Faculty Research Interests

 

Dr. Lea T. Adams - FSC121   477-1115

Research interests: 

My research interests are focused on the higher order cognitive processes (memory, problem solving, decision making, and critical thinking) and those things that influence their accuracy and efficacy.

Student roles: 

Students may assist me with an ongoing project or develop a research project of their own. Depending on the type or state of the research project, students role may include 1) reviewing literature, 2) generating an empirically testable research question, 3) designing a study, 4) collecting data and analyzing the data, 5) writing research papers, reports, or posters, and 6) presenting at conferences or submitting research for publication. Students are required to understand the purpose, techniques, measures, and results of any study with which they assist.

Requirements: 

It is best if students have taken a class with me, allowing me to evaluate their interest, capabilities, and general attitude toward research. They must be willing to attend research meetings and be available to conduct research with participants.

Willing to work with: 

  • Undergraduate students who are receiving credit
  • Undergraduates who are volunteering
  • Graduate students who are volunteering
  • Graduate students as a Masters Thesis supervisor

 

Dr. Angela Bartoli - FSC123   477-1107

Topics, projects: 

  • Cognition
  • Social Cognition currently working on misattributions of friendliness

Students Roles:

  • Library research
  • Research design
  • Running subjects
  • Data analysis

Requirements:
 

  • Prefer students who have taken RDS2
  • Prefer students who have received an A or B in one of my classes
  • Must be able to meet one hour per week on a regular basis
  • Must be available other times to run subjects

Willing to work with:
 

  • Undergraduate students who are receiving credit
  • Undergraduates who are volunteering
  • Graduate students who are volunteering
  • Graduate students as a Masters Thesis supervisor

 

Dr. Jamonn Campbell - FSC109   477-1146

Research Interests: 

  • Computer-mediated Communication  interests include problem solving, decision making, impression formation and social identity in CMC groups
  • Psychology of the internet interests include privacy, computer usage (e.g. gender gap, digital divide, etc.), and unrealistic optimism
  • Sport Fans - interests include sport fan identification, gender differences in motivation and behaviors of sport fans

Students Roles: 

Students participating as a member of the research team will be responsible for

  • Research theory and development
  • Writing research proposals
  • Data collection
  • Data entry and analysis
  • Presenting results at university, regional, and national conferences

Requirements: 

Students who are thinking about joining the research team should be interested in one or more of the project areas. Students should be: self motivated, comfortable working in groups, and familiar with computers and major statistical packages (e.g. SPSS, Excel, etc.).

Willing to work with: 

Undergraduate students who are interested in gaining research experience (volunteers and those receiving credit)
Graduate students who are volunteering or as a Master’s Thesis supervisorDr. Ken France - HH302   477-1108Topics, projects:As editor of the Psi High Newsletter, I am interested in working with students who would like to write articles for the newsletter.

Student roles: 

The students select topics, evaluate relevant, research, and write articles.

Requirements: 

I am interested in working with any students who want to become good writers.

Willing to work with: 

  • Undergraduate students who are receiving credit
  • Undergraduates who are volunteering
  • (Not available to work with graduate students)

 

Dr. James Griffith - FSC219   477-1374

Topics, projects: 

  • Research Methodology. I work on research questions across a variety of topics and am primarily interested in applying multivariate analyses to answer these questions. I typically work with secondary data or I collect data online.
  • Program Evaluation  I conduct evaluation (e.g., process, outcome, cost) on small scale programs (more are at the local level).

Students roles: 

Students who work with me will be working on my ongoing projects. Students will have the opportunity to participate in all of the research process that includes:

  • Preparing conference presentations
  • Preparing journal manuscripts
  • Project design
  • Literature Reviews
  • Stimuli development
  • Data analysis
  • Data collection and entry

Requirements: 

I prefer to work with students who have \ familiarity with SPSS and have taken one year of research design and statistics, and havean intention to go on to graduate or professional program of study. In addition, my expectation is for students in my lab to put in 5-8 hours/week.

Willing to work with: 

  • Undergraduate students who are receiving credit
  • Undergraduates who are volunteering
  • Graduate students who are volunteering
  • Graduate students as a Masters Thesis supervisor

 

Dr. Steve Haase - FSC101   477-1160

Topics, projects: 

  • Conscious vs. Unconscious Perception  examining the relationship between conscious and unconscious perception. Main contributions on this project would be with data collection, at least initially.
  • Attention  studying how the processing of a stimulus changes as a function of focusing ones concentration on or allocating processing resources to a stimulus.
  • Other  most topics in the broad area of cognition and perception, including real-world applications.

Students roles: 

Students participating in a research group will take part in some or all aspects of a project, including:
  • Project development
  • Testing participants
  • Data analysis
  • Presentation of results
 

Requirements: 

Students should have completed either Experimental Psychology or Applied Research Methods. Students should also be interested in research and the quest for new understanding.

