Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering

The Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering program at Shippensburg University provides a balance between theory and practice, and is designed to meet national academic requirements. Ship’s EE program prepares students for careers in a broad array of electrical engineering fields including:

  • Semiconductor and circuit design
  • Mixed-signal embedded systems
  • Industrial controls
  • Communications system engineering

The BS in Electrical Engineering focuses on electrical devices, their theory of operation, and the related science. The program combines advanced physics, including courses in electricity and magnetism, quantum physics, electronics, and semiconductors. The program includes advanced study in non-linear electronics, micro-controllers, control systems, signals and systems, digital logic and reconfigurable computing. Graduates of the program will be well prepared to develop electronic systems for industry or government applications; and be prepared to purse advanced study at the graduate level.

Students will learn about the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and social context. Graduates will have an ability to use techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice, and will engage in life-long learning to continue developing their skills and knowledge of the practice.

The program at Ship will provide sufficient skills for students to pursue their careers as computer engineers; or they may easily transition into any of the careers followed by computer science generalists. Additionally, students will be well qualified for further study in a post-baccalaureate program.

Engineering Versus Engineering Technology Degrees

Engineering programs present a focus on engineering theory and design, supported through advanced science and higher-level mathematics through advanced calculus and differential equations. Engineering Technology programs typically focus on applied sciences and mathematics such as algebra and applied calculus. Graduates of an engineering program may be called engineers; graduates of a four-year engineering technology program are called engineering technologists. Graduates of an engineering program are prepared to continue on to advanced study at the master’s or doctoral level. Graduates of an engineering program may work to earn the professional engineer license; whereas the National Society of Professional Engineers opposes acceptance of engineering technology. ABET provides a good summary that describes the differences.

Shippensburg University offers the only Electrical Engineering program in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. Students in this program learn about the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and social context. Graduates will have an ability to use techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice, and will engage in life-long learning to continue developing their skills and knowledge of the practice.

Demand for electrical engineers is growing, driven by the rapid pace of technological innovation and development. This is particularly true in the area of research and development. Ship students have plenty of opportunities to gain hands-on experience through internships, recruitment, and participation in research projects through department partnerships with regional industries.

Students in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Shippensburg University have full access to a broad array of laboratory equipment-a state-of-the-art printed circuit board fabrication lab, rework stations, programming stations, and test benches. Specialized laboratory instruments, which support classes that involve modern high-speed digital logic and radio-frequency devices (RF), include a signal generator, a spectrum analyzer, and a logic analyzer.

Engineering Core

  • ENGR 100 - Engineering Seminar I
  • ENGR 200 - Engineering Seminar II
  • ENGR 300 - Engineering Seminar III
  • ENGR 110 - Modeling
  • ENGR 120 - Programming for Engineers
  • ENGR 310 - Statistical Process Control
  • MAT 375 - Probability and Statistics for Engineers

Math Cognate Courses - 19 credits

  • MAT 211 - Calculus I
  • MAT 212 - Calculus II
  • MAT 213 - Calculus III
  • MAT 225 - Discrete Mathematics
  • MAT 322 - Differential Equations

Physics Cognate Courses - 28 credits

  • PHY 205/PHY 123 - Intermediate Physics I
  • PHY 206/PHY 125 - Intermediate Physics II
  • PHY 301 - Mathematical and Numerical Techniques in the Sciences
  • PHY 311 - Quantum I
  • PHY 321 - Electricity and Megnetism I

Computer Engineering Courses- 14 credits

  • CMPE 220 - Computer Organization
  • CMPE 322 - Microcontrollers & Interfaces
  • CMPE 420 - Digital and Reconfigurable Computing
  • CMPE 498 - Engineering Research Methods
  • CMPE 499 - Engineering Design & Development

Student can choose either CMPE 498 or CMPE 499

Electrical Engineering Courses - 20 credits

  • ELEC 210 - Signals and Systems
  • ELEC 300 - Foundations of Electronic Systems
  • ELEC 360 - Communications

