Programs and Concentrations

Courses

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Contact Us

Department of Biology
142 Franklin Science Center
Shippensburg University
1871 Old Main Drive
Shippensburg, PA 17257-2299
717-477-1401
biology@ship.edu

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Undergraduate Courses

BIO100 Basic Biology (3 crs.)

Deals with the principles of biology. Topics include evolution and origins of life, cellular structure and physiology, growth and repair,reproduction and development, control, sources of food energy,inheritance, and human inter-relationship with the biological environment. Three hours of lecture/week. Credit earned in this course is not applicable to the credits required of the biology major.

BIO115 Principles of Biology I (4 crs.)

Introductory course for majors that examines the diversity of life, plant form and function, animal form and function, and ecology. Three hours lecture and two hours lab/week.

BIO116 Principles of Biology II (4 crs.)

Introductory course for majors that examines cell structure and function, genetics,population genetics, and evolution. Three hours lecture and two hours lab/week.

BIO142 Introduction to Ecology (3 crs.)

Explores basic ecological patterns and processes that affect populations,communities, and ecosystems. Laboratory/field sessions emphasize ecological principles and techniques. Recommended for students seeking certification in environmental education whose major is not biology. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Credit earned in this course is not applicable to the credits required of the biology major.

BIO145 Environmental Biology (3 crs.)

Students are made aware of the many problems created by expanding human populations and technological growth and proliferation. Ecological alternatives are suggested. Topics include the shaping of humans by the environment, our relationships with the biotic and abiotic world, water and air pollution, climate change, pesticides, herbicides, contaminants, food additives, the urban environment and consequences of the expanding human population. Three hours lecture/week. Credit earned in this course is not applicable to the credits required of the biology major.

BIO150 Human Biology (3 crs.)

Introductory course for non-biology majors which involves a study of the structure and function of the human organism. Major diseases and contemporary factors that adversely affect human existence are considered. Three hours lecture/week. Credit earned in this course is not applicable to credits required of the biology major.

BIO201 Introduction to Biotechnology (1 cr.)

Comprehensive introduction to applications and methods of biotechnology. Topics include microbial, plant, animal, and marine biotechnology.Applications to medicine, forensics, and the environment will be examined. Required for Biotechnology concentration. One harlequin/week. Pre- or co-requisites: Principles of Biology I and II,Genetics, Microbiology, Chemical Bonding and Chemical Dynamics.

BIO208 Field Biology (3 crs.)

Field/laboratory course designed for biology majors with secondary education certification with focus on identification and ecology of local plants and animals including the study of soil, hydrology, oceanography, and a survey of current assessment technologies like GIS. Two hours lecture and three hours lab/field/week. Prerequisite: Principles of Biology I. Requires one weekend field trip. (Offered fall semester and summers as needed.)

BIO210 Field Zoology (3 crs.)

Introduction to principles and techniques of field zoological investigation. Field and laboratory studies provide opportunity to learn appropriate procedures for the collection, preservation, and identification of selected groups of local animals. Both lecture and laboratory present the theory and methodology of zoological systematics. Two hours lecture and three hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I. Requires one weekend field trip. (Offered spring semester.)

BIO220 Microbiology (3 crs.)

Deals with the structural characteristics, physiology, and genetics of bacteria as well as principles of immunology and host-parasite relationships. Viruses and fungi are also considered. Laboratory exercises provide experience in the aseptic technique, staining, and evaluating the responses of microorganisms to various environmental changes. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites:Principles of Biology I and II.

BIO242 Ecology (3 crs.)

Examines the interactions between organisms and their environment and the relationship between ecological processes and patterns of distribution and abundance of organisms. Laboratory/field sessions emphasize ecological principles and techniques. Two hours lecture and three hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and sophomore standing or permission of instructor.

BIO260 Genetics (3 crs.)

Introductory course dealing with the principles of heredity and the nature of the gene. Laboratory work includes genetic analysis in Drosophila and other organisms. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisite: Principles of Biology I and II.

BIO300, 301, 302 Biology Seminar (1 cr. each)

Discusses selected fields of biological research in depth. Major responsibility of the student will be to prepare by means of library research for the seminar discussions. One hour per/week. Restricted to junior and senior biology majors, prerequisites possible.

BIO310 Mammalogy (3 crs.)

Surveys various areas of mammalian biology including mammalian characteristics,evolution, classification, zoogeography, adaptive radiation,reproduction, population dynamics, behavior, physiology, ecology, and economic importance. Laboratory material covers trapping, study of skin preparation, identification of North American mammals, examination of skeletal and external adaptations, plus field and laboratory techniques. Includes a weekend field trip. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II.

