Highlights


Academic Innovation Conference, Oct 17, 2014.  Registration closes Oct 14.

Innovations in Supporting International Students Symposium, Nov 6, 2014.  Registration closes Oct 31.

Innovations in Faculty Development Symposium, June 2, 2015

spacer image

Contact Information

Dr. Christina M. Sax
Horton Hall 111
1871 Old Main Drive
Shippensburg University
Shippensburg, PA, 17257
(717) 477-1502
(717) 477-4050 fax
pcde@ship.edu

spacer image

Past Conferences

2012 Conference
2013 Conference

Past Symposia

Faculty Development

spacer image

Academic Outreach and Innovation Newsletter

February, 2013

CONTENTS
2013 Summer, Fall, and Winter Online Classes 
PASSHE Virtual Conference 
Faculty Grant Opportunities 
Upcoming Webinar Opportunities 
Faculty/Program Spotlight 
Resources of Interest 
Off-Load Activities Through PCDE 

SU is offering a degree completion program leading to a bachelor’s degree in Management in Harrisburg and Gettysburg.

For students who have earned 48-60 college credits. Come to an info session and have your unofficial transcript evaluated. Online and evening classes at Dixon University Center and HACC-Gettysburg are affordable, reputable, and convenient.

 

2013 Summer, Fall, and Winter Online Classes

Planning to teach online at Ship for the first time in summer 2013 or fall 2013? Be sure to complete the required Teaching Online Certification Course (TOCC), if you haven’t already done so. TOCC is a five week fully online training. The next session is scheduled to begin on February 14 and end on March 24. The last day to register for this training session is February 11. Faculty scheduled to teach online for the first time in summer 2013 will be given first preference for a limited number of seats in the training course. To register, contact Donna Panzo at DMPANZ@ship.edu.

The TOCC training course has been developed collaboratively by Shippensburg, Clarion, Kutztown, Lock Haven, and California Universities. Successful completion of this course satisfies Article 42 C.2. of the collective bargaining agreement. Faculty who have not previously taught an online course (80% or more online) at Ship must complete TOCC. This includes faculty who have taught online at other Universities.

 This 5-week totally online course provides instructors with a student’s perspective, guidance on designing an online course, and instructions for using the various Desire2Learn tools. This is not a self-paced course. Participants will be required to read course materials, participate in weekly discussion boards, collaborate in a group project, and develop content relevant to their own online course. In order to complete the activities and course development exercises, participants must have a course they are scheduled (or planning) to teach online within the next year. The time commitment will be approximately 10 hours/week depending on your familiarity with Desire2Learn. We hope that all participants will look at this experience as positive and beneficial to successfully developing their online course.

Planning to teach a new online course during the 2013 Winter Term? The 2013 Winter term begins in December, 2013 and ends in January, 2014. Avoid the time crunch this fall, and submit your UCC proposal this spring! Double check the UCC distance education course approval process at http://www.ship.edu/assets/0/153/197751/c6ddd78a-6a62-4767-9412-1957961aa87b.pdf to verify whether your course proposal should be routed through the expedited or full approval process.

 

PASSHE Virtual Conference 

PASSHE’s 2013 virtual conference, Transforming the Teaching & Learning Environment, provides an opportunity to engage with education professionals from around the world - all from the convenience of your office or home. Scheduled for Feb 11-22, the 60 one-hour sessions will all be delivered live via Blackboard Collaborate and allow you to interact with the presenters and your fellow participants. Plus, all sessions will be closed captioned. Sessions were chosen by selecting the best and most current sessions from more than 20 national and international conferences in the past year, and presenters were invited to give their sessions again - virtually.

 Presenters are from all over the U.S, plus Nepal, Australia, Canada, and England. As always, this virtual conference remains free to PASSHE faculty and staff. This year’s topics include: Accessibility, Course Design, Flipped Classroom, Institutional Issues, iPads in Teaching, ITV/Videoconferencing, Quality Matters, STEM, and Teaching & Learning. As always, the sessions will be recorded and archived for later viewing.

View session topics, presenters, and times at: http://www.passhe.edu/inside/asa/DEConf/Pages/2013-Sessions-by-Date.aspx 

Register at: https://www.research.net/s/PASSHEVirtualConference  

 

Faculty Grant Opportunities

CFEST Travel Grant Program: March 1, 2013 is the next due date for faculty proposals for the CFEST Travel Grant Program and Faculty Training and Continuing Education (FTCE) Program. For more information on these programs visit http://www.ship.edu/CFEST/Grants/Overview/.