Willing to work with: 

  • Undergraduates who are receiving credit (student will need to draft a project goals statement prior to the start of the project)
  • Undergraduates who are volunteering
  • Graduates students who are volunteering
  • Graduate students as a Masters Thesis supervisor

 

Dr. Robert Hale - FSC135  477-1177

Topics, projects: 

  • Shunning as Evolutionary Adaption
  • The Stress Response as measured by salivary cortisol
  • Emotion Regulation as measured by heart rate variability (HRV)
  • Binge drinking in college students

Students roles: 

Students typically write small grants, funded by the SU Foundation or the Pennsylvania Academy of Science. All students present completed research at the university and state level, with opportunities occasionally to present at the national level. All students are also expected to produce an APA style manuscript at the end of their research projects. Students are given co authorship on all presentations and resulting publications.

Requirements: 

Completion of the Psychology Research Methodology course (Psy 301) or a comparable course from another university with a “B” or better.

Willing to work with: 

  • Undergraduate students as Advanced Research (Psy 374/375) supervisor
  • Undergraduate students as Honors Thesis supervisor
  • Graduate students as a Masters Thesis supervisor

 

Dr. Thomas Hatvany - FSC111   477-1514

Research interests:

My research interests are focused on how certain aspects of our lives, such as goals or groups, become “fused” with the self-concept and how this influences motivation. I am also interested in different motivationally relevant individual differences, such as differences in what one finds tempting, self-control, motivational intensity, etc. influence motivation.

Student Roles:

  • Generating research questions
  • Literature reviews
  • Research design and preparation (which may include IRB preparation and grant writing)
  • Data collection and entry
  • Data analysis
  • Reporting results (preparing publications and presentations at conferences)
  • Productive students can earn co-authorship on presentations and publications.

Requirements:

  • Prefer students who have taken RD&S II and received an B or higher
  • Prefer undergraduates who plan on pursuing graduate work
  • Prefer students making multiple semester commitments
  • Must be willing to make a 6 hour a week commitment
  • Must be self-motivated and consistently responsible

Willing to work with:

  • Undergraduate students who are receiving credit
  • Undergraduates who are volunteering
  • Graduate students who are volunteering
  • Graduate students as a thesis supervisor

 


Dr. Amber E. Q. Norwood - FSC121   477-1551

Research interests: 

My research interests fall within a few different, but related, areas of study:

  • Severe mental illness (SMI) – treatment outcome effectiveness studies, especially those that incorporate mindfulness and/or motivational interviewing as an intervention component; substance use cessation and treatment (emphasis on tobacco for this population)
  • Forensic psychology – factors influencing community reintegration for incarcerated individuals and/or those adjudicated NCR/NGRI, other areas: public perception of mentally ill offenders, criminal competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, treatment of intimate partner violence offenders
  • Health behavior change – the transtheoretical model of intentional health behavior change, particularly tobacco/nicotine cessation, motivational interviewing as an intervention tool, integrative screening for health concerns, training of behavioral and medical health providers

I am open to investigating new ideas that fall broadly within one of these or a related realm!

Student roles: 

When possible, students will work with me as part of a research group/cohort and we will meet together to discuss projects and set associated goals.  Student roles will vary and will be determined on an individual basis.  Potential roles include, but are not limited to: literature review, research design (may include IRB preparation/submission), data collection & entry, data analysis, interpretation of findings, and reporting of results.

There is a potential for students to present at conferences and/or co-author research papers for submission.

Requirements: 

Students must have a genuine interest and enthusiasm for one of the above-mentioned project areas.  It is my expectation that students commit to 5-8 hours per week in research-related activities.  Students must also be self-motivated and able to manage deadlines.

Additionally, I have a preference to work with:

  • Students who have taken RD&S I & II and received a B or higher
  • Students interested in pursuing graduate work
  • Students willing to commit to 2 consecutive semesters of research

Willing to work with: 

  • Undergraduate students who are receiving credit
  • Undergraduate and graduate students who are volunteering
  • Graduate students as a thesis supervisor

 

Dr. Sue Morin - FSC114   477-1538

Topics, projects: 

My research is primarily focused on adolescents and children. I am currently working with issues related to divorce/remarriage the impact on adolescents and children. My most recent research interests include adolescents perceptions of parental discipline strategies and parent-child interactions.

Students roles: 

Students roles vary. Some students will be major participants from the beginning of the research idea to completion and presenting at conferences. Others prefer to collect data and write up results. The role of the student will be determined on a case by case basis.

Requirements:

  • Prefer students who have taken RD&S II and received an A or B.
  • Must commit for two or more semesters.
  • Must be prepared to present at conferences.
  • Students will have to do a semester of readings on the topic before they are able to actively participate in other phases of the project (such as data collection, etc.).