Electives - CMPE or ELEC courses, 300 level or above, or Internship

Physics Engineering Courses - 8 credits

  • PHY 325 - Semiconductor Devices
  • PHY 255 - Electronics

CMPE220 Computer Organization

Credits: 4
Description:  Introduces organization and architecture of computer systems from the standard von Neumann model to more recent architectural concepts. Internal structure and organization of a computer leads to significant differences in performance and functionality, giving rise to an extraordinary range of computing devices from hand-held computer to large-scale, high performance machines. To gain a better understanding of exactly how a computer functions, students will write programs in a common assembly language.

Prerequisites: CSC 111 for level with C or better or ELEC 100 with C or better) AND MAT 225 with C or better

CMPE322 Microcontrollers & Interfaces

Credits: 4
Description:  Students will use basic microprocessors and TTL logic components to created embedded solutions to real-world problems including: basic device control, serial and wireless communications, EEPROM storage and retrieval, and interfacing with analog sensors. Students will use assembly and C languages for software development, and will use basic electronics skills to connect components. COREQUISITE: PHY313 Intermediate Physics 2

Prerequisites: (CMPE 220 or CSC 220 with C or better) AND PHY 355 with C or better

CMPE420 Digital and Reconfigurable Computing

Credits: 4
Description:  Students will develop solutions using high performance digital circuits based on embedded processors and Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). Students will use Verilog to create, simulate, and test their solutions, and to ensure they meet the timing and packaging constraints of the problem. Students will also write code for portable computer systems, such as PDA’s and cell phones.

Prerequisites: CMPE 320

CMPE498 Engineering Research Methods

Credits: 2
Description:  Computer and Electrical Engineering students enrolled in this course will work under the direction with faculty to conduct directed research in an area related to Computer and/or Electrical Engineering. Students will use basic research strategies, including literature reviews, designing experiments, and conducting tests to complete a research project. Students are expected to produce results that lead to external publication at a conference or in a journal. This course is designated as a capstone course for Computer and Electrical Engineering. Although the course is two credit hours, students should expect to work considerably more to complete their projects. 

Prerequisites: CMPE 322 with C or better

CMPE499 Engineering Design and Development

Credits: 2
Description:  Computer and Electrical Engineering students will work together in development teams to complete a development task. Starting from a given problem, they will plan and design a solution to that problem, and then go on to implement and test their plan. Students demonstrate their capabilities by using the engineering method to analyze the problem to develop requirements, estimate time and costs, perform safety and risk analysis, and develop an implementation plan. The team will then follow that implementation plan to develop their solution and demonstrate their final product. This course is designated as a capstone course for both Computer and Electrical Engineering. Although the course meets for 2 credit hours per week, students should expect to work substantially more hours with their team, outside of class. Graduate students are not permitted to take this course.

Prerequisites: CMPE 322 with C or better

ELEC210 Signals and Systems

Credits: 4
Description:  Signals and systems covers the basic concepts of signals and system modeling. Students will learn about the differences between time-domain and frequency domain representation of a signal and modes of analysis. Students will also learn about continuous and discrete signals analysis using a number of different techniques (e.g. Fourier Analysis). Students will use state of the art tools (e.g. MATLAB) to simulate and analyze systems that use signals propagation.

Prerequisites: MAT 212 with C or better.

ELEC230 Instrumentation

Credits: 3
Description:  This course provides an overview of the different mechanisms and instruments used to measure physical values such as temperature, pressure, flow, and force; that are common in modern industrial processes. The course provides background in the sources of measurement error and methods to compensate for them. 

Prerequisites: PHY206 or PHY222 with C or better.

