personnel administration. Some guide-lines used for past contractual arrangements are covered.

PLS551 Planning and Public Policy (3 crs.)

Examines relationship between the planning process and public policy including the inputs into the development of public policy as well as legal and other constraints. Using the current national budget priorities as a national plan and in-depth examination and reconciliation of these priorities is carried out in view of political, social, and economic constraints.

PLS552 Seminar in Urban-Rural Planning (3 crs.)

Comprises an exhaustive study of planning concepts and processes used at state and local levels with special emphasis on Pennsylvania. Theories of comprehensive planning in the United States are analyzed and compared. The constitutional bases for planning are examined as well as the new trends toward planning programming budgeting systems (PPBS).

PLS561 Administrative Law (3 crs.)

Study of the law concerning the powers and procedures of administrative agencies. These governmental bodies which affect the rights of private and public parties through either adjudication or rule making are compared to and contrasted with the judicial, legislative and executive processes using the case method.

PLS591 Selected Topics (3 crs.)

PLS601 Research Methods (3 crs.)

Survey of the research process including preparation of a research design, use of theoretical framework, and testing of hypothesis by gathering and analyzing data. Recommend the student complete this course as early in the graduate program as possible.

PLS603 Public Policy Analysis (3 crs.)

Briefly examines the policy making and policy implementation processes as they relate to the analysis of public policies. Major focus is upon results-oriented management techniques, and a number of specific quantitative policy analysis techniques.

PLS605 Applied management Techniques in Public Administration (3 crs.)

Requires students to demonstrate their ability to successfully resolve workplace situations by utilizing principles and concepts of public management as presented in the core and elective courses of the M.P.A curriculum. Employing the case study method, and additional reading, the principal focus requires the students as individuals and in teams to work with the development and implementation of public policy. Course takes an application and problem-solving approach designed to develop the practical management skills required in the current public administration workplace.

PLS611 Internship I (3 crs.)

Opportunity to practice public administration theory and concepts as participant and an observer in the process. Placement on a limited basis in a government or nonprofit activity enhances the student's preparation in the field.

PLS612 Internship II (3 crs.)

Opportunity to practice public administration theory and concepts as participant and an observer in the process. Placement on a limited basis in a government or nonprofit activity enhances the student's preparation in the field.

PLS621 Thesis I (3 crs.)

PLS622 Thesis II (3 crs.)

 

Psychology (PSY)

PSY101 General Psychology (3 crs.)

Survey of major principles, research results, and applications of contemporary psychology. Topics traditionally covered include learning, memory, perception, motivation, personality and social behavior. Not open to psychology majors.

PSY102 Foundations of Psychology (3 crs.)

Primarily for psychology majors and designed to prepare for subsequent upper division courses in psychology. Topics include developmental processes, motivation, emotion, brain-behavior relationship, conditioning and learning, perception, memory, personality, psychopathology, psychotherapy, and social psychology. Prerequisite: Psychology major status or permission of instructor.

PSY105 Research Design and Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences I (3 crs.)

Primarily for psychology majors and the first in a two-semester sequence of courses in research design and statistics as applied to the behavioral sciences. Topics include background research skills, hypothesis development, research methodology, descriptive statistics (using calculator and computer), and an introduction to probability. Prerequisite: PSY101 or PSY102. Restricted to psychology majors or B.S.Ed. majors.

PSY205 Research Design and Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences II (3 crs.)

Designed to provide a collection of principles, methods and strategies useful in planning, designing, writing, and evaluating research studies in the behavioral sciences. Topics include research designs, measurements, hypothesis testing, statistical significance, estimation and the analysis of data. Use of computer statistical packages to analyze data emphasized. Prerequisite: PSY105 or permission of instructor. Restricted to psychology majors.

PSY235 Conditioning and Learning (3 crs.)

Designed to teach the basic principles of conditioning and learning. Emphasis on classical and operant conditioning in laboratory research and applied situations. Prerequisite: PSY101 or PSY102.

PSY240 Psychology of Personality (3 crs.)

Basic theories concerning the structure, dynamics, and development of personality are discussed. Viewpoints covered include psychodynamic cognitive, humanistic and behavioral approaches to understanding personality. Prerequisite: PSY101 or PSY102.

PSY265 Childhood and Adolescence (3 crs.)

Provides understanding and appreciation of the interrelated growth processes of child development. Includes physical, interpersonal, social, peer, self-developmental, emotional, and cognitive processes. Prerequisite: PSY101 or PSY102.

PSY270 Social Psychology (3 crs.)

Examines theories, research, and everyday life in an effort to understand how people perceive and influence each other. Prerequisite: PSY101 or PSY102.

PSY301 Experimental Psychology (3 crs.)

Introduction to the execution of planned laboratory experiments. Deals with problems in designing experiments, data collection and analysis, and the writing of research reports. Experiments may be conducted in the areas of sensation, perception, motivation and learning. Prerequisite: PSY205 or permission of instructor. Restricted to psychology majors.

PSY305 Applied Research Methods in Psychology (3 crs.)

Opportunity to examine and conduct research in psychology using such non-experimental research methods as naturalistic observation, survey, correlational, field study, and program evaluation. Statistics, including the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) available on the campus computer. Prerequisite: PSY205.

PSY320 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 crs.)

Explores the relationship between biological and psychological processes by examining nervous system anatomy and physiology as it relates to problems of emotion, motivation, cognition, perception, and mental illness. Prerequisite: PSY101 or PSY102 or permission of instructor.

PSY325 Psychology of Human Cognition (3 crs.)

Designed to teach the underlying principles of human cognition (i.e., attention, thinking, perception, comprehension, memory), experimentation and research in cognition, application of cognitive principles to applied settings (i.e., schools). Prerequisite: PSY101 or PSY102.

PSY330 Abnormal Psychology (3 crs.)

Characteristics, causes and treatment of the major types of maladaptive behavior are discussed. Topics include current mental disorder classification system and contemporary forms of psychotherapy. Prerequisite: PSY101 or PSY102.

PSY335 Psychology of Social Influence (3 crs.)

Introduction to principles of social influence. These principles applied to understanding topics such as attitude change, recruitment and retention in religious cults and other cult-like groups, product advertising, political advertising, fundraising techniques, public service campaigns, initiations and group loyalty, brainwashing. Prerequisite: PSY270 or permission of the instructor.

PSY340 Introduction to Clinical Psychology (3 crs.)

Includes discussion of how clinical psychologists assess symptoms of psychopathology, diagnose mental disorders, conceptualize clients' symptom reports and develop treatment plans. Students not taught how to do assessment or psychotherapy but will learn about assessment and psychotherapy approaches used by clinical psychologists. Purpose is to provide opportunity to integrate material learned in other courses and to learn more about the field of clinical psychology. Prerequisite: PSY240 and PSY330.

PSY352 Adulthood and Aging (3 crs.)

Providing the student with an understanding of the main developmental processes occurring during the stages of adulthood and old age. Discusses theories of aging, social implications of the recent extensions in longevity, age-related physiological processes and their implications in terms of physical and mental health, changes in cognition, personality, and psychopathology. Also discusses the impact of important life events and developmental tasks on the individual. Thus, marriage and divorce, work and retirement, and finally death, dying, and bereavement, will be discussed, and major empirical results will be presented and analyzed. Prerequisites: PSY101 and PSY102.

PSY355 Psychology of the Exceptional Child (3 crs.)

Psychological investigation into the nature of human differences as manifested in children and youth. Concerned with scientific study of physical, intellectual, social, and emotional development in unique children, as well as individual, institutional, and cultural response to the exceptional child. Cultural, social, and scientific procedures for the definition of deference emphasized. Treatment and educational systems touched upon. Prerequisite: PSY101 or PSY102.

PSY361 Psychology of Group Interaction (3 crs.)

Surveys and analyzes psychological constructs, research, and principles of group interaction. Through participation and observation of face-to-face groups, implications are drawn for work groups in education, industry, and other social situations. Prerequisites: PSY101 or PSY102 and junior status or permission of instructor.

PSY365 Multicultural Psychology (3 crs.)

Focuses on recent psychological research concerning understanding the differences within the United States in the way we think, feel, and behave. Designed to introduce psychological issues concerning gender, cultural values, race/ethnicity, religion, individualism-collectivism, self-identity, group identity and group conflict, environmental ecology, culture and development, culture and communication/relationships. Discussions are geared toward promoting an understanding of human experience in a multicultural context. Satisfies a diversity requirement for all students. Prerequisite: PSY101 or PSY102.

PSY374 Advanced Research in Psychology I (3 crs.)

Psychology majors provided with opportunity to engage in a research project in psychology. Typically includes the selection of a topic, background research on topic, and writing of a research proposal. The stages of collection of data and analysis of data may be included, depending on the nature of the project. Prerequisites: PSY301 or PSY305 and permission of instructor.

PSY375 Advanced Research in Psychology II (3 crs.)

Second of a two-semester sequence of courses designed to provide psychology majors with an opportunity to engage in research. Typically, in this second course, students gather data, do appropriate statistical analysis, and make an oral presentation of the project and its results. Students encouraged to attend scientific conventions and submit proposals to conventions for poster and/or paper presentations.

PSY 379 Capstone Seminar in Psychology (3 crs.)

Capstone seminar designed to allow students to apply a number of theoretical approaches and models to real-life examples and to familiarize students with some of the current debates in the field of psychology. Based in large part on group work that will be conducted by students in an attempt to explore in more depth issues and topics originally discussed in class in relatively broad terms. Short papers and oral presentations provide opportunity for integration, application and polishing of writing and oral communication skills. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status and at least 15 credits from psychology courses.

PSY381 Honor Thesis I (3 crs.)

First of a two-semester sequence of courses designed to provide students in the Psychology Honors Program an opportunity to develop and conduct a major research project.

PSY382 Honor Thesis II (3 crs.)

Second of a two-semester course designed to provide students in the Psychology Honors Program an opportunity to develop and conduct a major research project.

PSY384 Psychology of Person-to-Person Interaction (3 crs.)

Focuses on the development of basic helping skills. Topics include modes of response, creating a positive relationship, problem solving, effective feedback, and applications to special populations. Skill enhancing activities include role playing, video taping, and small group exercises. For psychology majors only.