BIO311 Ornithology (3 crs.)

Field course designed for a keener appreciation of the birds of Pennsylvania and the eastern United States. Focus is on identifying birds by sight and sound. The taxonomic, habitat, and community relationships of birds are emphasized. Instruction principally field trips during class periods on Saturday mornings. A multi-day field trip during spring vacation is an integral part of the course. Comfortable outdoor clothing, a pair of binoculars, and sturdy waterproof shoes/boots are required. Three hours field/museum instruction/week. Prerequisites:Principles of Biology I and II or permission of instructor.

BIO317 Parasitology (3 crs.)

Phenomenon of parasitism as it is practiced by a variety of organisms. Broad coverage will include the phylogeny, morphology, classification, and life cycles primarily of parasites of medical and veterinary importance; host-parasite relationships; and ecology epidemiology of parasitic diseases. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week.Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II and Microbiology.

BIO324 Pathogenic Microbiology (3 crs.)

Considers the role of bacteria and fungi in the diseases of man with emphasis upon the differentiation and culture of microorganisms, types of diseases, immunology, modes of disease transmission, prophylactic,therapeutic and epidemiological aspects. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II and Microbiology. (Offered spring semester.)

BIO325 Medical Botany (3 crs.)

Deals with the nature of selected physiologically active secondary plant metabolites and their development for use as medicines. Their mode of action will be covered, along with information on their discovery and history of their medical use. Compounds with activity in the central and peripheral nervous systems and those with pulmonary, renal, and cardiovascular effects will be included. Anti-neoplastic agents,teratogens, and plant toxins will also be studied. Introductory material on plant structure, function, and classification will be included along with the basic principles of pharmacology. Three hours lecture/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II and Human Physiology or Animal Physiology.

BIO330 Animal Behavior (3 crs.)

Basic course emphasizing such topics as territoriality, social hierarchy, and communication. The laboratory is a most important part of this course with the opportunity to structure experiments, evaluate results, and report conclusions. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week.Prerequisite: Principles of Biology I and II. (Offered fall semester,even years.)

BIO350 Human Physiology (4 crs.)

Study of the function of the human organ systems and their role in maintaining homeostasis. Three hours lecture and two hours lab/week.Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II. (Recommended for pre-health professions and secondary education students. Students may not count both BIO350 and BIO351 towards major requirements.)

BIO351 Animal Physiology (3 crs.)

Study of the function of organ systems of animals. Related anatomy is taught as needed. Two hours lecture and three hours lab/week. Prerequisites:Principles of Biology I and II and junior standing as Biology major or permission of instructor. (Students may not count both BIO350 and BIO351 towards major requirements.) (Offered fall semester.)

BIO370 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (3 crs.)

Introductory course in the structure of vertebrate animals. Laboratory work includes the comparative anatomical study of organ systems using representatives of the various protochordate and chordate classes. Emphasis on the physical evolution of the vertebrate classes using anatomical,embryological, and palaeontological evidence. Two hours lecture and three hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II. (Offered spring semester.)

BIO371 Human Anatomy (4 crs.)

Involves a comprehensive, detailed study of the development, growth and functional anatomy of the human body. Enrollment priority is given to students in pre-health professional programs that require human anatomy. Three hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II.

BIO373 Developmental Biology (3 crs.)

Introductory course in vertebrate embryology. Emphasis on the structural and functional aspects of comparative vertebrate reproduction and ontogeny.Laboratory work consists of the study of gametogenesis, early Amphioxusand frog development, and a selected series of chick and pig developmental stages. One hour lecture and four hours lab/week.Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II.

BIO374 Hematology (2 crs.)

Designed to give a basic understanding of the formation, structure, and function of the blood elements. Both normal and abnormal cells are studied as well as the more common blood diseases. Laboratory periods are interspersed with lecture. Two hours lecture/lab/week. Prerequisites:Principles of Biology I and II and Microbiology or permission of instructor. (Offered spring semester, even years.)

BIO375 Histology (3 crs.)

Involves the microscopic examination of vertebrate tissues from morphological and physiological perspectives. Reference made to organ embryogenesis to support understanding of organ form and function. Laboratory work involves extensive examination of microscope slides. Tissue preparation for histological examination is demonstrated. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II. (Offered spring semester.)

BIO385 Cell Biology (3 crs.)

Examines the structure and function of the cell. Topics include the molecular constituents of cells, information transfer, and the control of cell division. The structure, function, and biogenesis of the plasmamembrane, internal membranes, nucleus, cytoskeleton, mitochondria, and chloroplasts will be addressed. Laboratory work is examination of cell structure and function by molecular and microscopic techniques. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II, Genetics and Modern Organic Chemistry I or permission of the instructor.