NEW!!! Academic Quality and Innovation Grant Program: The Academic Quality and Innovation Grant (AQI) program is designed to engage departments, faculty, and the curriculum in academic initiatives focused designed to increase student engagement, success, and retention, academic quality, and the achievement of student learning outcomes. Additionally, the program is designed to integrate such initiatives occurring at the national level into Ship’s ongoing practices and to assist faculty in furthering their professional development. The deadline to submit proposals is March 28, 2013. For additional information, including the proposal form, visit http://www.ship.edu/Innovation/Academic_Innovation_Grants.

NEW!!! Quality Matters Scholar Program: The Quality Matters Scholars (QMS) program is designed to assist faculty in incorporating the course design principles of the Quality Matters Program (QM, www.qmprogram.org) into online, blended, and face-to-face classes in ways that are designed to increase student engagement, success, and retention, academic quality, and the achievement of student learning outcomes. Additionally, the program is designed to develop a cadre of Ship faculty to serve as QM leaders on the Ship campus, and to assist faculty in furthering their professional development. The deadline to submit proposals is March 28, 2013. For additional information, including the proposal form, visit http://www.ship.edu/Innovation/Academic_Innovation_Grants. 

 

Upcoming Webinar Opportunities 

Mark your calendar for the following upcoming webinars which will be hosted on the Ship campus. (To nominate additional webinars for future sponsorship, contact Chris Sax at CSAX@ship.edu.)

Feb 12, 1:00-2:00 pm, LL205: Redesigning General Psychology at Frostburg State University. This webinar provides an overview of efforts to apply the principles of the National Center for Academic Transformation (NCAT) to the redesign of a general psychology course.

Feb 12, 2:00-3:00 pm, LL205: Understanding the Impact of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).  This webinar examines the impact of MOOCs on higher education, highlighting applicable lessons in technology-enabled instruction and the emerging possibility of an alternative credentialing market enabled by digital badges, employer-led curricula, and dynamic social networking tools.

Feb 19, 12:00-1:00 pm, LL205: From Flipped Classroom to Dual Enrollment: How ENMU Achieved Campus-Wide Capture in 12 Months. This webinar provides an overview of Eastern New Mexico University’s efforts to support graduate programs and to develop flipped, blended, and asynchronous distance learning classes for traditional, non-traditional, and off-campus students using Mediasite.

Mar 1, 1:00-2:00 pm, LL205. The Top 10 Most Successful Student Retention Strategies, Part 1. This two part webinar will cover the five critical elements of a retention framework along with constructs and principles for effective retention research, planning, implementation, and assessment. Part 1 discusses the elements of the retention framework. (Part 2 of this webinar will occur on Mar 8.)

Mar 5, 1:00-2:00, LL205. Industry Insights: Big Data. This webinar provides an overview of Big Data (the vast and proliferating amount of information capturable from electronic commerce through digital imaging, smart phones, RFID tagging, and social media content), and the growing need for data scientists in the workplace (professionals combining programming, statistics and business domain skills).

Mar 8, 1:00-2:00 pm, LL205. The Top 10 Most Successful Student Retention Strategies, Part 2. This two part webinar will cover the five critical elements of a retention framework along with constructs and principles for effective retention research, planning, implementation, and assessment. Part 2 discusses best practices in student retention.

Mar 12, 1:00-2:00 pm, LL205: Redesigning Computing and Information Literacy.  This webinar provides an overview of efforts to apply the principles of the National Center for Academic Transformation (NCAT) to the redesign of a computing and information literacy courses.

Mar 13, 2:00-3:00 pm, LL205: Blended Learning Toolkit: Design, Deliver, Assess.  This webinar is designed to help faculty determine the opportunities for blended learning in their classes, and a methodology for developing blended classes. Topics will include: which course elements are most suitable to bring online, how much to bring online, how to make sound strategic plans for course design and delivery, how to establish data collection and assessment protocols.

Apr 9, 1:00-2:00 pm, LL205: Redesigning Developmental Math.  This webinar provides an overview of efforts to apply the principles of the National Center for Academic Transformation (NCAT) to the redesign of developmental math courses. (http://www.thencat.org/States/TN/Abstracts/CSCC%20Algebra_Abstract.htm and http://www.thencat.org/States/TN/Abstracts/CSTCC%20Algebra_Abstract.htm)

 

Faculty/Program Spotlight 

"Distance Education Tips," Liz Fisher, Associate Professor, Social Work and Gerontology 

Teaching via videoconferencing may sound like your worst nightmare, especially if your teaching style focuses on active learning. However awkward this technology may be, you can still “be yourself” when teaching on camera. It will never be exactly like having all of your students in the same classroom, but your style and personality can still come through despite the distance. I offer a few tips that have helped me incorporate my usual styles into videoconference teaching.