PSY385,386,389 Internship in Psychology (3 crs. each)

Provides a variety of internship experiences that provide opportunity to broaden the psychology major's preparatory background. Contact the internship coordinator of the department for further information.

PSY393 Selected Topics in Psychology (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

PSY395 Seminar in Selected Topics (3 crs.)

Studies concepts and research in areas of psychology not covered by the regular courses of study. Areas covered will be those in which instructors have special expertise and there is a special student request. Prerequisites: PSY101 or PSY102, senior standing and permission of instructor.

PSY397 Human Cognitive Development (3 crs.)

Presents a life span approach to study of human development with an emphasis on cognitive processes in infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Purpose is to familiarize the student with basic concepts, models, theories and research in the field of cognitive development. Models of gene-environment interaction, Piagetian, Neo-Piagetian, Information-Processing approaches and Post-formal approaches discussed, as well as their application to perception, memory, language, intelligence and wisdom development. Introduces practical applications of current theories of cognitive human development. Recommended to have prior courses in Developmental Psychology and/or Cognition. Prerequisites: PSY101 or PSY102.

PSY410 Psychology and Women (3 crs.)

Focus on views of women in early psychology, then turns to an in-depth analysis of the psychological aspects of issues affecting women. Topics include: current and historical psychological theories about women and sex differences; achievement motivation; women and mental illness; psychological aspects of menstruation; female sexuality; women's romantic relationships and friendships; reactions to victimization (rape, domestic violence; obsessive relationships and stalking, sexual abuse); psychological consequences of women's physical appearance; body image and eating disorders; prejudice and discrimination against women; consequences of inclusive vs. noninclusive language; improving communication and cooperation between men and women. Prerequisite: PSY101.

PSY420 Health Psychology (3 crs.)

Study of psychological processes that help and hinder the maintenance of health. Health is viewed in a framework of positive aspects beyond just the absence of pathology. Holistic and allopathic systems are compared and seen as complimentary. The organism is considered as a process of coordinated hierarchical self-regulating structures. Maintenance of proper psychophysical balance is seen as a means for management of stress and the immune system. Opportunity to practice some wellness skills.

PSY422 The Social Psychology of Aging (3 crs.)

Using a social psychological approach, course covers a variety of topics in aging such as perceived attractiveness of older people, age stereotypes, and relationships over the lifespan. Other topics investigate cross-cultural, intergenerational and intergroup issues. A special section understanding the social psychological factors involved in being victims of conartists presented.

PSY430 Sensation and Perception (3 crs.)

Includes study of human senses, sensory coding, neurological basis of sensation, perceptual processes in vision and hearing, perceptual development, theories of perceptual experience, adaptation level theory, person perception, self-perception, and the physiological basis of perception. Some experiments performed in the area of sensation and perception.

PSY432 The Psychology of Computers and the Internet (3 crs.)

Examines the psychological implications of computers and their related Internet technologies on social interactions and behaviors. Topics include the influence of technology on self-concept and identities, norm development in CMC and virtual communities, cyber-support, Internet addiction, the influence of gender and status in on-line social interactions and the digital divide. Format a combination of discussion, using classic and current articles from the field, as well as hands on interaction using the department computer lab.

PSY435 Psychopharmacology (3 crs.)

Examines the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of psychoactive drugs. The mechanism of drug action, addiction, tolerance, and physical dependence for drugs of abuse and therapeutic drugs is studied. Prerequisites: PSY102 and PSY320 or permission of instructor.

PSY440 History and Systems of Psychology (3 crs.)

Explores the philosophical background, historical development, contemporary systems, and possible directions of psychology. Prerequisite: PSY101 or PSY102 or senior status or permission of instructor.

PSY445 Psychology of Thinking (3 crs.)

Deals with the higher mental processes including problem solving, judgment, decision-making, reasoning, language and intelligence. The aim is to inform the student of theories and research in these areas as well as to improve their thinking skills. Prerequisites: PSY101 or PSY102 and PSY325.

PSY447 Multicultural Health Psychology (3 crs.)

Investigates health and illness in traditionally under-represented groups. Psychological models of behavior and social interaction discussed to explain how health and illness impact different populations. Possible areas of coverage will be the role of health psychology in understanding epidemics world-wide. Other topics include the impact of ethnicity, gender and age on health in the United States and in a global context. Includes readings, opportunities to problem solve, and to apply knowledge gained in the course to real-world examples. Goal is to increase appreciation of a world-view of health. Prerequisites: At least junior standing and PSY420 or by permission of instructor.

PSY450 Crisis Intervention (3 crs.)

Conceptual and practical frameworks for providing crisis intervention presented. Topics include the theory and philosophy of crisis intervention, problem solving, service delivery, community relations, burnout prevention, and evaluation of intervention efforts. Applications discussed include working with groups, crime victims, suicidal individuals, and bereaved persons. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PSY465 Human Factors (3 crs.)

Focuses on the application of psychological principles of human behavior, perception, and cognition to real-world environments. Topics include improving workplace and transportation safety, improving human-computer interaction, and discussing general ways humans can work more easily and naturally with complex technologies in today's society. Prerequisite: PSY301 or PSY305.

PSY470 Legal Psychology (3 crs.)

Informs student about relationship between psychology and law by introducing contemporary psychological knowledge as it applies to the legal system. Topics include psychology of evidence, social psychology of the jury, the psychologist as an expert witness, psychology of jury selection, and research methods used by legal psychologists.

PSY475 Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3 crs.)

Surveys theoretical and empirical research relevant to the behaviors and experiences of individuals in relation to the human constructs called organizations and the economic activities called work.

PSY485 Tests and Measurements (3 crs.)

Focuses on the statistical and psychological theory of tests and measurements. Prerequisite: a recent undergraduate statistics course.

PSY490 Selected Topics in Psychology (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

PSY500 Advanced Research Design and Statistics (3 crs.)

Concerned with scientific method to the investigation of behavior. Research methods and experimental design and statistics are reviewed along with a survey of the more recent significant developments in the field of psychology. Use of computer statistical packages to analyze data is emphasized. Students demonstrate competency in descriptive statistics. Prerequisite: Students are required to take and pass a competency exam prior to entry into the course. Contact the professor or departmental secretary for test procedures.

PSY512 Theories of Learning (3 crs.)

Examines the explanations of human learning processes offered by various behavioral and cognitive theorists. Classical and contemporary theories and applications are presented dealing with topics such as conditioning, motivation, memory, and problem solving.

PSY515 Theories of Personality (3 crs.)

Explores theories, issues, and research in personality, and encourages the psychology graduate student to develop his or her own pragmatic orientation.

PSY516 Motivation (3 crs.)

Examines and compares different theories of motivation. Basic motives such as hunger, thirst, sex, and aggression in humans and animals examined. In addition, more complex motives discussed in light of decision theory.

PSY518 Principles of Cognition and Behavior Modification (3 crs.)

Study of applied techniques of modifying behavior and cognition. Includes stimulus control processes, reinforcement theory, modeling, extinction, desensitization, counter-conditioning, cognitive restructuring, stress inoculation training. Prerequisite: PSY500.

PSY519 Life Span Psychology (3 crs.)

Lifespan development provides information about developmental processes from conception through adulthood. Interaction of environmental and genetic factors stressed. Theoretical points of view are presented. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in child development and/or permission of the instructor.

PSY527 Studies in the Psychology of Adolescence (3 crs.)

Systematic study of physical, behavioral and psychological development of the individual from puberty to emerging adulthood.

PSY529 Psychology of Successful Aging (3 crs.)

Focuses on process of aging during later years of the life span. Developmental approach pro-vides basis for the systematic study of aging. The interaction of the physiological, psychological, emotional, intellectual, and social aspect of aging are emphasized. Prerequisite: PSY519.

PSY530 Studies in the Psychology of the Exceptional Child (3 crs.)

Concerned with findings of significant studies on the exceptional child. Emphasis given to the contributions of research dealing with characteristics of the exceptional child, identification, ways of meeting special needs and implications for child and those who work with the child.

PSY531 Advanced Cognitive Psychology (3 crs.)

In-depth analysis of new issues within the field of cognitive psychology is focus. Sample content includes models of memory, processes of cognition, implicit versus explicit memory, and problem solving.

PSY532 Advanced Physiological Psychology (3 crs.)

Gives student interested in brain-behavior relationships an introduction to experimental manipulations commonly used in the research area. Students do extensive reading within a selected area of research as preparation for a series of demonstrations using several invasive techniques routinely used in the field. Both neurophysiological and behavioral observations are made in order to test specific experimental hypotheses.

PSY533 Advanced Social Psychology (3 crs.)

Study of how people make sense of others and of themselves; how ordinary people think about people and how they think they think about people.

PSY534 Survey of Research in Abnormal Behavior (3 crs.)

Review research and theoretical contributions to the understanding of abnormal behavior, with primary emphasis on discussion of recent research findings regarding the etiology of various mental disorders.

PSY540 History of Psychology (3 crs.)

Reviews history of psychology from its roots in philosophy through its transformation into a science. Included is a critical examination of major issues, assumptions, and schools of thought.

PSY590 Introduction to Group Dynamics (3 crs.)

Examines the theory and experiences of group interaction. Observation and participation in face-to-face groups of varying structures and functions are provided. Theories of group development and observational systems and techniques applicable in educational, business, and institutional settings are examined. Selected topics include goal analysis, functional group structures, leadership influence, conforming norm pressures, deviant behaviors, and communication network patterns.

PSY594 Selected Topics (3 crs.)

Opportunity to study concepts and research in areas of psychology not covered by the regular course of study in a seminar setting. Areas covered are those in which instructors have special expertise and in which there is a special student request.

PSY598 Independent Study (3 crs.)

PSY612 Thesis I (3 crs.)

Designed to provide master's degree candidates with opportunity to conduct a major research project. A research proposal, literature review, and a pilot study required. First in a two-course sequence. Prerequisite: PSY500.

PSY613 Thesis II (3 crs.)

Second of a two-semester sequence of graduate courses designed to provide master's degree candidates an opportunity to conduct a major research project. Students implement the research proposal designed in Thesis I, collect data, complete a statistical analysis, write a research report, and make an oral presentation. Students experience the procedure and format of conducting a research project that might be prepared for publication in a psychological journal. Prerequisite: PSY612.