BIO391 Biology Internship I (1-3 crs.)

Provides opportunity to gain practical experience in chosen career area. [Please note that only 3 credits of internship may count as biology credits.Credits in excess of that number count as free electives in the General Education requirement.]

BIO392 Biology Internship II (1-3 crs.)

Provides opportunity to gain practical experience in chosen career area. [Please note that only 3 credits of internship may count as biology credits.Credits in excess of that number count as free electives in the General Education requirement.]

BIO393 Selected Topics in Biology (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by the regular courses.

BIO396 Research III (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to do research under the guidance of selected faculty members. Students should register for this course only if they have credit for BIO398.Students should obtain approval of the research topic from the selected advisor before registering for course. Please note that only 3 credits of research may count as Biology credits. Credits in excess of that number count as free electives in the General Education requirement.

BIO397 Introduction to Research (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to do research under the guidance of selected faculty members. Students should obtain approval of the research topic from the selected advisor before registering for this course. Available as a pass/fail grade only. [Please note that only 3 credits of research may count as biology credits. Credits in excess of that number count as free electives in the General Education requirement.]

BIO398 Research II (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to do research under the guidance of selected faculty members. Students should register for this course only if they have credit for BIO397.Students should obtain approval of the research topic from the selected advisor before registering for this course. [Please note that only 3 credits of research may count as biology credits. Credits in excess of that number count as free electives in the General Education requirement.]

BIO408 Principles of Virology (3 crs.)

Covers morphology, replication cycles, and genetics of important bacterial,plant, and animal viruses as well as the use of viruses in biotechnology and gene therapy. Special emphasis given to viral pathogens of humans including the pathophysiology, transmission,treatment, and prevention of viral diseases. Newly emerging viral diseases and their impact on society will also be discussed. Graduate students expected to submit a 5-10 page term paper on a virology-related topic approved by the instructor. Prerequisites:Principles of Biology II and Genetics. Cell Biology pre- or co-requisites, or permission of instructor.

BIO409 Immunology (3 crs.)

Introduction to immunology, including immunity, serology, immunochemistry, and immunobiology. Other topics include immunodeficiency diseases, tumorimmunology, transplantation immunology, autoimmune diseases, and allergies. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology II and Genetics. Cell Biology pre or co-requisite or permission of instructor.

BIO417 Herpetology (3 crs.)

Study of amphibians and reptiles including classification, evolution,functional morphology, ecology, and husbandry. Laboratory work includes anatomical study, identification, and field trips. Two periods lecture and one period lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II or permission of instructor.

BIO418 Molecular Biology (3 crs.)

Examines structure and expression of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genes. Topics include experimental techniques used to clone, express, and analyze DNA sequences; chromosome and gene structure; mechanisms of DNA replication and repair; mechanisms of transcription and translation; the regulation of transcription; RNA processing and post-transcriptional regulation;gene regulation in development; and molecular mechanisms of mutagenesisand cancer. Includes discussion of current literature and use of on-line resources for analysis of DNA sequences. Prerequisites:Principles of Biology I and II, Microbiology, Genetics, Cell Biology or Biochemistry, or permission of instructor.

BIO442 Aquatic Ecology (3 cr.)

Is an introductory course in fresh water ecology. Field work consists of the study of selected aquatic environments and includes methods of collecting data, the identification of aquatic organisms, and the interpretation of factors which influence their distributions. A paper based upon field work may be required. One hour lecture and four hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II or graduate status. 

BIO425 Biota of Florida (2 crs.)

Seminar/field course deals with the biology of warm temperate and subtropical Florida including vegetation, fauna, geology, history, and economy. Offered spring semester of even-numbered years, it requires a single weekly class meeting plus an intensive 10-day field trip to parks, natural areas, and refuges in Florida over spring break. Field trip costs for the student include food, transportation, entrance and camping fees.Prerequisite: Biology major with junior standing or permission of  instructors.

BIO430 Principles of Evolution (3 crs.)

Introduction to evolutionary principles, their applications, and the appropriate literature. Major topics include the history of evolutionary concepts,the species and  speciation processes, phylogenetic patterns and their reconstruction, classification, biogeography, extinction, and biological nomenclature. Three hours lecture/week. Prerequisites:Principles of Biology I and II and Genetics or permission of instructor.

BIO444 Conservation Biology (3 crs.)