Be honest. On the first night of class, I acknowledge the awkwardness of videoconferencing and that it requires us to be patient. I ask students to be patient with me and I promise to do the same with them. I usually tell them a few of the realities of videoconferencing and find way to make them laugh about it. I admit that it sometimes feels like being on the stage and they will probably be uncomfortable with it at first, but with practice the technology piece will be less of a distraction.

Ask every student to speak in the first class. Students will be hesitant to participate if they are new to a videoconference format. You can ask for their names or use a more creative icebreaker that you would use in the traditional classroom. Go back and forth between sites with each student or each row so that you don’t have students on one side waiting for too long to be involved. Once they’ve moved past this initial barrier of being on camera and using technology, they are more likely to participate in future classes. This also helps set the tone that everyone is expected to participate.

Let students talk to each other across sites. I have been amazed to see that students actually get to know each other despite the distance between the sites. Encourage that they address each other with questions. When I do group activities I may ask that they develop questions to ask of another group that is located at the other site so that a conversation begins between them.

Use BIG name cards. It can be difficult to remember names when faces are hard to see on television screens so if it doesn’t seem too elementary, use big name cards that can be seen on the television for a few weeks. Usually if I explain why I’m doing this they are less likely to think it’s childish.  This also allows them to address each other by name, even across sites.

Do group work. When I do group activities in the traditional classroom, I provide instructions and then move around the classroom to see how they are progressing. It’s easy to address questions as they come up. In distance education, once you set them off on the group work, it can be difficult to hear because of the noise level of your site and the remote site. Questions from one site need to be heard by the other site. There are definitely difficulties, but it is worth it. More than ever, students need a break from the lecture format, especially those students who are watching you on the screen. With preparation, group activities are still possible. Try to develop specific instructions including how much time they will have in groups, that they need to appoint someone to report to the group and that you’ll check in several minutes to answer questions. You may need to “mute” the volume for both sites and if so, make sure the remote site knows how to signal you if they have a question and keep an eye on the screen.

Be conscientious about addressing students in all locations. When I ask for responses to a question, I often start with a statement such as, “let me see if there are any thoughts from students in (remote site) first.” After a few students have participated, I check in with the students in front of me. This discourages remote site students from hiding from class discussions and helps them feel included. It also helps me verify if they understand the concepts.

Try to spend equal time at the sites. This may or may not be realistic, depending on your program, but it makes all the difference. I once taught a videoconference course where I only went to the remote site once as an experiment and it did not work well. The students at the remote site had almost no connection to me or the students at the main site and it really encouraged an “us against them” mentality. Even if you can go a few times over the semester, it is well worth the travel and will allow you to use more interactive techniques because students will feel more comfortable with you. 

 

Resources of Interest 

High Impact Educational Practices, American Association of Colleges and Universities,  http://www.aacu.org/leap/documents/hip_tables.pdf  

Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education (VALUE) and Integrative Learning VALUE Rubric, American Association of Colleges and Universities,  http://www.aacu.org/value/rubrics/index_p.cfm?CFID=32729042&CFTOKEN=61307948 and http://assessment.aas.duke.edu/documents/integrativelearning.pdf  

Horizon Report: 2013 Higher Education Edition, The New Media Consortium and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI), http://www.nmc.org/publications/2013-horizon-report-higher-ed  

7 Things You Should Know About the Flipped Classroom, Educause Learning Initiative, http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7081.pdf  

Community of Practice Design Guide: A Step-by-Step Guide for Designing and Cultivating Communities of Practice in Higher Education, Educause National Learning Infrastructure Initiative, American Association for Higher Education, and iCohere, http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/nli0531.pdf  

Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States, Sloan Consortium, http://sloanconsortium.org/publications/survey/changing_course_2012  

Online Educational Delivery Models: A Descriptive View, Phil Hill, Educause Review, Nov/Dec, 2012, http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/online-educational-delivery-models-descriptive-view  

The Missing Element in Student Success, Mike Rose, Inside HigherEd, http://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2012/09/07/advice-using-classroom-teaching-enhance-student-success-essay  

 

Off-Load Activities Through PCDE 

Interested in exploring, developing, and offering an off-load credit or non-credit course or program through the Office of Professional, Continuing, and Distance Education? Contact Carolyn Callaghan (CMCALLAGHAN@ship.edu; x3275) to brainstorm your ideas and to get the process started. 

 

Suggestions and Contact Information 

· For questions about anything in this newsletter, contact Chris Sax at CSAX@ship.edu or x1348.

· To suggest items for inclusion in future newsletters, contact Jessica John at JLJOHN@ship.edu.

---------------------------------------------------

Academic Outreach and Innovation
 
www.ship.edu/innovation 

Follow us!
 
Twitter @ShipPCDE