ELEC300 Foundations of Electronic Systems

Credits: 4
Description:  Foundations of electronic systems including basic circuit theory, and fundamental and composite devices. Advanced circuit theory includes circuit analysis laws including KVL and KCL, lumped matter approach, and isomorphic analysis. Basic devices (e.g., resistors and capacitors) will be modeled and used to construct composite devices (e.g., transformer is constructed from two mutual inductors). Non-linear devices (e.g., transistors and diodes) will also be modeled and used to construct other basic systems (e.g., amplifiers, voltage regulators). Students will use and extend PSPICE to model the ideal behavior of these systems. 

Prerequisites: MAT212 with C or better and PHY221 with C or better.

ELEC323 Electronic Design and Processes

Credits: 4
Description:  Students will learn the principles of designing advanced circuits using state-of-the-art CAD tools to create a schematic within given engineering constraints, including factors such as functionality, physical limitations, cost, standard parts inventories, reliability, verifiability, signal integrity, and manufacturing complexity. Students will use advanced simulation tools to verify their designs. Students will learn about Printed Circuit Boards (PCBs), and will create a PCB layout for their schematic. Students will then use the lab facilities to manufacture their board, from blank copper plates to populated board. This board will then be inspected, verified, and reworked as needed. Finally, the student will learn how to use system programmers and debuggers to load their software onto the board, and deliver a completed system. 

Prerequisites: CMPE 322 with C or better.

ELEC330 Control Systems

Credits: 3
Description:  This is a study of the design and implementation of control systems used across a wide range of modern mechanical and electrical systems. This course explores the theory behind control systems allows us to effectively model their behavior, including frequency and time domain models of these systems. Both open- and closed-loop control systems are developed, with a special emphasis on the PID controller. Students will ultimately learn how to take measurements from a physical system and build a model of that system, develop a control system that meets engineering requirements, and then actually implement that control system using MATLAB. Finally, students will compare the theoretical results and the actual results of their control systems.

Prerequisites: ELEC 230 with C or better or CMPE 322 with C or better 

ELEC360 Communications Systems

Credits: 4
Description:  Introduction to analog and digital communication systems. Emphasis on engineering applications of theory to communication system design. Students will study the basics of sampling quantization, coding, signal detection, and digital modulation schemes including AM, FM, PAM, and PCM. Transmission of information and system performance in the presence of noise will be covered. Students will use state of the art tools such as MATLAB to analyze communication systems limited by bandwidth and noise.

Prerequisites: ELEC 210 with C or better.

ELEC422 High Speed Circuits

Credits: 4
Description:  Students will learn about analog and mixed-signal circuits including high-speed clocks, phase-lock- loops, A/D and D/A converters, and amplifiers. Students will also learn about principles of high-speed communications, including energy and band-width constrained waveforms, and various forms of signal modulations, and data encodings (e.g. 8/10b encoding).

Prerequisites: CMPE322 with C or better.

ENGR100 Engineering Seminar 1

Credits: 1
Description:  The goal of this course is to prepare the student for study in an engineering discipline.   This will include general skills for achieving success in college in addition to an introduction to the engineering disciplines and the engineering development process.

ENGR110 Modeling and Simulation

Credits: 3
Description:  An introduction to modeling physical systems and simulating them using scientific computation software. Topics will include modeling dynamic systems, the basic mathematics of modeling physical systems, including difference equations, arithmetic and geometric series, spring-damper systems, open- and closed- loop systems. To support these topics, students will learn to use the MATLAB and Simulink systems, including basic expression evaluation, scalar, vector, and multi-dimensional variables, conditionals, repetition, and writing basic functions. 

Prerequisites: Math placement 6.

ENGR120 Programming for Engineers

Credits: 3
Description:  An introduction to programming for electrical engineers. This course is a highly focused introduction to programming in C language. It covers the basics of programming including procedures, variables, types, loop, and control structures. The course introduces basic computing resources, and introduces algorithmic solutions to common engineering and numerical problems.