 

Reading (RDG)

RDG050 Developmental Reading and Study Skills (3 crs.)

Designed to aid in mastery of reading and study skills necessary for success in nearly all academic fields. Individual attention given to areas needing improvement in reading efficiency and flexibility, vocabulary, comprehension of specific types of content materials, outlining, test-taking, note-taking and allied activities. All work based on careful diagnosis of strengths and weakness.

RDG232 Reading in the Elementary School (3 crs.)

Emphasizes nature of the reading process, general principles of instruction and translating learning theory into sound classroom practice. Participation in an educational field experience required.

RDG329 Reading in the Content Areas (3 crs.)

Opportunity to view reading instruction as it applies to content areas. Specifically, course will deal with: vocabulary development, development of cognitive skills, application of the D.R.A./D.R.T.A., application of reading/study skills, test administration, interpretation and evaluation, application of research findings to reading methodology, readiness as applied to reading in the content areas.

RDG334 Classroom Based Literacy Assessment (3 crs.)

Explores concepts of assessment and evaluation in literacy development and their connection to instruction. Enhances awareness of current assessment strategies. Classroom experience with children required. Prerequisite: RDG232.

RDG340 Seminar in Literacy Tutoring (3 crs.)

Enables students to learn and practice effective teaching techniques for helping at-risk readers and writers. College students implement classroom practices in a tutoring situation with local K-8 students. Prerequisites: RDG232 and RDG334.

RDG413 Teaching Reading to English Language Learners (3 crs.)

Designed to address teaching reading and writing to the English language learner in a non-ESL classroom; address the concerns of teachers who encounter students in their classrooms who are learning English; explore theories about first-and second-language acquisition; introduce classroom best practices in literacy as they relate to learners of English; and support teachers in developing an understanding of the basic principles of teaching and assessing English language learners with practical suggestions for assisting students in learning to cope in their new culture. Course is reserved for reading minors and master's of reading students.

RDG422 Studies in Children's Literature (3 crs.)

Designed to incorporate children's literature as a method for examining the relationships between authors' writing processes, curriculum, and pedagogy in the elementary classroom. Emphasizes current literacy research related to writers' craft in order to demonstrate a wide range of purposes and styles of writing and how various genres can be used to develop literacy skills.

RDG431 Seminar on Selected Topics in Reading (3 crs.)

Focuses on a critical and in-depth analysis of topics in reading related to the following specific areas: the reading process and methodology; research findings; evaluation of materials and techniques; and practical application of theory and research to classroom procedures.

RDG490 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

 

RDG520 Tutoring Secondary Students (3 crs.)

Designed to give master's degree candidates experience working with upper-grade students who are having difficulty becoming effective readers and writers. Candidates in this course will tutor 3-5 freshman students once per week for the course duration. In addition, student's reading and writing abilities will be assessed at the beginning and end of the course.

RDG528 Foundations of Literacy Development (3 crs.)

Provides a comprehensive overview of factors related to literacy development and explores the implications of knowledge about the reading/writing process for effective instruction. Topics considered include such areas as: research knowledge about literacy processes, early literacy experiences, comprehension, vocabulary/concept development, word identification, literature for reading instruction, microcomputers and literacy, instructional materials, classroom organization for effective literacy instruction, and strategies for instruction/assessment in reading.

RDG529 Reading and Reasoning Beyond the Primary Grades (3 crs.)

Examines comprehensively all aspects of literacy instruction for older children and adults. Special attention given to topics having unique relevance to older readers such as: mastery of expository text structures, development of independence in monitoring and controlling one's own reading, building of vocabulary concepts, and development of positive attitudes toward print.

RDG532 Diagnosis and Assessment in Reading (3 crs.)

Explores varied means for obtaining information about children's abilities in using print as a basis for aiding further development. Critically examines the strengths and weaknesses of assorted reading/writing assessment strategies. Emphasis will be given to those strategies that are process-oriented and have the most direct application to instruction. Students will practice using informal observation techniques and varied measurement instruments as a basis for preparation of a clinical case report. Prerequisites: RDG528 and RDG529 or permission of instructor.

RDG533 Advanced Diagnosis and Assessment in Reading (3 crs.)

Further examines issues introduced in RDG532 with emphasis upon refining and expanding expertise in observation of literacy development. Preparation of a clinical case report required. Other topics investigated include: current issues in literacy assessment, new strategies for assessment, organizing classrooms for optimal diagnosis and instruction, recent literature by reading researchers with implications for assessment. Prerequisite: RDG532.

RDG534 Laboratory Practicum in Reading (3 crs.)

Provides experience in facilitating children's literacy development in a clinical setting with guidance and support from university faculty. Assessment/instructional strategies are practiced and discussed as a means of building insights about literacy processes and individual developmental needs. Prerequisite: RDG532.

RDG535 Seminar in Literacy, Language, and Reading (3 crs.)

Explores current understandings of literacy processes with opportunities for in-depth study of topics of special interest and relevance. A capstone course, students reflectively examine concepts introduced in earlier courses including possibilities and problems of their application in varied instructional settings. Practice in curriculum leadership roles such as writing for publication and planning/implementation of in-service sessions provided. Prerequisites: RDG532, RDG534, and two other graduate-level courses in reading.

RDG554 Practicum in Reading (3 crs.)

Addresses a series of practical issues Teacher Leaders face on a daily basis. Topics include teaching adults, how to work with administrators, parents, and trainers of teacher leaders in coming years. Field site visits are included. Prerequisite: Master's degree.

RDG555 Practicum in Assessment (3 crs.)

Prepares Reading Recovery teachers to learn to observe and record the reading and writing strengths of individual children. Field site visits are included. Prerequisite: master's degree.

RDG594 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

RDG599 Independent Study (3 crs.)

RDG601 Language Development Theory (3 crs.)

Focuses on theory and current research related to effective Reading Recovery instruction. Examines and applies theoretical principles of learning and literacy learning to their practice. Evaluates and relates theories of literacy learning, thinking, and teaching to the process of becoming literate.

RDG602 Reading Thoughts and Processes (3 crs.)

Reading Recovery is a system intervention that changes how educators think about learning and instruction. Teacher Leaders are key to creating systemic change. Examines recent developments and research regarding issues Teacher Leaders are most likely to face when implementing Reading Recovery Programs in their respective sites.

RDG605 Reading Recovery Teacher Training I (4 crs.)

Assists teachers in developing an understanding of the Reading Recovery procedures in order to select from these procedures to meet individual learning needs. Lesson analysis, specific strategies, and charting student progress are important components of course. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

RDG606 Reading Recovery Teacher Training II (3 crs.)

Refines and expands the Reading Recovery teacher's level of awareness and understanding of how to effectively implement the Reading Recovery Program. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

RDG609 Internship (3 crs.)

RDG612 Thesis I (3 crs.)

Students identify, explore, and synthesize current information regarding a topic of special significance in literacy education. Work guided by reading faculty and must be approved by faculty committee. All students expecting to undertake advanced graduate studies in reading are urged to elect the thesis option.

RDG613 Thesis II (3 crs.)

Continuation of RDG612.

Social Work (SWK)

SWK102 Social Work in Social Welfare (3 crs.)

Examines the social work profession within the social welfare system. Develops an understanding of contemporary social work practice by examining its history, knowledge base, values, skills, methods, and fields of practice. Introduces the generalist model for practice which serves as a base for subsequent social work courses. Provides initial understanding of the needs and issues of special populations in relation to social welfare policies and services and social work practice. Requires a volunteer experience with a social service agency. Provides introduction to the profession and serves as resource to make an informed decision about social work as a career.

SWK150 Human Relations Lab (3 crs.)

Develops effective generic interpersonal skills. Uses a laboratory design which has a variety of experiential and didactic experiences to understand components of effective interaction; develop self awareness about your own strengths and limitations; gain feedback about others' perception of you; establish personal goals for growth and development; and evaluate ongoing progress in communication competencies.

SWK250 Assessing Individuals in the Social Environment (3 crs.)

Focuses on assessment skills to understand human behavior of individuals in the social environment. Assessments based on biological, psychological, sociological and spiritual factors as well as life cycle or situational specifics that may influence behavior. Requires a volunteer experience in a social service agency of 10-15 hours.

SWK262 Introduction to Child Welfare Practice (3 crs.)

Provides knowledge and understanding of some of the primary problems in the field of child welfare. Improves students' ability to identify and assess various types of child maltreatment and neglect. Family relationships, social, cultural, legal, and other environmental influences are included in the assessment. Introduces the child welfare system and current best practices in child welfare treatment and intervention through interactive and experiential course work.

SWK265 Understanding Diversity for Social Work Practice (3 crs.)

Helps students develop tools for increased understanding of and sensitivity to human diversity and cultures different from their own. Students asked to identify areas where differing customs or values could have impact. Generalist approach to social work practice, which encompasses the ethnic sensitive model for intervention and management of human diversity issues. Includes work with, but is not limited to, populations of people who are oppressed due to racial, cultural, religion, gender or sexual identity or other minority status groups in society.

SWK270 Social Work Practice with Individuals (3 crs.)

Presents entry-level social work students with basic social work principles, values and generic skills needed for work with individuals utilizing a direct-service generalist approach to social work practice. Provides the foundation of evidence based practice skills deemed applicable to all practice contexts, i.e., individual, family, group organization and communities. Range of competencies and skills covered includes, but not limited to, the use of the ecological perspective, developing the social history, problem-solving/critical thinking, the four phases of the Interactional Approach to Helping Model and service planning. These skills are studied in the classroom and made operational via classroom and lab exercises, simulated experiences and external assignments. Professional Status necessary for higher-level social work courses. Policies and application procedures are described in the Social Work Handbook. Prerequisites: SWK102 and SWK250.

SWK275 Social Work Skills for Working with Groups (3 crs.)

Expands the assessment and intervention skills learned in SWK270 to working with groups. Students learn how group theories should inform their developing of group leadership skills. Emphasizes the planning, facilitating, and evaluating of groups often used in social work practice. Prerequisite: SWK270.

