By successfully completing the Honors Program, students will be able to:

1. Apply the tools (methodologies/content/skills) of multiple disciplines to analyze and/or solve complex issues and problems.

2. Work collaboratively with persons from different fields of specialization in diverse, cross-disciplinary teams to analyze and/or solve applied, real-world issues and problems.

3. Demonstrate the ability to design, plan, and execute an original research or creative capstone project in the appropriate discipline or interdisciplinary field that would meet professional standards in the field (e.g., accepted/acceptable for publication in a juried journal; accepted/acceptable for presentation at a state, regional, national, or international conference).

4. Effectively communicate the methods, techniques, and findings of their original research or creative capstone project:

a. in a written format that would be accepted/acceptable for publication in a local, regional, national, or international juried journal.

b. in an oral or visual format that would be accepted/acceptable for presentation at a local, state, regional, national, or international conference.

5. Demonstrate leadership skills (organization and planning, communication, delegation) by having taken one or more leadership roles in Honors curricular or co-curricular activities.

6. Appreciate the importance of civic responsibility and demonstrate informed and engaged civic responsibility by having participated regularly in community service and/or service-learning projects.

To complete the University Honors Program curriculum, students will take 36 Honors credits distributed as follows:

1. Eight Honors courses in general education, 24 credits: The Honors Program offers a variety of Honors courses in general education each semester. Most Honors courses correspond to regularly offered general education courses. For example, HON 122: Honors World History I is equivalent to HIS 105: World History I. Honors courses that don't correspond to regular general education courses can still fulfill general education requirements. (The general education categories that Honors courses fulfill are posted on the Honors course offerings.) Students usually complete most of their Honors courses in general education during their freshman and sophomore years.

Honors Writing Intensive First Year Seminar (WIFYS) is required as 3 of the 24 general education credits. This course prepares Honors students to be effective writers in their own disciplines and in the Honors Program. Students will be introduced to the elements of professional discourse in their own discipline so they are prepared to participate in that discourse as undergraduates. Students will research and write an exemplary essay in their discipline and learn about academic venues for disseminating their research, including academic conferences and journals. They will share their disciplinary findings with a wider audience by communicating the results of their research at a public forum. (Note: AP or transfer credits may fulfill the WIFYS requirement, but students will need to substitute another Honors course in general education.)

2. Three Honors seminars, 9 credits: Honors seminars will be explorations of specific topics designed to demonstrate the interconnectedness of academic disciplines. The small seminars (usually 15 to 20 students) will focus on discussion of readings and will include individual or group research projects.

Some seminars, including Honors Business and Society and Honors Introduction to Exceptionalities, meet core requirements for business and education majors, respectively, and students may occasionally be able to count other seminars toward the completion of their major requirements. Students will usually complete the Honors seminars during their junior and senior years. Students who complete undergraduate research or creative projects beyond the Honors capstone requirement may petition to substitute this experience for one or more of their Honors seminars.

3. One Honors capstone project, 3 credits: The culmination of your Honors Program experience is your Honors capstone project. The Honors capstone project is a major independent or collaborative research, creative, or service-learning project. Students usually complete their capstone projects during their senior year and present their projects at the Honors Symposium at the end of their senior year. Please review the Honors Capstone Project Handbook carefully for specific guidelines for completing your capstone project.

These curricular requirements are summarized in the advising worksheets found on the Forms page of the Honors website

The culmination of your Honors Program experience is your Honors capstone project. The Honors capstone project is a major independent or collaborative research, creative, or service-learning project. Students usually complete their capstone projects during their senior year and present their projects at the Honors Symposium at the end of their senior year. Please review the Honors Capstone Project Handbook carefully for specific guidelines for completing your capstone project.

The schedule of Honors courses offered each semester is posted approximately one year in advance. Students are encouraged to plan ahead to avoid enrolling in courses that will be offered as Honors courses in a later semester.

The Honors secretary, Cindy Poe, schedules students into courses before the regular scheduling period begins. To schedule Honors courses, students should contact Ms. Poe at cmpoe@ship.edu on the specific dates posted on the Calendar of Events and let her know which Honors courses they would like to schedule. If any courses are oversubscribed, students will be given priority based on the number of credit hours they have earned.

As part of the Honors Program's curricular requirements, each student must complete an Honors capstone project worth 3 credits. One option for the capstone is to enroll in the Honors Colloquium, a course typically offered each fall. Students in the colloquium design and execute a major interdisciplinary service-learning project relating to a specific theme. The students then present the results of their work at the University Honors Symposium in the spring.

To learn more about the colloquium, check out the websites of previous projects:

Reach Out: Enhancing Education in the Dominican Republic
Ship It: Textbooks Go Global

An Honors student's experience at Shippensburg University culminates with the presentation of his or her Honors capstone project at the annual Honors Symposium. Family members, fellow students, faculty, administrators, and other guests are invited to attend this special event. See our calendar for the date and location of this year's symposium.

Symposium Archive

If you're interested in seeing what past Honors students have done for their capstones, click here for a list of symposiums from previous years.

Honors students must maintain a minimum 3.25 QPA in their Honors courses and a minimum 3.25 QPA overall in order to remain academically eligible for membership in the Honors Program. Students who do not maintain a minimum 3.25 QPA in both their Honors courses and overall will be placed on probation. If, after two semesters of being a full-time student on probation, they have not achieved a minimum 3.25 QPA in both their Honors courses and overall, they will no longer be academically eligible for membership in the Honors Program. Students may appeal decisions regarding their academic eligibility to the Honors Program Advisory Board.

In order to complete the academic requirements of the Honors Program, Honors students should enroll in at least one Honors course each semester. If a student has not completed the program's academic requirements and does not enroll in Honors courses for two consecutive semesters without providing a written explanation that has been approved by the Honors director, the student will be dismissed from the program.