Prerequisites: Math placement 6

ENGR200 Engineering Seminar 2

Credits: 1
Description:  This course is focused on the tools that teams use to engineer solutions together.  Participation in a team project will help the students learn about and apply current team coordination tools for project management, configuration management, and personal improvement.

ENGR300 Engineering Seminar 3

Credits: 1
Description:  The goal of this course is to prepare the student for upper class courses and entering the workplace.  Career preparation will include strategies for finding internships and full-time positions and preparing for the hiring process (building a resume, writing a cover letter, and interviewing).  Academic preparation will be focused on how to find and read journal publications on a given topic.

ENGR310 Statistical Process Control

Credits: 3
Description:  The course will develop the students’ understanding of statistical process control. A variety of control charts will be used for assessing process stability and estimation of process capability.  We will also study how engineers design experiments based on statistical quality control for the purpose of controlling, improving, and optimizing the engineering process.

Prerequisites: MAT 375 with C or better.

Demand for electrical engineers is growing, driven by the rapid pace of technological innovation and development. This is particularly true in the area of research and development. Ship students have plenty of opportunities to gain hands-on experience through internships, recruitment, and participation in research projects through department partnerships with regional industries.

Graduates will have the skills necessary to design, build, test, and manage complex systems, skills that are in increasing demand in Pennsylvania and the surrounding region. Pennsylvania is expected to see a 9.2 percent increase in the demand for Electrical Engineers through 2020.

As a result of need outpacing supply, wages are forecast to increase 12 percent for Electrical Engineers to $80,470 in 2020. In neighboring Maryland, there is 12.5 percent growth forecast in the same year period, with wages rising to $109,440.

This program is designed to prepare electrical engineers with a solid grasp of technology and a broad background in sciences and humanities.

It is an industry-focused program with coursework that includes significant hands-on activities designed to complement academy theory. Our industry partners helped us develop the program so that graduates will be well prepared to enter the workforce.

These goals are achieved through a curriculum that combines a broad liberal arts general education program with a rigorous set of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses.

The 120-credit undergraduate Electrical Engineering degree program at Shippensburg University includes:

  • 33 credits in Computer and Electrical Engineering
  • 19 credits in Mathematics
  • 24 credits in Physics
  • 39 credits in General Education

Program Objectives

The graduates of the Electrical Engineering program will be prepared to achieve the following career objectives:

  • Satisfying work in a field of their choice (corporate or academic)
    • Have obtained a satisfying position
    • Have confidence in their ability to move to their next position of choice
  • Continue to be an effective and productive member of his/her workplace by applying the fundamentals taught in our program
    • Effective problem solving skills
    • Effective communication
    • Critical thinking
    • Sound business practices
    • Professional standards
    • Behaving in accordance with professional ethics
  • Remain a member of his/her larger community by
    • Participating actively in professional organizations
    • Using expertise through volunteering
  • Continue to learn and develop within his/her field of interest by participating in
    • Workshops/Training
    • Certifications
    • Graduate School
    • Self study
  • Expand breadth of scope and leadership role and advance toward one or more of the following career paths: technical, managerial, or business

Student Outcomes

The expected outcomes of this program give students the ability to:

  1. Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  2. Design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  3. Design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  4. Function on multidisciplinary teams
  5. Identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  6. Understand professional and ethical responsibility
  7. Communicate effectively
  8. Obtain the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  9. Recognize the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  10. Gain knowledge of contemporary issues
  11. Use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

Enrollment & Graduation Statistics for the Electrical Engineering Program

YEAR
2016/17
2017/18
2018/19
ENROLLED
26
22
19
GRADUATED
0
3

Note: Enrolled is the total number of students in the program - not the number of incoming students

Students in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Shippensburg University have full access to a broad array of laboratory equipment-a state-of-the-art printed circuit board fabrication lab, rework stations, programming stations, and test benches. Specialized laboratory instruments, which support classes that involve modern high-speed digital logic and radio-frequency devices (RF), include a signal generator, a spectrum analyzer, and a logic analyzer.