SWK327 Social Work Practice with Families (3 crs.)

Offers a skills foundation for generalist practice with families. As mediators with families, students learn intervention skills which enable development of family in environment processes for improving social functioning. Prerequisite: SWK270.

SWK340 Assessing Organizations and Communities in Society (3 crs.)

Examines human behavior concepts in organization and community systems. Builds upon the ecological/system's framework introduced in SWK250 to extend this approach to larger systems in the social environment context. Considers the implications of system resources and configuration for meeting human needs. The role and function of generalist social workers to understand and advocate for system development and change is emphasized. Prerequisites: SWK250 and SWK360.

SWK347-359 Special Fields of Social Work (3 crs.)

Extends and elaborates the generalist approach to social work practice to a specific field of practice. The special field is studied through the examination of curricular areas: human behavior, practice, policy and services, research and special populations. Special field courses include, but are not limited to: Behavioral Health (SWK347), Substance Abuse (SWK348), Aging (SWK351), Developmental Disabilities (SWK356), Health Care (SWK357), Schools (SWK358), and Violence in Interpersonal Relationships (SWK359). Prerequisite: SWK270.

SWK360 Research Techniques for Social Workers (3 crs.)

Introduces basic research concepts, procedures for conducting research, and their application to social work practice. Basic knowledge of scientific inquiry, the ethics that guide research, and the roles of social workers as researchers is also covered. Both qualitative and quantitative methods of collecting and analyzing data are given major attention. Students learn the procedure for developing a research proposal. Prerequisites: SWK250 and MAT117.

SWK370 Social Work Practice with Organizations and Communities (3 crs.)

Content is an essential, integral part of the generalist approach to social work practice. Extends the generic and direct service generalist frameworks learned in SWK270 and the assessment knowledge learned in SWK340 to practice interventions with organizations and communities. Considers the prevailing social work approaches for organization and community development and changes. The theory and skills of these approaches are studied in the classroom and made operational in simulated and field experiences. Prerequisites: SWK270 and SWK340.

SWK383 Selected Topics in Social Welfare (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

SWK388 Preparation for Practicum (1 cr.)

Explores some professional aspects of social work. Combines new and practical information to help bridge the gap between the classroom and the field practicum experience. Offers seminars and individual consultation about the field practicum process. Includes topics about field work objectives, procedures, and roles and responsibilities of all parties involved. Addresses a wide range of practice issues e.g., ethical and legal issues, clinical record keeping, professional standards for behavior, stress management and use of supervision. All preliminary procedures for establishment of a field practicum will be met through this course. This course required of all social work majors in the semester prior to registering for field practicum. Prerequisite: SWK270.

SWK389 Field Work in Social Work I (6 crs.)

Majors in social work must take all of these, (SWK389, SWK390, SWK391) concurrently for a total of 15 credit hours. Provides experience in social work practice in a community-based agency under supervision and instruction from agency staff. Involves providing agency services while further developing and enhancing social work practice skills by supplementing and reinforcing classroom learning. Practicum includes a minimum of 450 clock hours in placement. The program educational objectives are the evaluation criteria for successful completion of the field work. Prerequisites: Social work major and successful completion of all courses in the major. Note: Students must have earned a C or better in all required social work courses before enrolling.

SWK390 Field Work in Social Work II (6 crs.)

See SWK389 for the course description.

SWK391 Seminar in Social Work Methods (3 crs.)

Builds on the field work experience and must be taken concurrently with Field I-II to integrate the concepts and skills of the program for entry-level social work practice. Emphasis on the generalist approach covering the basic elements of assessment and intervention as applied to field learning. In conjunction with the field experience, integrates theory with practice across systems (i.e., individual, family, group organizations and community processes). Major research project required. Prerequisites: Social work major. Successful completion of all courses in the major with a C or better.

SWK420 Gender Issues for Helping Professionals (3 crs.)

Examines institutionalized gender socialization, current gender issues and controversies, feminist theory for understanding behavior, and guiding principles and practices for helping professionals. Students encouraged to develop heightened self-awareness about their gender-related attitudes and values for functioning as a helping professional. May be taken for under-graduate or graduate credit. Prerequisites: SWK 270 or junior status.

SWK450 Social Welfare Policies and Services (3 crs.)

Presents framework for developing and analyzing contemporary social policies and programs. Focuses on current issues and social problems by examining policy and service implications with an emphasis on realist development and change strategies.

SWK490 Selected Topics in Social Welfare (1-3 crs.)

Provides the opportunity for a range of topics to explore issues and concerns for the helping professions. Designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students.

SWK501 Principles and Philosophies of Social Work (3 crs.)

Introduces the generalist model for practice, which serves as a base for subsequent social work courses and provides initial understanding of the needs and issues of special populations in relation to social welfare policies and services as well as social work practice. The course provides an introduction to the profession and the M.S.W. program while helping to prepare students for their subsequent field placements. Fifteen volunteer hours are required. Approximately one-third of this class will include online content, one-third will be in person with the instructor, and one-third will be via video conferencing. Prerequisite: None.

SWK505 Understanding Social Work Practice with Diverse Populations (3 crs.)

Focuses on issues of understanding human diversity, risk, societal power and privilege, including issues related to sexism, heterosexism, classism, ageism, religion and spirituality, cultural identity development oppression, risk, resilience, and empowerment. Approximately one-third of this class will include online content, one-third will be in person with the instructor, and one-third will be via video conferencing. Prerequisite: None.

SWK510 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I (3 crs.)

Examines the life span approach to human development with a focus on the interaction between the individual's bio-psycho-social functioning and the social environment. It considers the impact of micro and mezzo (i.e. families and small groups) systems on behavior with particular emphasis given to populations considered to be at risk. Approximately one-third of this class will include online content, one-third will be in person with the instructor, and one-third will be via video conferencing. Prerequisite: SWK 501 Principles and Philosophies of Social Work.

SWK511 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II (3 crs.)

Emphasizes 1) the interaction of social and economic forces with young, middle-aged, and older adults and social systems; 2) traditional and alternative theories about systems as they interact with people, promoting and impeding health, welfare, and well-being, in context of human culture and diversity; and 3) knowledge about opportunity structures and how they promote and deter human development and need-meeting. Students evaluate theory and apply it to practice situations. Approximately one-third of this class will include online content, one-third will be in person with the instructor, and one-third will be via video conferencing. Prerequisite: SWK 510 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I.

SWK515 Social Welfare Policy (3 crs.)

Furnishes students with the orienting knowledge and skills needed to examine social welfare policies and to understand their relevance to social service delivery and social work practice. Approximately one-third of this class will include online content, one-third will be in person with the instructor, and one-third will be via video conferencing. Prerequisite: SWK 501 Principles and Philosophies of Social Work.

SWK520 Micro/Mezzo Social Work Practice (3 crs.)

Offers opportunities for applying and studying advanced generalist practice with individuals, families and groups. Course content is presented in a face-to-face format with web-based supplements. Students will learn and apply intervention skills to their specific area of interest, which enable development of individuals, families, and groups in environment processes for improving social functioning. Prerequisite: SWK 501 Principles and Philosophies of Social Work; co-requisite: SWK 530 Field Practicum I.

SWK521 Macro Social Work Practice (3 crs.)

Course conceptualizes macro social work as the profession that brings about social change. The course extends from understanding theories about communities and organizations to assessment and practice. Students will focus on analysis of the community as a social system, common strategies for producing change in community work, and the nature of formal organizations as environments through which social services are provided in the community, and the knowledge and skills necessary to affect change within organizations. Students will examine the role of a macro social worker as program developer, program administrator and organization developer. This course will meet 2/3 in the classroom with 1/3 of the schedule involving on-line work. Prerequisite: SWK 520 Micro/Mezzo Social Work Practice; co-requisite: SWK 531 Practicum.

SWK525 Research Methods (3 crs.)

Introduces research concepts, procedures for conducting research and their application to social work practice. Advanced knowledge of scientific inquiry, the ethics that guide research, and the roles of social workers as researchers are also covered. Both qualitative and quantitative methods of collecting and analyzing data are given major attention. Students learn the procedure for developing a research proposal. Approximately one-third of this class will include online content, one-third will be in person with the instructor, and one-third will be via video conferencing. Prerequisite: None.

SWK530, 531 Field Practicum I/II (3 crs./3 crs.)

Provides students with practical experience (200 hours each) in supervised direct service activities across all client systems from the individuals level to that of the community. This initial field experience allows the student to apply theory and skills acquired in the generalist foundation areas while simultaneously fostering the development of a professionally reflective, ethical, knowledgeable, and self-evaluating social worker. Prerequisite: None; co-requisites: SWK 520 Micro/Mezzo Social Work Practice/SWK 521 Macro Social Work Practice.

SWK601 Integrative Seminar (3 crs.)

Course builds upon the foundation content from students' B.S.W. programs. It serves as a "bridge" course to integrate B.S.W. learning in preparation for M.S.W. courses. A major focus in the course is an in-depth look at the history of social welfare services and the relationship to current social work knowledge, skills, and values. A volunteer experience is required that serves as the basis for the course project. The course will be primarily taught via distance learning with some meetings with the instructor. Offered in Summer. Prerequisite: Advanced standing admission status.

SWK602 Behavioral Health Care Settings (3 crs.)

Extends and elaborates the advanced generalist approach to social work practice to a special field of practice. Introduces the social worker's role in behavioral health care and the policy issues that impact on practice. Focuses on four content areas: 1) what the social worker's role is in adult and child behavioral health care settings; 2) historic and current policy that affect behavioral health care services; 3) current research in behavioral health care related issues and 4) international models of care. The special field is studied through the examination of curricular areas: human behavior, practice, policy, and services, research and special populations. Designed to help prepare students for advanced generalist social work practice with client systems and social resource systems relating to mental or behavioral health. Social workers are frequently involved in the delivery of services to people and families troubled by mental disorder in settings designed to deal specifically with those problems, as well as in other practice areas such as corrections, schools, child welfare, and gerontology. Prerequisite: SWK601 Integrative Seminar or completion of Foundation year.

SWK603 Gender Issues (3 crs.)