Applies the principles of population ecology, population genetics,biogeography, animal behavior, and paleobiology to the maintenance of global diversity and natural systems. Research theory is applied to conservation policy and management decisions. Two periods lecture and two periods lab/discussion per week. Includes midweek and weekend field trips. Prerequisites: college course in ecology or wildlife biology, or graduate status in the biology department.

BIO448 Field Botany and Plant Taxonomy (3 crs.)

Deals with principles of classification and systematics of vascular plants,with emphasis on local plant communities. Field trips and laboratories develop skill in the use of technical and popular identification manuals. Library readings develop familiarity with principles undeliberate of plant systematics and ecology. Memorization of selected,local species required. Field trips include several local excursions plus a weekend trip to natural areas in Pennsylvania and the Delmarva Peninsula. Prerequisite: Principles of Biology I and II or permission of instructor.

BIO450 Endocrinology (3 crs.)

Study of the glands of internal secretion and their biochemical and physiological role in development, growth, metabolism, homeostasis, and reproduction of animals. Prerequisite: Human Physiology or permission of instructor.

BIO461 Techniques in Biotechnology (3 crs.)

Provides hands-on experience with standard molecular biology and immunological techniques commonly used in industrial and academic laboratories.Methods include immunoblotting methods, ELISA, isolation and analysis of DNA and RNA, protein purification, and gene cloning techniques. One hour lecture and four hours lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology II and Genetics. Cell Biology pre or co-requisite or permission of instructor.

BIO462 Invertebrate Zoology (3 crs.)

Synopsis of the phylogeny, classification and important adaptive features of major and minor invertebrate phyla. Emphasis on taxonomy and a comparative study of the morphology, composition, and functioning of the animal organ systems or their operational equivalent, as they occurring a broad representation of invertebrate groups, to include patterns of development, reproductive strategies, and life history adaptations.Graduate students required to complete additional course requirements.Prerequisites: Upper division standing, graduate status, or permission of instructor.

BIO463 Vertebrate Zoology (3 crs.)

Explores the diversity, function, and phylogenetic relationships among the vertebrate animals. Graduate students are required to submit a research paper on a topic approved by the instructor in addition to other course requirements. Two hours lecture and two hours lab/week. Prerequisites:Principles of Biology I and II, or graduate standing, or permission of instructor.

BIO485 Biological Microscopy and Imaging (3 crs.)

Covers principles and techniques in macrophotography, light microscopy,especially micro- photography and videography, and scanning electronmicroscopy (SEM). Includes specimen handling and preparation including basic theory and practice in fixation, dehydration, dark room techniques, and computer imaging. Perform basic maintenance and alignment of the SEM. Research project required. Graduate students required to complete additional course requirements. Prerequisites:Upper division or graduate standing or permission of instructor.

BIO491 Selected Topics (1-3 crs.)

Opportunity to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest not covered by regular courses.

BIO494 Field Research Techniques (3 crs.)

Overview of methods for investigating biological field problems. Students will learn to use a variety of techniques in field conditions. Collection,analysis, and interpretation of data will be emphasized. Methods applied in current professional literature will be discussed. Graduate students will be required to complete an independent project culminating in a written report. Prerequisites: Graduate or upper division standing or permission of instructor.

The following courses are regularly offered at the Marine Science Consortium at Wallops Island, Virginia, during the summer. Courses on other topics may also be offered.

BIO205 Marine Biology (3 crs.)

Introduction to the marine environment. Includes the physical characteristics of marine ecosystems and the adaptations of organisms that live there.Only at WIMSC during summers. Two periods lecture and two periods lab/week. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I.

BIO245 Marine Ecology (3 crs.)

Deals with interactions of plants and animals in the unstable coastal environment. The barrier islands of the U.S. East Coast are emphasized.Only at WIMSC during summers. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I.

BIO315 Marine Invertebrates (3 crs.)

Survey of invertebrate phyla indigenous to coastal waters. Structural and functional adaptations discussed. Only at WIMSC during summers.Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I.

BIO331 Behavior of Marine Organisms (3 crs.)

Examines intra- and interspecific behavior with emphasis on adaptive significance that accrues to marine species. Topics include conflict,reproduction, and communication. Only at WIMSC during summers.Prerequisite: 9 hours of biology or psychology.

BIO413 Marine Ichthyology (3 crs.)

Study of the internal and external structure of fishes, their systematic and ecological relationships, and their distribution in time and space.Only at WIMSC during summers. Prerequisite: 16 credits of biology or graduate status.

BIO446 Ecology of Marine Plankton (3 crs.)

Deals with the phytoplankton of near-shore and pelagic waters. Importance of phytoplankton in energy flow emphasized. Only at WIMSC during summers.Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and an ecology course.