Course Offerings

Spring Semester 2017
Fall Semester 2017


Spring 2017


HON 100: Honors Introduction to Human Communication (equivalent to HCS 100: Introduction to Human Communication)

Gen. Ed. Category: Required Skills and Competencies
TR 8:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.

This course is designed with two primary goals. First, as an introductory course, Introduction to Human Communication introduces you to the field of human communication and provides you with the background to pursue upper-level courses in Communication. Accordingly, this course focuses on communication contexts, vocabulary, and basic theories of the discipline to provide you with a foundation for advanced study. In addition to public speaking, we survey important features in the study of all human communication, including language, conflict, climates, culture, and gender, and we locate specific study within the contexts of interpersonal and group communication. Second, as an introduction to a humanistic field of study, this course seeks to provide application of theory in order to further your skills as communicators, and abilities as critical thinkers. Consequently, this course focuses on experiential learning in order to demonstrate the purpose and practicality of academic inquiry.

HON 123: Honors World History II (equivalent to HIS 106: Thinking Historically in a Global Age)

Gen. Ed. Category: Required Skills and Competencies
Dr. David Godshalk
MW 2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
MW 3:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.

History is the study of the past, but it is certainly not immutable. What college freshmen were required to learn in their courses a few generations ago has changed considerably. Obviously, the past has not changed, but what historians have thought is important for you to study certainly has. To illustrate, in this course we will focus on important trends in the history of the world, beginning with humanity's earliest origins and ending around 1500 of the Common Era (C.E.). In other times and places, the stress of undergraduate history has been on Western Europe. Thus, we can see that even though the past might not change, history--the study of the past--does, depending on who tells the story.

HON 249: Honors Introduction to Literature (equivalent to ENG 250: Introduction to Literature)

Gen Ed. Category: B
Dr. Sharon Harrow
TR 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

This course will be a unique academic and field experience, using New York as a laboratory for exploring the origins, dislocations, and new social configurations associated with the rise of modernity. We will also examine some of the most enduring literary and artistic achievements of our time. Students enrolled in this course or Honors World History II will have the option to take part in a five-day, four-night field trip to New York so that they can experience firsthand some of the neighborhoods, buildings, parks, and food that have inspired the writers and historical actors whom we are studying. Throughout the semester, students will work in small groups on more specific projects relating to their majors and/or proclivities: music, art, immigration, architecture, the Harlem Renaissance, beat poetry, theater, bridges - you get the idea. Some possible texts: Washington Square by Henry James, The Age of Innocence OR The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Golden Spur by Dawn Powell.

HON 108: Honors Astronomy (equivalent to PHY 108: Astronomy)

Gen Ed. Category: C
Dr. Allen Armstrong
MWF 9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.

HON 274: Honors Introduction to International Politics (equivalent to PLS 141: World Politics)

Gen Ed. Category: D
Professor James Greenburg
TR 2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

This course is designed not only to introduce you to the fascinating field of World Politics, but also to facilitate both individual and group exploration of the continuously changing global order. To develop your creative, critical and systems thinking skills, this exploration will be viewed through the four frames of history, culture, theory and practice. Topics examined will include: culture and identity; war, peace and the international system; power and perspectives on international relations; 21st century globalization; and postmodernity and the future of the international system. Learning will take place within a broad context that includes; readings and class discussion combined with individual reflection and research; and collaborative and group work. Guest speaker forums and a globally focused field trip to Washington, DC. are also included. Both of these are designed to provide unique exposure and insights regarding the larger international relations and international affairs communities. Overall, you will gain an appreciation for the exploration of World Politics as a “team sport” involving broad engagement, conversations and experiences both outside and inside the classroom.

HON 161: Honors Introduction to Sociology (equivalent to SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology)

Gen Ed. Category: E
Dr. Debra Cornelius
TR 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Sociology is a social science that tries to connect personal issues with public issues. We look “behind the curtain” to examine how systems of power and privilege influence our everyday activities. My research field is Mexican immigration. In our class this semester, we will examine the invisible labor force that sustains our standard of living.Do you know where your food comes from? Who harvests it? Are you aware of the behind-the-scenes immigrant labor that supports us? You will learn about the lives and journeys of people who put the food on our tables, clean our hotel rooms, trim our hedges, and care for our children. Using a sociological perspective, we will connect our personal lives with their lives by listening to their voices. As a group, we will interview local migrant workers and share their stories with the Ship community. Along the way, you will learn the core concepts and research methods in the discipline of sociology.

Upper-Division Courses

HON 411: Honors Introduction to Exceptionalities (equivalent to EEC 273: Introduction to Exceptionalities)

Dr. Thomas Gibbon
MW 5:00 p.m. - 6:15 p.m.

Counts as one of the required Honors Seminars. Open to Honors sophomores, juniors, and seniors. This is a required course for Education Majors. Multiple clearances are needed for this course.