In-depth study of the concepts, policies, practices, and research in the field of gender studies. Examines institutionalized gender socialization, current gender issues and controversies, feminist theory for understanding behavior, and guiding principles and practices for helping professionals. Students are encouraged to develop heightened self-awareness about their gender related attitudes and values for functioning as a helping professional. Prerequisite: SWK601 Integrative Seminar or completion of Foundation year.

SWK604 Health Care Settings (3 crs.)

Extends and elaborates the advanced generalist approach to social work practice to a special field of practice. Introduces the social worker's role in health care and the policy issues that impact on practice. Focuses on four content areas: 1) what the social worker's role is in various health care settings; 2) historic and current policy that affect health care services; 3) current research in various health care related issues, e.g. living wills and AIDS and 4) international models of care. The special field is studies through the examination of curricular areas: human behavior, practice, policy, and services, research and special populations. Prerequisite: SWK601 Integrative Seminar or completion of Foundation year.

SWK605 Child Welfare Settings (3 crs.)

In-depth study of the concepts, policies, practices, and research in the field of child welfare and family and children services. Provides an introduction to the child welfare field, an overview of the development of services for children, a detailed examination of the provision of services; and an exploration of the ethical implications of child welfare practice. Focuses on the spectrum of services designed to support, supplement, or substitute for the care traditionally given by biological parents, and explores the major issues confronting the practitioner today with implications for the future. Views family events within their ecological context and strives to create sensitivity to various family forms and orientations. In concert with the generalist perspective and program goals and objectives, students will have learning experiences designed to develop and integrate their knowledge, values, and skills essential for the attainment of advanced level competency in child welfare and family and children service. Prerequisite: SWK601 Integrative Seminar or completion of Foundation year.

SWK 606 School Settings (3 crs.)

Designed to provide graduate students with an in-depth understanding of the field of social work practice within schools settings. Covers policy, research, practice, and human behavior content within the field of schools through the exploration of broad content and the use of a variety of educational approaches. Examines the roles and functions of social workers within educational institutions, and provides students with opportunities for exploration of the application of social work values and ethics within a host setting. Issues of economic and social justice as well as diversity are also examined in the content of the educational systems of the United States. Prerequisite: SWK601 Integrative Seminar or completion of Foundation year.

SWK607 Emergency Mental Health and Trauma (3 crs.)

In-depth study of the concepts, policies, practices, and research in crisis intervention during disasters. Provides introduction to the disaster field, a detailed examination of the human service delivery systems; and guidelines for attending to the emotional and mental health needs of both disaster survivors and responders, using the Critical Incident Stress Management model. Prerequisite: SWK601 Integrative Seminar or completion of Foundation year.

SWK608 Program Management (3 crs.)

Designed to expand students' knowledge of and skills in effective program management of human services organizations and to provide approaches for managing service program effectively. Organizational and management theories and principles are applied to a range of human services. Prerequisites: Co or Prerequisites: SWK601 Integrative Seminar or completion of Foundation year (500 level required courses).

SWK609 Introduction to Art Therapy (3 crs.)

Advanced elective course explores the principles and the techniques of art therapy and considers the usefulness of art therapy in providing alternatives and supplements to the customary verbal methods of intervention. Ways of working with clients at various stages of the life cycle, childhood through old age, and with clients who are on different levels of psychosocial functioning are examined. Issues in art therapy are explored both cognitively and experientially. Previous training in the visual arts and artistic ability are not required. Prerequisite: SWK601 Integrative Seminar or completion of Foundation year.

SWK 610 Advanced Human Behavior in the Social Environment (3 crs.)

The required HBSE course during the advanced year for all students will put emphasis on the application of material in the student's area of interest. Students will be encouraged to help develop their knowledge through a variety of reading, activities and lecture. Additional material will focus on diversity and populations at risk, and social and economic justice. Approximately one-third of this class will include online content, one-third will be in person with the instructor, and one-third will be via video conferencing. Prerequisite: SWK 511 Human Behavior in the Social Environment.

SWK 612 Social Work and the Law (3 crs.)

Social workers understand that virtually everything they do professionally in the 21st century has to include evaluations of risk, legality, funding and unintended consequences. Malpractice appropriately receives much attention in this regard but legislative and regulatory requirements regarding funding, grants and contracts, definitions of disabilities, responsibilities of different levels of government and many other legal aspects of the profession must also be considered. Law, for most people, is a foreign language and social workers need to be somewhat fluent in this language so they can deal with the convergence of law and social work, social services and social policy. Approximately one-third of this class will include online content, one-third will be in person with the instructor, and one-third will be via video conferencing. Prerequisite or co-requisite: SWK 601 Integrative Seminar.

SWK 615 Advanced Social Welfare Policy (3 crs.)

Course introduces conceptual approaches to policy analysis and assesses selected social policies, programs and services in the areas of income maintenance, health care and personal social services in accordance with these approaches and with specific reference to their impact on special populations. Approximately one-third of this class will include online content, one-third will be in person with the instructor, and one-third will be via video conferencing. Prerequisite: SWK 515 Social Welfare Policy.

SWK 620 Advanced Micro/Mezzo Social Work Practice (3 crs.)

Provides advanced knowledge, practice experience and consultation in both a classroom setting and in collaboration with practice in the student's field placement, which focuses on individuals, families, and/or groups. The use of the supervisory model in agencies will be explored in depth. Prerequisite: SWK 520 Micro/Mezzo Social Work Practice; co-requisite: SWK 630 Field Practicum I.

SWK 621 Advanced Macro Social Work Practice (3 crs.)

Assists the student in developing knowledge of administration supervision, grant writing, fundraising, and budgeting. The macro social work practice course will provide models for developing programs that promote social and economic justice for the underserved, the poor, and the oppressed populations. This course will meet 2/3 in the classroom and 1/3 on-line. Prerequisite: SWK 521 Macro Social Work Practice; co-requisite: SWK 630 Advanced Field Practicum I.

SWK 625 Advanced Research Methods (3 crs.)

Focuses on social work practice research paradigms, models, and methods. Particular attention is given to the conduct of evaluation and assessments projects. Students will conduct independent evaluative research within their field placement settings. This course also give the student a more in depth exploration of gender and ethnic minority research issues and computer-assisted, descriptive and exploratory data analysis. Approximately one-third of this class will include online content, one-third will be in person with the instructor, and one-third will be via video conferencing. Prerequisite: SWK 525 Research Methods.

SWK 630,631 Advanced Field Practicum I/II (3 crs. SWK 630, 3 crs. SWK 631)

Students complete 250 hours of supervised agency/organization practice experience during the first semester of the second year. Students will be in the field three days per week. The same course requirements and hourly expectation will be in place for Advance Field Practicum II in the second semester of the second year. Prerequisite: SWK 530/531 Field Practicum I/II or Advanced Standing Status; co-requisite: SWK 620 Advanced Micro/Mezzo Social Work Practice or SWK 621 Advanced Macro Social Work Practice.

SWK 632 Capstone Seminar (3 crs.)

Capstone Seminar, taken concurrently with SWK 631: Field Instruction IV provides a bridge between the graduate student role and functioning as an advanced practitioner. The Capstone Seminar examines issues and concerns facing social workers in advanced professional practice, and integrates and synthesizes knowledge, value and skill components with field experiences through focused case studies. Prerequisites: SWK 620 Advanced Micro/Mezzo Social Work Practice or SWK 621 Advanced Macro Social Work Practice; co-requisite: SWK 631 Advanced Field Practicum II.

SWK640 Selected Topics (3 crs.)

Provides the opportunity for a range of topics to explore issues and concerns for the social work profession. Designed for advanced graduate students. Prerequisite: SWK601 Integrative Seminar or completion of Foundation year (500 level required courses).

Sociology (SOC)

SOC101 Introduction to Sociology: Society and Diversity (3 crs.)

Reviews basic sociological concepts, theories and research methods. Shows relationship to other social sciences and provides an overview of specific content areas in sociology with a focus on structural and cultural influences on behavior. Defines diversity discusses its functional and dysfunctional consequences, and analyzes its relationship to social structure and culture.

SOC220 Social Stratification (3 crs.)

Examines the attributes by which individuals are hierarchically ranked (stratified) in society, the extent to which these rankings inhibit or promote opportunity for success in life, and the degree to which movement between these social strata is possible. Emphasis on using current empirical data to describe and explain the role of gender, race, and class in the stratification of American society. Basis and extent of stratification in other developed and less-developed countries also explored. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC241 Contemporary Social Problems (3 crs.)

Explores the structural roots of major social problems from a sociological perspective. Examples of problems addressed include racism, sexism, poverty, crime, and threats to the environment.

SOC243 Minority Groups (3 crs.)

Defines the concept of minority. Looks at the impact of prejudice and discrimination. Reviews some of the major minority groups in the United States and provides some cross-cultural comparisons. Major problems and possible solutions discussed. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC244 Criminology (3 crs.)

Explores the evolution of criminological theory as a story of ideas rooted in and subject to both history and biography. Special attention is placed on the explanatory powers of structure versus agency. Process of criminalization and the prison industry are also addressed. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC245 Juvenile Delinquency (3 crs.)

Explores the history of delinquent behavior among juveniles through a socio-historical and structural perspective. The social context within which juveniles behave and society's response to this behavior—particularly the implementation and evolution of the juvenile justice system—is critically analyzed. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC248 Sociology of Religion (3 crs.)

Examines the structure and functions of religious organizations and phenomena with an emphasis on comparing the varieties of religious expression in the United States. Also studies the role of religion in global change and what the future of religion will be. Models for understanding the development of personal faiths examined. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC257 Sociological Patterns of Courtship and Marriage (3 crs.)

Provides a systematic and analytical approach to the study of social relations in the area of mate choice, marriage and its alternatives. Considers development of gender roles, marital behavior in a changing society, social and interpersonal factors in mate selection, engagement, social factors in marital success, fertility control, marriage and parenthood, divorce, remarriage, and the role of marriage counseling.

SOC258 Women's Roles and Status (3 crs.)

Explores the position of women in American society, with emphasis on the social, cultural, economic, and political forces contributing to women's contemporary roles, statuses, and self images. Stress is on the socialization process, role conflicts, and images of women current in the larger society. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC275 Sociology of Sport and Leisure (3 crs.)