Willing to work with:

  • Undergraduate students who are receiving credit
  • Undergraduates who are volunteering
  • Graduate students who are volunteering
  • Graduate students as a Masters Thesis supervisor


Dr. Amber Norwood - FSC121   477-1581

Research interests: 

My research interests fall within a few different, but related, areas of study:

*Severe mental illness (SMI) – treatment outcome effectiveness studies, especially those that incorporate mindfulness and/or motivational interviewing as an intervention component; substance use cessation and treatment (emphasis on tobacco for this population)

*Forensic psychology – factors influencing community reintegration for incarcerated individuals and/or those adjudicated NCR/NGRI, other areas: public perception of mentally ill offenders, criminal competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, treatment of intimate partner violence offenders

*Health behavior change – the transtheoretical model of intentional health behavior change, particularly tobacco/nicotine cessation, motivational interviewing as an intervention tool, integrative screening for health concerns, training of behavioral and medical health providers

I am open to investigating new ideas that fall broadly within one of these or a related realm!

Student roles: 

When possible, students will work with me as part of a research group/cohort and we will meet together to discuss projects and set associated goals.  Student roles will vary and will be determined on an individual basis.  Potential roles include, but are not limited to: literature review, research design (may include IRB preparation/submission), data collection & entry, data analysis, interpretation of findings, and reporting of results.

There is a potential for students to present at conferences and/or co-author research papers for submission.

Requirements: 

Students must have a genuine interest and enthusiasm for one of the above-mentioned project areas.  It is my expectation that students commit to 5-8 hours per week in research-related activities.  Students must also be self-motivated and able to manage deadlines.

Additionally, I have a preference to work with:

*Students who have taken RD&S II and received a B or higher

*Students interested in pursuing graduate work

*Students willing to commit to 2 consecutive semesters of research

Willing to work with: 

*Undergraduate students who are receiving credit

*Undergraduate and graduate students who are volunteering

*Graduate students as a Masters Thesis supervisor


 

Dr. Kathryn Potoczak - FSC225   477-1372

Research Interests: 

  • The experimental functional analysis of aberrant behavior
  • The deceleration of aberrant behavior using extinction or capitalization on the schedule of reinforcement currently in effect
  • The use of behavior analysis in the teaching of college students
Through my past work has primarily been with individuals diagnosed with autism and other developmental disabilities, it is certainly possible to study the aberrant behavior of other types of individuals. An interesting new direction may be the application of functional analysis technology to individuals with emotional impairments.

Students roles: 

Students may either assist me or another student with an ongoing project, or conduct a project of their own. In either case, the students role is similar and may include (but s not limited to) the following, depending on the entry point of the student into the project:
  • Reviewing the research literature
  • Generating a research question
  • Designing an experiment
  • Collecting and analyzing data and Interpreting the results
  • Writing up a report
  • Presenting the results at a conference and/or submitting for publication

Requirements: 

Students who have taken a class with me and earned either an A or B are eligible, and enthusiasm is essential. In addition, students must be able to attend biweekly research meetings and be available at other times to conduct sessions with participants.

Willing to work with: 

  • Undergraduate students who are receiving credit
  • Undergraduates who are volunteering
  • Graduate students who are volunteering
  • Graduate students as a Masters Thesis supervisor

 

Dr Toru Sato - FSC213   477-1352

Topics, projects: 

Students are welcome to study personality and consciousness from the perspective of Depth and Transpersonal Psychology.  We will have weekly meetings, research the media, explore our own minds through introspection, and share creative work in the form of writing or other forms of art.  Undergraduate students may receive 3 credits for PSY 374 or 375 after completing 2 semesters of work (i.e., student enrolls in PSY 374 or PSY 375 in the second semester).  Students are also welcome to collaborate on presenting at a conference as a co-author if new and interesting discoveries are made. 

Students roles: 

May differ depending on research project and outcome
  • Literature and media search, reading, viewing, listening
  • Introspection (e.g. meditation, exploration of dreams)
  • Sharing introspections and creative works (e.g. poetry, stories, drawing and discussing how they relate to personality and consciousness
  • Presenting at conferences (rarely but occurs occasionally)

Requirements:

  • Must be committed to spending TR 2:00-3:30 pm in meetings and another 3.5 hours per week on work outside the meetings

Willing to work with: 

  • Undergraduate students receiving credit for PSY 374 or PSY 375 (3 credits may be granted for 2 semesters of work)
  • Graduate students who are volunteering

 

Dr. Kim Weikel - FSC115   477-1482

Topics, projects: 

  • Goal Setting  investigation of ways to set goals in order to increase chances of goal attainment
  • Therapy Effectiveness  investigation of factors influencing therapy effectiveness
  • Narcissism  investigation of the consequences of narcissistic personality and factors influencing the development of narcissism

Students roles: 

Students may work individually or participate in a research group. Students will take part in all aspects of a project, including:
  • Literature review
  • Research design
  • Data collection
  • Data analysis
  • Presentation/written report of results

Requirements: 

Students should be interested in research and have the time to participate in all the above mentioned aspects of the project.

Willing to work with: 

  • Undergraduate students who are receiving credit
  • Undergraduates and graduate students who are volunteering
  • Graduate students as a Masters Thesis supervisor