This course provides students in education and other related areas a background in the field of special education and the nature of exceptionality in children and youth. Emphasis is placed on societal attitudes and practices in relation to persons with exceptionalities, current practices in identifying and classifying children and youth with exceptionalities, characteristics of all exceptional population groups, programmatic needs of individuals with exceptionalities, and issues and trends in the various fields that affect diagnosis, classification, and programming or service delivery. The knowledge base for the course content comes out of social, cognitive, and developmental psychology, medical aspects of exceptionality, educational law and policy, and special education.

PLS 348: Applied Diplomacy: Model Organization of American States

Dr. Mark Sachleben
MWF 11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

Counts as one of the required Honors Seminars. Open to Honors sophomores, juniors, and seniors and other students by the permission of the instructor. Counts as major credit for Political Science and International Studies majors and minors. Please note that there is a required application process for this course.

The Model Organization of American States (MOAS) is a simulation that allows students from several universities from the Western Hemisphere to come together and discuss problems and topics that affect countries in the Americas. In order to prepare for the simulation, students spend the semester researching the country that they will represent, the OAS, and the issues that confront the region.

Prior to the beginning of the simulation, students receive a briefing at the embassy or mission of their country. Often times this briefing is from a high-level representative of their country and affords students the opportunity to engage in a question and answer session with a person who is actually working on the issues that the students are researching. Work sessions occur in a hotel conference center and at OAS headquarters in Washington, D.C. The students work on topics as diverse as economic development and planning, security, international law, human rights, education, social issues, labor practices, and environmental protection.


Tentative Fall 2017


HON 100: Honors Introduction to Human Communication (equivalent to HCS 100: Introduction to Human Communication)

Gen. Ed. Category: Required Skills and Competencies

This course is designed with two primary goals. First, as an introductory course, Introduction to Human Communication introduces you to the field of human communication and provides you with the background to pursue upper-level courses in Communication. Accordingly, this course focuses on communication contexts, vocabulary, and basic theories of the discipline to provide you with a foundation for advanced study. In addition to public speaking, we survey important features in the study of all human communication, including language, conflict, climates, culture, and gender, and we locate specific study within the contexts of interpersonal and group communication. Second, as an introduction to a humanistic field of study, this course seeks to provide application of theory in order to further your skills as communicators, and abilities as critical thinkers. Consequently, this course focuses on experiential learning in order to demonstrate the purpose and practicality of academic inquiry.

HON 106: Honors Writing Intensive First-Year Seminar (equivalent to ENG 114: Writing Intensive First-Year Seminar)

Gen. Ed. Category: Required Skills and Competencies

The goal of this course is teach you what it means to be a Public Intellectual: a scholar whose particular academic training helps him or her to contribute to the larger world. We will examine the discourse, or language, of your chosen field, and you will develop the rhetorical skills you need to write well within your own discipline. However, this course will do more than simply teach you to write well; you will learn how writing acts as a force of change in the world. You will also learn how and why it is important to present your ideas in a public forum and thus will be required to present your research in class. You will also write several mock conference proposals. This will help you to think of your work as part of a conversation beyond the classroom.

HON 122: Honors World History I (equivalent to HIS105: Historical Foundations of Global Cultures)

Gen. Ed. Category: Required Skills and Competencies

History is the study of the past, but it is certainly not immutable. What college freshmen were required to learn in their courses a few generations ago has changed considerably. Obviously, the past has not changed, but what historians have thought is important for you to study certainly has. To illustrate, in this course we will focus on important trends in the history of the world, beginning with humanity's earliest origins and ending around 1500 of the Common Era (C.E.). In other times and places, the stress of undergraduate history has been on Western Europe. Thus, we can see that even though the past might not change, history--the study of the past--does, depending on who tells the story.

Honors 210: Introduction to Music (equivalent to MUS 121: Introduction to Music)

Gen. Ed. Category: B
Dr. Margaret Lucia

HON 196: Honors Chemistry in the Modern World (equivalent to CHM 103: Chemistry: A Cultural Approach)

Gen. Ed. Category: C

Chemistry: A Cultural Approach develops an understanding of the relationship between chemistry and our society and illustrates the way a scientist thinks about science. Coverage will include discussion of elements, atoms, molecules, molecular properties, and simple chemical reactions. Discussions will be based on class deliberation of public policies of chemical topics such as BPA in plastic bottles, flame retardants in furniture, and nanoparticles in personal care products.

HON 141: Honors World Geography (equivalent to GEO 101: World Geography)

Gen. Ed. Category: D

In this course we will examine patterns and processes that define human settlement in various places around the world. We will examine the historical context to help identify relationships between societies and their environments, and the spatial patterns that have emerged within those societies. Topics that will be examined include: location, population, landforms, ecology, culture, natural resources and settlement patterns. While we will cover the same content as in the regular general education World Regional course, I will try to present the information in a different manner with many group learning opportunities, student presentations, and hands-on computer projects.

HON 160: Honors Cultural Anthropology (equivalent to ANT 111: Cultural Anthropology)

Gen. Ed. Category: E
Dr. Alice James