Examines the development of sport and leisure and how they reflect social life. Emphasis on socialization and social differentiation in sport and leisure. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC320 Sociology of the Body (3 crs.)

Explores our cultural understandings, ideals, and practices regarding the body throughout time, especially in the United States. Emphasizes how and why we construct particular bodies and bodily practices as favorable or unfavorable and how societies treat and engage with the body, particularly as related to gender, disability, race, and sexuality. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC331 Internship I (3 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

SOC332 Internship II (3 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

SOC335 Internship III (6 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

SOC344 Sociology of Death (3 crs.)

Studies sociological aspects of death and dying primarily in industrial societies, although some cross-cultural analysis will be presented. Emphasis on death as a societal and institutional phenomena; the ability/inability of certain societal institutions (medicine, family, religion) to adjust or adapt to death of a member will be critically evaluated. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC345 Deviance and Social Control (3 crs.)

Explores classical and contemporary theoretical and empirical works explaining the concept of deviance, deviant behavior and social stigma. Social construction of deviance and the evolution and management of deviant identities emphasized. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC346 Urban Sociology (3 crs.)

Analysis of the process of urbanization with major emphasis upon contemporary urban society. Approach centered around urbanism as a way of life, with emphasis on people and their actions and relationships. Course also concerned with social ecology, the dynamic system of spatial patterns and relationships that make up the structure of city growth. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC351 Race Relations (3 crs.)

Studies sociological principles underlying race relations with emphasis on black-white relations in the United States. Concepts of race and patterns of interaction between racially and culturally diverse groups also highlighted. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC354 Social Movements and Social Change (3 crs.)

Studies the nature of collective action and protest as catalysts for social change. Explores causes, tactics and achievements of specific social movements. Class will complete an active learning project on mobilizing for social change. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC359 Selected Topics in Sociology (3 crs.)

In-depth examination of selected theoretical and research topics in sociology, with the study subject announced in advance of scheduling. Primarily for advanced students. Prerequisite: SOC101. Specific course prerequisites may be set by the instructor.

SOC363 Population Problems (3 crs.)

Introduces basic demographic methods and theories to study the social causes and consequences of population size, composition, and distribution. Special attention given to impact of population change on resources, the environment, public policy, and personal lifestyles now and in the future. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC365 Elites in Society (3 crs.)

Concerned with how social, economic, and political elites acquire, exercise and maintain power in American society. Emphasis on the composition, cohesion, organization and homogeneity of elites. Class, education, lifestyle, political activity, and deviance of elites explored. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC369 Medical Sociology (3 crs.)

Addresses the contributions and relationships of sociology to medical and health care. Examines such topics as: social factors involved in illness, social epidemiology, social behavior of patients and health professionals, the social organization of health care, and social policy and health care. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC370 Sociology of the Arts (3 crs.)

Focuses on elite and popular culture through an examination of the structure, personnel, and patronage of the visual and performing arts. Explores linkages with other social institutions such as the economic and political order. Original student research will examine a selected area in depth. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC371 Social Dynamics of Aging (3 crs.)

Oriented to those periods or stages of life generally designated as middle-age or elderly. Examines the dynamics of social organization and aging social groups and possible effects on social interaction and social behavior. Various topics may be considered such as socialization, self concept and life changes, attitude development and changes, social role development and changes, reference group behavior and collective behavior. Additionally, will examine a few issues in depth, regarding aging and some or all of the concepts mentioned above. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC375 Sociology of Mass Communications (3 crs.)

Surveys the social role and influences of mass media in the United States. Using critical frameworks for media analysis, attention is given to the consumer's relationship to mass media and its role in preserving the status quo. Students will demonstrate media literacy in a final project. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC385 Introduction to Social Research (3 crs.)

Deals with philosophy and methods of science as they apply to sociology. Primary emphasis is on data analysis using computer technology. Students will construct composite measures, manage data, and test hypotheses. Prerequisites: SOC101 and MAT117. Course restricted to sociology majors and minors. Other students admitted by permission of the instructor.

SOC386 Data Collection and Analysis (3 crs.)

Provides extensive computer analysis skills and questionnaire design experience expected of sociologists. Design of questionnaires, sampling techniques and ethical concerns are covered as well as computer-based techniques for data entry, data management, and statistical analysis. Prerequisite: SOC385.

SOC391 Violence: A Sociological Perspective (3 crs.)

Explores social violence in communities from a socio-historical, social psychological, and structural perspective. Particular attention is given to understanding the impact violence has on individual lives.

SOC410 Family and Society (3 crs.)

Focuses on the family as a social institution, a social process, and as an interacting system. Includes emphasis on historical development and interrelationship between the family and society. Major theoretical perspectives are applied to the study of the family. Cross cultural and utopian (U.S.) family movements included. Prerequisite: SOC101 or SOC257.

SOC415 Senior Seminar (3 crs.)

Capstone course required for sociology majors in their senior year. Students will review basic sociological concepts, explore career options, study current primary research, read and discuss works of contemporary social theory, and apply a sociological perspective in a final paper. Evaluation includes a concepts examination, several group projects, an oral report, a written career plan, and a final comprehensive essay. Prerequisite: SOC101 and senior status.

SOC425 Sociology of Law (3 crs.)

Introduction to study of sociology of law and sociology in law. Primarily looks at legal systems of the United States, primary actors in those legal systems, social/cultural contests in which laws exist and are created, and how laws both reflect and affect social structure. Not designed to be a law course in the law school sense. Examines and applies sociological theories, concepts, and research to a particular arena of the social structure — laws and legal systems. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC435 Gender and Leadership (3 crs.)

Examines the interrelationship of gender and the broader social structure as we come to understand leadership in a variety of settings. Focuses on the larger realm of women and men working, together or otherwise, in leader-follower situations. Examines some of the critical theory on gender and leadership and students will apply the lessons learned to practical examples. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC450 Classical Social Theory (3 crs.)

Provides a critical and comparative study of the development of sociology, giving historical backgrounds and presenting recent theories of society. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC452 Contemporary Social Theory (3 crs.)

Focuses on 20th-century American sociologists and their contributions to the discipline. Idiosyncratic, biographical considerations and a broader "schools of theory" perspective will be utilized. Significant theoretical issues relevant to contemporary sociology also reviewed. Prerequisite: SOC450.

SOC490 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

SOC530 Sociology of Higher Education (3 crs.)

Examines the different social structures, organizations, and communities that make up higher education in the U.S. today. Emphasis is placed upon the history and recent development of higher education models. We will examine how the bureaucratic and institutional structures handle many of the issues, including the role of the "liberal arts," governance, distance education, the financing of higher education, the emergent emphasis on professional/vocational programs, institutional and systemic inequalities, growth of higher education administrative staffs, increasing role of for-profit institutions, the marketing of higher education, and the various "crises" identified by commentators and critics.

SOC550 Leadership Theory and Practice (3 crs.)

Overview of theories of leadership historical and contemporary. Emphasis will be on application of theories in pragmatic situations to promote system goals. Understanding of variations in effective leadership models across diverse cultures and subcultures is discussed.

SOC560 Leadership, Change, and Innovation (3 crs.)

Analysis of leaders as agents of social change. Leadership characteristics and strategies that have changed the world will be identified through a diverse set of case studies.

SOC570 Applied Organizational and Leadership Analysis (3 crs.)

Part of capstone experience that will prepare students to conduct an organizational and leadership analysis during their concurrent internship experience. Students will develop a design for their analysis, present and discuss their designs with other students, meet during their internship to discuss their progress, and present their conclusions.

SOC591 Selected Topics (3 crs.)

Provides the opportunity to offer courses in areas of interest to the Organizational Development and Leadership Program not covered by the department's regular graduate courses.

SOC609 Sociology Graduate Internship (3 crs.)

Designed to give graduate students relevant leadership experience in the concentration area. All ODL internships are to be approved by the director of the program in semester prior to the start of the internship. Students would ideally register for SOC609 and SOC570 concurrently.

 

 

Spanish (SPN)

SPN101 Beginning Spanish I (3 crs.)

Designed for students who have never studied the language before. Both textbook and authentic materials used to enable students to express themselves on personalized topics.

SPN102 Beginning Spanish II (3 crs.)

Continuation of SPN101. Both textbook and authentic materials used to enable students to express themselves on a variety of topics concerning self, family and friends. Prerequisite: SPN101 or placement.

SPN103 Intermediate Spanish (3 crs.)

Continuation of SPN102. Both textbook and authentic materials used to enable students to express themselves on a variety of topics concerning self, family, friends, and their communities. Reading, writing, listening, and speaking combined to explore the history, geography, music, arts, and film of Hispanic society. Prerequisite: SPN102 or placement.

SPN150 Spanish Civilization and Culture (3 crs.)

Study of the historical, social. and artistic factors that have contributed to the creation of the civilization and culture of Spain. Emphasis also given to the Hispanic civilization and culture of the Americas.

SPN202 Intermediate Conversation (3 crs.)

Training in speaking everyday Spanish by means of daily prepared speeches, free discussion, and real language practice including listening to authentic recorded Spanish conversations. Practice in pronunciation and intonation patterns provided. Prerequisite: SPN103 or department placement.

SPN204 Ideas and Cultures from the Spanish-Speaking World (3 crs.)

Introduction to Spanish and Latin American cultural studies. Introduces the richness and diversity of the Hispanic cultures from their inception to the present. A wide selection of themes reveal the political, social, and artistic components that contributed to the unique cultural development of the Hispanic countries. Prerequisite: SPN103 or department placement.

SPN260 Introduction to Literary Studies (3 crs.)

Introduces and develops the knowledge of different literary movements and genres (drama, fiction, poetry) within Hispanic literature. Such components as plot, structure, and style of narrative will be analyzed and evaluated and written assignments will focus on the recognition of these components. Prerequisite: SPN202, SPN204 or permission of instructor.

SPN302 Advanced Spanish Conversation (3 crs.)

Offers additional practice in conversational Spanish with an emphasis on the more abstract cultural conflicts and the like. Recommended for juniors and seniors who have completed the majority of their Spanish courses. Prerequisite: SPN202, SPN204 or permission of instructor.

SPN309 Spanish Phonetics (3 crs.)

Presents practical study of Spanish sounds, aimed to instill proper speech habits. Individual remedial drill on accent, intonation, and stress are conducted along with readings in recent studies of Spanish phonology. Prerequisite: SPN202, SPN204 or permission of instructor.

SPN312 Spanish Grammar (3 crs.)

Designed to present a thorough and systematic survey of Spanish grammar to students who have completed the intermediate level of training. Prerequisite: SPN202, SPN204 or permission of instructor.

SPN313 Advanced Composition and Stylistics (3 crs.)

Designed to refine and perfect the use of the Spanish language through analytical study of stylistics and syntax and through extensive practice and application of these principles in writing. Prerequisite: SPN202, SPN204 or permission of instructor.

SPN330 Spanish for the Professions (3 crs.)

Emphasizes communication skills in the daily world of business health professions, social work, and law enforcement. May include a study of the economic and business systems in the Hispanic world and extensive practice in using forms and expressions frequently used in correspondence of above mentioned professions. Content may be adapted to students' needs. Prerequisite: SPN202, SPN204 or permission of instructor.

SPN360 Masterpieces of Spanish Literature (3 crs.)

Designed to pursue selective readings of Spanish literature in all genres from the medieval period to the present day. Students will engage in critical discussions of the textual examples in efforts to trace the evolution of particular literary themes and styles in their cultural context. Prerequisite: SPN202, SPN204, SPN260 or permission of instructor.

SPN361 Masterpieces of Spanish-American Literature (3 crs.)

Designed to pursue selective readings of Spanish-American literature from the pre-colonial period to present. Students will engage in critical discussions of the textual examples in efforts to trace the evolution of particular literary themes and styles in their cultural context. Prerequisite: SPN202, SPN204, SPN260 or permission of instructor.

SPN385 Aspectos De La Civilización Hispana (3 crs.)

Seeks to enhance an understanding of and an appreciation for the many cultures that comprise the Spanish-speaking world. Focuses on important historical, political, social, and artistic events and figures that made significant contributions. Prerequisite: SPN202, SPN204 or permission of instructor.

SPN388 Spanish Internship I (3 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

SPN389 Spanish Internship II (3 crs.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

SPN400 Seminar: Advanced Studies in Spanish Language and Literature (3 crs.)

Detailed examination of specific aspects of Spanish literature, authors, genres, literary and philosophic schools, and linguistic problems such as translation and dialects. Seminar may be taken more than once provided a specific topic is not repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SPN410 Internship for Students of Spanish (1 cr.)

Contact the department for further information on internships.

SPN420 Theory and Practice of Translation (3 crs.)

Introduces various types and tools of translation and provides extensive practice in translating technical, commercial, diplomatic, and literary materials. In addition to practice in written translation of Spanish to English, other elements of the translation field such as interpretation, adaptation, and subtitling discussed.

SPN490 Selected Topics (3 crs.)

Supply Chain Management (SCM)

SCM200 Statistical Applications in Business (3 crs.)

Topical coverage includes estimation of parameters and test of hypotheses for a variety of populations based on large and small sample sizes. May include coverage of analysis of frequencies, analysis of variance, quality control, linear regression. Taught in a spreadsheet environment and emphasis placed on critical thinking and business reasoning skills. Students typically carry out projects and submit results in the form of written and oral reports. Prerequisites: MAT140 and MIS142.

SCM215 Information Process in Commerce (3 crs.)

Includes a description of core business processes and the information in the business environment. Studies the rationale, methods, and procedures commonly employed in re-engineering business processes in the business world. Re-engineering is often demanded whenever a new ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) system is contemplated or implemented.

SCM315 Strategic Procurement (3 crs.)

Designed to provide an understanding of strategic procurement issues in today's business environment. Students will learn a variety of procurement strategies, processes, and tools. Utilizes case studies to understand better both the academic and practical aspects of procurement issues.

SCM330 Supply Chain and Operations Management (3 crs.)

Applies knowledge the students obtain in lower division course work to managing the operations of a firm as they apply to manufacturing a product or providing a service. Deals with issues such as managing, forecasting, planning, and designing manufacturing or service facilities. In addition, strategies for their efficient operations such as production and inventory control as well as quality management are also covered. Also deals with supply chain management issues such as globalization, relationships between partners, strategies for efficient operation, and organization and management of partners. Prerequisite: SCM 200 .

SCM 355 Managing Quality and Continuous Improvement (3 crs.)

Covers the basic concepts of managing quality in either a manufacturing or a service environment. The role of quality to enhance productivity and maintain a competitive position is the central focus. Principles and methodology needed to design systems that assure quality from both customer and manufacturer perspectives discussed. Managerial and technical skills and tools provide a comprehensive approach to the implementation and maintenance of quality systems. Principles of continuous improvement and their impact on quality management explored.

SCM370 Integrated Supply Chain Systems (3 crs.)

Covers concepts in designing, planning, and operating a supply chain. Considers the role e-business plays and how role varies based on product and industry characteristics. Also discusses how firms can integrate e-business when formulating strategy and designing their supply chains to improve supply chain performance. Prerequisite: SCM330.

SCM380 Data Mining for Supply Chain Management (3 crs.)

Emphasizes the process of discovering hidden patterns and relationships in large amounts of data. Topical coverage includes techniques such as data visualization, decision tree, forecasting, neural network, and Kohonen network. Covers a wide range of applications in the areas of supply chain such as fraud detection, tracking vendor performance, examining distribution network efficiency, and forecasting demands in goods. Prerequisite: SCM200.

SCM390 Strategic Warehouse Management (3 crs.)

Addresses warehouse operations, warehouse management systems, material handling systems, and the warehouse work force. Warehousing minimizes the effects of supply chain inefficiencies and allows product accumulation, consolidation, and customization. Students learn a variety of principles and systems inherent in world-class warehousing. Uses individual and group projects to teach the principles of warehousing.

SCM393 Selected Topics in Supply Chain Management (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

SCM481 Decision Models for Supply Chain Management (3 crs.)

Introduces a variety of models to aid decision making in supply chain management focusing on the integration of business processes from end user through original suppliers. Additional issues covered are concerned with the value added by the supply chain to customers from products, services, and information. Emphasis on applying tools and skills in the areas of spreadsheets, database languages, and statistics to gain insights into the integrated nature of the supply chain. Analysis will focus on optimization, risk analysis, decision analysis, forecasting, resource allocation, new product introduction and production, and inventory planning and control. Role of information systems in supply chain management also discussed. Prerequisite: SCM330.

SCM490 Selected Topics in Supply Chain Management (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

Teacher Education (TCH)

TCH160 Child Development (3 crs.)

Considers the processes of the growth and development of young children from birth through the early school years as well as the implications these processes have for the education of young children. Presents techniques for observing and recording observational data. Regularly scheduled observations in an early childhood setting required.

TCH205 The American School (3 crs.)

Focuses on the contemporary school. Introduces in perspective philosophies, functions, and structures that have shaped American education. Examines present educational practices and conceptions of learning as they relate to changing scientific, social, and technological realities. Studies American youth in relation to the school, the world of work, and contemporary diversity in ethical and aesthetic positions. Some of the most disturbing issues confronting the American school are defined and analyzed.

TCH250 Elements of Instruction (3 crs.)

Emphasis on introducing current validated instructional models of teaching, and developing technical skills needed for effective classroom management. The teacher as decision maker and growing professional stressed. Theoretical and practical applications to the classroom presented.

TCH255 Multicultural Issues and Strategies in Basic Education (3 crs.)

Examines topics and methodologies for development of instructional strategies that promote multicultural content with existing curricula. Topics include cross-cultural communication through education, cultural influences in learning, and assessment. Techniques for teaching LEP (Limited English Proficient) and ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) students also explored.

TCH260 Educational Psychology (3 crs.)

Focuses upon dynamic learning situations. Alternative theories of the learning process are reviewed with attention given to the application of behavioral and cognitive techniques in the classroom, agency or industrial teaching program. Topics include problem solving and creativity, retention and transfer of knowledge, individual differences and human abilities, and motivational theory. Prerequisite: PSY101 or PSY102.

TCH303 Books and Materials for Children (3 crs.)

Surveys children's literature and related materials. Evaluation, selection, and use of various materials to meet the curricular and personal needs of children with attention on materials for special groups. Study of the interests of children from preschool age to early adolescence is carried out.

TCH321 Language and Reading in the Elementary School (3 crs.)

Designed to explore the curriculum in language arts to acquaint students with how children learn language and to identify appropriate strategies and materials for use in teaching oral and written language in its many forms. Classroom participation on an assigned basis.

TCH341 Mathematics in the Elementary School (3 crs.)

Acquaints students with the characteristics of a modern program in elementary mathematics. Emphasis on the structure of our system of numeration, learning by discovery, and provision for the great range of ability in a class. Students are alerted to ways in which conventional arithmetic may be greatly enriched and strengthened by applying the basic laws, principles and set terminology clearly defined and effectively used in modern mathematics. Methods of mathematical thinking as well as the basic concept of mathematics explored. Classroom participation on an assigned basis.

TCH345 Assessment and Evaluation Strategies (3 crs.)

Explores concepts of assessment in all areas of teaching. Specifically focuses on assessment of language/communication skills as a basis for an understanding of diagnostic processes.

TCH346 Science in the Elementary School (3 crs.)

Introduces prospective teachers to the organization of science in the elementary schools, strategies and methods of science teaching, evaluation methods, acquisition and use of materials, and planning lessons. Students will have first-hand experience with new curricula, textbooks, and environmental issues. Emphasis on selection and use of activities to promote learning of science concepts, processes and attitudes. Classroom participation on an assigned basis.

TCH347 Social Studies in the Elementary School (3 crs.)

Surveys contemporary and traditional teaching methods and strategies as they relate to the various social sciences. Stresses the incorporation and evaluation of a rich variety of instructional materials that can be utilized in unit teaching. Includes ways of individualizing a social studies program as well as small group instruction. Explores current topics including cultural diversity, values, career education, environmental education, and consumer education. Classroom participation on an assigned basis.

TCH393 Selected Topics in Elementary Education (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

TCH423 Integrating Literature in Middle Grades (3 crs.)

Focuses on broadening knowledge base and understanding of children's/young adults' literature available for use with students in content area study. Literature discussed with exploration of incorporating it into middle level content subjects and using it as a tool to enhance literacy and content learning.

TCH440 Gender Equity in Education (3 crs.)

Surveys role of women in educational systems, focusing on women as students, teachers, and administrators. Examines how traditional expectations of women are perpetuated throughout the educational system.

TCH445 Strategies for Effective Classroom Management (3 crs.)

Presents historical perspective of past practices in classroom management strategies, including discipline techniques. Relates current school law to what is legal for teachers in managing classrooms. Surveys current theories and programs regarding classroom and time management strategies. Provides practical suggestions based upon research findings as to how to more effectively and efficiently develop a proactive environment conducive to instruction. Explores multicultural settings and inclusion dynamics as they relate to classroom management strategies.

TCH490 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

TCH501 Effective Teaching: Theory and Practice (3 crs.)

Emphasis on assisting teachers to understand and utilize the research and data-based principles of effective teaching. Included are planning and management techniques which enable effective teachers to make efficient use of class time while preventing discipline problems. Theories and practical applications of various discipline models, creative teaching techniques, and self-assessment devices presented.

TCH502 Strategies for Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving (3 crs.)

Offers both a research base and real-world classroom applications for infusing critical thinking and problem-solving into all levels of curricular areas. Encourages participants to create learning environments fostering intellectual curiosity and inventiveness. Explores strategies that challenge students to pose problems and search for ways to solve them. Incorporates performance-based assessment.

TCH505 Instructional Technology for Today's Educator (3 crs.)

Students develop skills in using current technologies to support instruction in a variety of settings. Multimedia software, web page development, and distance learning design and implementation are required. Students examine various aspects of interactive and noninteractive technologies and make instructional applications. Evaluating appropriate hardware and software configurations for delivering instruction is included. Students will use technology to research and develop real life classroom curricular solutions.

TCH511 Elementary School Curriculum and Assessment (3 crs.)

Surveys existing elementary school programs and research to determine and evaluate curricular models and assessment issues. Investigates such areas as purposes of education, curricular content, scope and sequence, classroom climate, standards, and program evaluation.

TCH524 Middle School Curriculum and Assessment (3 crs.)

Surveys basic characteristics of middle school organizational patterns, curriculum design, and evaluation models. Evaluates student development, instructional strategies, and assessment issues. Reviews these areas based on current research.

TCH542 Modern Elementary School Mathematics: Its Content and Method (3 crs.)

Deals with the structure of mathematics: reasoning, sets, numeration systems, operations and their properties and number sentences (equalities and inequalities). Discovery learning of the mathematics is emphasized. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in teaching of mathematics or permission of the instructor.

TCH543 Diagnostic Techniques in Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School (3 crs.)

Designed to help the classroom teacher develop skills in diagnostic teaching of elementary school mathematics. Various learning theories and their implications for mathematics development discussed. A case study interpreting data from standardized and informal tests and applying this diagnostic information to remediation activities required. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in teaching of mathematics or permission of the instructor.

TCH545 Earth Science for Elementary Teachers (3 crs.)

Comprehensive study of the earth, including its origin, structure, rocks, soils and minerals, land forms, water, weather and climate in relation to the solar system. The interrelationships between the earth and its peoples are emphasized. The special needs of the elementary teacher are considered.

TCH546 Teaching Science in the Elementary School (3 crs.)

Explores a variety of strategies and techniques for effective N-8 science teaching. An understanding of related science principles is interwoven with practical applications for the classroom. Science curriculum construction and analysis is an emphasis. Science, technological, and societal connections are considered. Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in elementary science methods or permission of the instructor.

TCH560 Making Social Studies Dynamic (3 crs.)

Eliminates the "bore" and "gore" from social studies by studying the impact of dynamic forces on the technological age of information. Explores the arena for modern media literacy. Examines social forces, controversial issues, current events, cooperative learning, conflict resolution, and pragmatic research findings about the social studies. Investigates how to make the classroom teacher's social studies more relevant and meaningful. Prerequisite: An undergraduate course in teaching of social studies or permission of the instructor.

TCH575 Advanced Child Development (3 crs.)

Stresses the results of scientific studies which are used to examine cognitive, physical, and social processes in child development from birth to pre-adolescence with an emphasis placed on the early years. Influence of child's environment, home, and school explored.

TCH594 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

TCH599 Independent Study (3 crs.)

TCH600 Elements of Research (3 crs.)

Includes a study of the nature and types of research, the selection of appropriate research topics, research techniques including simple statistics, the use of the library resources in research and the systematic collection, evaluation and presentation of research data. Students are guided in developing an action research project in the area of elementary education. Students who have departmental approval and are enrolled in TCH612 and/or TCH613, Thesis, may use the course to assist them in preparing a research proposal. TCH600 must be completed within the first 15 crs. leading to a master's degree.

TCH605 Research Seminar (3 crs.)

Presents formal literature reviews of topics related to instructional utilization of computers. Students are required to conduct library research projects as well as action research projects. Seminar leadership on selected topics responsibility of the instructor and students.

TCH609 Internship and Action Research Seminar (3 crs.)

Designed for graduate students to engage in supervised professional activities in selected early childhood, elementary, middle school or secondary education placements.

TCH612 Thesis I (3 crs.)

TCH613 Thesis II (3 crs.)

Theatre (THE)

THE121 Introduction to the Theatre (3 crs.)

Introduces theatre as an art form. Designed to stimulate a taste for theatre, improve standards for critical judgment, consider theatre's relation to allied arts, and provide an understanding of the part it plays in the social and cultural development of civilization.

THE222 Acting II (3 crs.)

Provides an introduction to scene study and textual analysis. Students will present scenes from modern and contemporary dramatic literature. Also studies the theories behind a variety of methodologies. Specific acting techniques examined. Prerequisite: THE123.

THE229 Introduction to Technical Production (3 crs.)

Introductory course in technical theatre. Areas of study include stagecraft, scenery design, and basic lighting design. Students also expected to engage in technical laboratory work as part of supervised extracurricular activity functioning at the time. Such involvement considered as part of the student's grade.

THE320 Directing (3 crs.)

Study of the theories and practice essential to directing a play, including play selection, casting, director-actor interpretation and relationship, blocking, rehearsal procedures and coordinating the technical and nontechnical parts of the production. Students expected to engage in evening histrionic laboratory work as part of supervised campus extracurricular theatrical activity functioning at the time. Such involvement is considered a part of the student's grade.

THE324 Theatre Practicum (3 crs.)

Requires the theatre student to perform and to supervise work production areas done in conjunction with supervised campus theatre activities or with approved off-campus extracurricular activities. For each area completed the student is graded for one credit hour. Areas in which the student may engage are: directing, multimedia presentation, set construction, costume design or construction, set design, lighting, sound, front of house, theatre management, stage manager, assistant to the director, or acting.

THE327 Costumes and Make-Up (3 crs.)

Detailed survey of clothing history with emphasis on periods most useful to contemporary theatrical production (i.e., classical, medieval, 17th, 18th and 19th centuries). Implications regarding trends in the morality, social values, and psychology of dress will be generated to establish a fundamental basis for theatrical design. Make-up and costume design, rendering, and construction techniques will be practically implemented in a laboratory situation. Students expected to engage in evening technical laboratory work as part of supervised campus extracurricular theatrical activity functioning at the time. Such involvement considered a part of the student's grade.

THE329 Theatre History (3 crs.)

Survey of the history of the theatre from its roots to current times. Investigates the origins of theatre in ancient religions, the evolution of performance spaces, the development of drama, and the changing styles of performance, as well as relationships between these facets.

THE395 Theatre Internship (3 crs.)

A one semester, full or part-time position in a theatre related work environment. Work content is arranged and approved by the department, the departmental chair and the dean's office in advance. A faculty supervisor will act as a liaison between the place of employment and the student intern. On-site visits by the faculty supervisor are a part of the evaluation process.

THE396 Theatre Internship (3 crs.)

A one semester, full or part-time position in a theatre related work environment. Work content is arranged and approved by the department, the departmental chair and the dean's office in advance. A faculty supervisor will act as a liaison between the place of employment and the student intern. On-site visits by the faculty supervisor a part of the evaluation process.

THE490 Selected Topics Theatre (3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental interest not covered by regular course offerings. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Women’s Studies (WST)

WST100 Introduction to Women's Studies (3 crs.)

Provides an interdisciplinary consideration of the scholarly theories and research relevant to the experience and status of women in America. Examines a wide range of social issues that have historically affected the status of American women and continue to affect women today. Explores the diversity of the lives of American women through reading, writing and discussion. Equal attention given to African-American women, Asian-American women, Native American women, Hispanic women and women of European ethnic groups. Perhaps most important is learning how attitudes, perspectives, and beliefs about women and men are shaped by ethnic and racial heritage, by age and social class, by sexual orientation, by physical and mental abilities, and by cultural constructions of gender. Course fulfills the university's diversity requirement.

WST200 Independent Study in Women's Studies (3 crs.)

Independent study project must have approval of the director of the Women's Studies minor.

WST300 Seminar in Women's Studies (3 crs.)

Integrates each student's special interests within the interdisciplinary Women's Studies Minor. Provides a sequenced set of opportunities for upper-level students to demonstrate their ability to critique, compare and connect what they have studied while pursuing the Women's Studies Minor. Students encouraged to interrelate their lives and major field of study with what they have learned in Women's Studies. Students encouraged to take cross-cultural approaches to women's issues. Will examine feminist theory, its creation and operation, and especially the influence on feminism of (and its influence on) postmodern concepts of knowledge as situated (dependent on time, place and the thinker) and as mediated (dependent for expression on language). Through reading and writing on a variety of works, we will consider women's issues, women's lives and our own lives. Students have opportunity for creative representation (i.e. writing a story, making a film, designing an art project, etc.). Students may also do a project involving community service. Prerequisites: WST100 plus 6 elective hours in Women's Studies or permission of the instructor.

WST390 Internship in Women's Studies (3 crs.)

Internship must be approved by both the student's major department and the Women's Studies Minor director.